Help with writing drum parts

drumhead92

New member
I've been playing with a band since this february but up until now we have mostly played covers. We are now starting to write more of our own music and I was wondering if anyone had some tips on writing your own drum parts. I've done well so far but it is an area I want to improve in.
 

ryan462

New member
I really try to keep my parts simple as possible at first .. it always seems to help the other band members if you're consistent during their writing process. Once the song and it's structure is solid I typically just play what comes naturally. Good luck !
 

iatemygoat

New member
ryan462":339hcpsr said:
I really try to keep my parts simple as possible at first .. it always seems to help the other band members if you're consistent during their writing process. Once the song and it's structure is solid I typically just play what comes naturally. Good luck !
totally agree and to add to it, once structure is complete take the riffs home (either in your head or recorded to a tape or something simple) and think about them on your own time. depending on what type of music you play, try and figure out where the other instruments need to stick out the most so play simple. then think of where you can be put in the spot light and write something really cool.
 

stump

New member
Our band records every practice and burns them to CD. With new tracks i agree with the guys that keep it simple at first with a solid rhythm and tempo and take it home and practice with the CD. That's where you can get creative. Good luck and peace on ya!
 

break the prism

New member
i use a mix of traditional musical notes and drum sheet music. i write out traditional notes, but each staff represents a different piece of the kit. i don't use different marks for different strokes or moves. i tend to improvise that.
 

SGarrett

New member
Here's what I do. Like others have said, I like to record rehearsals and play new songs with a really simple groove so I can get a good listen. Then I'll come up with a few different parts for the next rehearsal. When we play the new song I'll play a different groove on each verse and chorus. That way I can listen back and see what works and what doesn't. From there I add fills the same way. Try a few different fills and see which ones sound the best.

Or, I just jam and see what comes out. It really sucks when you aren't recording though.

Oh, and you don't need a bunch of gear to record. Just a Radio Shack mic in the center of the room and a tape player that records.
 

dave lynch

New member
I really agree with the record thing..I was jammin with some folks the other day doing some new stuff the guitar player wrote and I wanted to play it a little faster then the bas player (the guitar player and bass player are a team) so I did what I could to play slower and after time I thought I was kinda in there...When I heard it back I couldn't believe how bad I dropped the tempo..I guess I was so concerned about not playing to fast that I held back a little to much...man I was not happy about that...Now I know not to try to follow the bass but keep it steady and let the players play to me.. a tad fast at 1st but steady to me is better then slowing down or speeding up practice after practice...Yeah simple at 1st almost like a drum machine then listen to it and create from there..now I need to practice what I preach for the next time we jam togther..!!
 
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