hand/foot separation

drumtone

New member
ok, so i've been drumming for a little while now, getting real comfortable, but there is one thing thats driving me crazy, and that my hand to foot separation.
i've been really trying to get some funk grooves goin and i find that my right foot on the bass drum wants to do what my right hand is doing on the hats. it's not as bad when i'm on the ride, or if im playing open-handed, but i play cross handed a lot and i want to get rid of this monkey on my back.

anyone know of any good resources or grooves that really work hand/foot separation specifically?
 

Eiren

New member
You've got to "unlearn" the association between them, and it's pretty frustrating at first to do so.

Try playing different things on your hand to what your foot should be playing. So play 16ths on the bass drum, and just quarter notes on the hi-hat, and lots of variations along that theme.

You want to start training your brain to treat each limb as a separate entity.
 

rervousneck

New member
I don't know if you're into the band Tool or not... but the drummer Danny Carey uses a LOT of hand/foot seperation in their songs... he frequently uses very simple sounding beats that are very hard to replicate. And then on top of that the fills are a beast of their own.

After about a year of me playing... I attempted to learn "Sober" by Tool. Again, sounds easy, but it's tricky. It's a good one to start with though. Took me 6 months to get comfortable with it.

Then, if you reach a point when you think you're good... try "The Pot"

There are TONS of other drummers to look to as well, such as:

Virgil Donati
Steve Gadd
and a new band (to me at least) from Austrailia called Karnivool has an amazing drummer named Steve Judd. Their song "Fear in the Sky" is stocked full of hand/foot seperation. That band will grow... they are good!

Also, there are PLENTY of books and literature that can help you like Four Way Coordination by Marv Dahlgreen.

Then basic rudiments can be used with the feet and then you can mix and match with your hands. Develop some unique patterns.


Good luck.
 

SeanGordon

New member
rervousneck":1phtm6vh said:
I don't know if you're into the band Tool or not... but the drummer Danny Carey uses a LOT of hand/foot seperation in their songs..
After about a year of me playing... I attempted to learn "Sober" by Tool. Again, sounds easy, but it's tricky. It's a good one to start with though. Took me 6 months to get comfortable with it.

Then, if you reach a point when you think you're good... try "The Pot"

Then basic rudiments can be used with the feet and then you can mix and match with your hands. Develop some unique patterns.
1st of all, rervousneck has some good and not so good advice there.
His description of danney carrey is very true, and sober isnt a bad place to start but only after you have figured out what makes you do what you do. Everyone has to break the habit differently, once you do and allow muscle memory to take over then you can approach sober for practice.

By no means will you be playing "The Pot" or even begin to understand it for a while,I say this becaues I would hate for you to get frustrated with trying to go to far to fast. Failure and Dissapointment would surely unsue.

A thing I try with people that i start out as a beginner is to start a 4/4 beat with kick on 1 & 3. set it and forget about it. rest your stick on the hi hat. now without the snare, close your eyes. picture the hi hat and your stick. now with your eyes closed start playing quarter notes, 1,2,3,4. then switch to 8th notes 1&2&3&4& then 16ths 11&&22&&33&&44&&. keep the vision of your stick playing this in your head. It helps teach your brain to keep everything else on auto pilot.

It doesnt work for everyone but helps with most. Use this when wanting to focus on any odd counting appendage while keeping the beat of the others on auto pilot. The eyes cause your mind to think differently but once your brain has learned it without seeing it it will be easier to recall with your eyes open. Especially after muscle memory takes over. This takes time so dont expect over night success.

Hope this helps you.

-SG
 

mikelvan

New member
Here is another suggestion. Try some paradiddles between your right hand and right foot..

foot hand foot foot hand foot hand hand.. alternate between your right and left hands ane feet.
 

Johnny Cat

New member
When I first started out years ago, I had trouble keeping straight quarters going on the hats while playing 8th notes with my kick.

I broke out of this by counting my quarters on the hats as if they were two 8ths. The downbeat of the two 8th's would be me hitting the hats. The upstroke of my hand was the second 8th note, but it would be silence because I was coming back up. Even though I wasn't hitting anything, it still helped me keep straight quarters going and doing more with my foot. It also helped me keep the timing between those quarters more smooth, and thus improving my time.

Eventually it got to the point where I could do it without having to think of it in that way anymore. After that I started just working on independence exercises, but even now I still find myself grouping things like that in certain ways, and it never fails me.

Visualization can go a long way on the drums.
 

rervousneck

New member
SeanGordon":1p3mo5wo said:
By no means will you be playing "The Pot" or even begin to understand it for a while,I say this becaues I would hate for you to get frustrated with trying to go to far to fast. Failure and Dissapointment would surely unsue.


That was more or less a joke. I guess I'm not funny!
I never meant to imply it would be easy. And just for the record... by no means was it meant to be implied that I know how to play the pot perfectly. I just know it is a challenge for me (because I feel dissapointed and like a failure). That's good advice you give though.
 
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