fast feet = a false fad?

Belive me I am not one to judge others drumming, but just a few few days ago I was conversing with some friends of mine over drumming and technique and somebody brought up the fact that "Unless you can play fast doubles on your kick drums you are no good." That statement pissed me off, yet it made me realize that nowadays "fast feet" are the hot commodity among young, aspiring drummers. I agree having good double-kick technique is definately a plus, but I in no way think it defines a drummer or his/her skill. I admit I use two kick drums and I play some metal songs but never any that involve constant double. It deeply saddened me to realize the fact that since this new stream of metal came along (i.e. - Lamb of God, Trivium, As I Lay Dying) drummers have been more focused on trying to out-do other drummers with their double-kicking instead of focusing on the main groove of the song. I am not saying that Chris Adler (Lamb...) and Travis Smith (Triv...) are bad drummers because they are very talented without question. All I am saying is that EXCESSIVE double-kicking takes away from the groove and meaning of the song. Honestly I think alot of metal songs sound like there is a air-conditioning unit turned in in the background due to the overuse of the "fast feet". There comes a point when double kicking crosses the line between sounding good and adding punch to just plain annoying. Am I an ass or does somebody out there agree...lol
 

blackreign

New member
I have been listening to metal for a long time... and you are correct about that...

I try to not play as fast as possible, due to every metal drummer sounding the same, don't get me wrong, some metal drummers are amazing (death metal drummers are insanly fast, along with black metal drummers) but it seems like alot of these guys only listen to metal and never try to play anything else, look at the band opeth, Martin Lopez (who recently quit the band) uses less double kick and more groove, and jazz oriented beats...

I used to have the attitude "faster is better" until my band started to change our sound a little, we were "traditional" black metal when we started, but we now play a more rock and rollish, metal, black metal but not played at 200 + bpm...

sometimes though the drumming has to be fast to suit the type of music though so it is understandable, but Im sure people can be a little more original instead of playing blast beats and d-beats in metal...
 

Eiren

New member
Aye, I think too much of anything is not a good idea... whether it be too much double kick, or too many swiss triplets (or anything else you care to name).

It's good to keep things varied and creative.

Double kick is suited to certain parts of the music, to really drive it, where groove is not really the effect desired.

I wouldn't say it's a new fad started by Lamb of God or Trivium type bands. This type of drumming in metal has been around for many many years now.
 

seandude

New member
it ruins the creativity of the song by just playing double bass the whole time its more fin with triplets and stuff
 

Ericinho6

New member
seandude":3bz2q8lm said:
it ruins the creativity of the song by just playing double bass the whole time its more fin with triplets and stuff
I agree.

Things like Danny Carey does really impress me with how musical he makes the double bass. It's not about just "walking" it all the time, but using it as a tool to groove through sections with that independence he's so great at.
 

Damagedrummer

New member
I play double bass most of the time. Not because I want to show off, but because it fits our music perfectly. We have to songs where the bassdrums keep on going in 16th for like the entire song. It fits those songs well and I like to play that way. But if it sounded like shit in a certain song I wouldn't play it. It depends on what type of music you're playing, but I agree with you that unless you can play double bass you're a bad drummer. That's bullshit, most great drummers can't play double bass. And most young drummers are indeed atracted by double bass, but the few who will get serious into drumming, will later understand that there is much more to it then just keeping those kicks rolling. DB-drumming is just a style, just like jazzdrumming or whatever. And in the early days drummers pushed the bounderies of it, and you see the same thing happening with doublebass drumming. The trick is to keep it musicall...Or at least that's my opinion
 

Damagedrummer

New member
seandude":1u5btqbr said:
it ruins the creativity of the song by just playing double bass the whole time its more fin with triplets and stuff
I have to disagree, because it depends strongly on what type of music you're playing. Like 95% of alle populair songs are played in straight 4/4. And do you hear anyone saying.."hmmm damn another 4/4beat. That really ruins the creativity.." In Deathmetal it give's a certain power to play constant double bass. But it's because a song is written for it or around it. Don't get me wrong, I get your point, but I just don't think you can say alot of double bass takes away the creativity..It all depends on the kind of music and what the songs askes for. If you got like a slow ballad, and stuffed it with double bass then I could agree..
 

TheYardstick

New member
I agree, there are some songs where double-kick is terribly overused, sometimes it sounds like a motorcycle idling.
 

Led_Tyler

New member
I have to agree that the speed of your feet, or the speed of your hands for that matter, cannot define your talent or ability. You dont have to be fast to be great; I would much rather be slower and keep it super clean then have a sloppy double bass drum pedal solo and sloppy tom work. If you wanted to determine your caliber, you would simply have to base it off of your Rythm or feel to the music and ofcourse your chops. I play a little of everything myself, including the fast double bass, but I look at it as more of a new trait to pick up along the way. So, overall, fast feet can be good, but it all depends on your rhythm and such; then again, i cannot stand(i don't know about you guy's) the robot sound of some drummers on their double kick drums, i'm gonna use the drummer from As I Lay Dying for an example. The song 94 hours, that bass beat is fast, but it is robot sounding and I often find myself wondering wheter it even is the actuall drummer. With all of this said, speed isn't always the best, its just a trait of drumming that is suddenly getting popular...Now i begin to wonder if people agree with me about the robot sounding bass... :?
 

break the prism

New member
personally, i never understood the point of doing repetitive, fast double bass, even in death metal. i think every genre of music has room for more flavor than that.
i use double bass, but never for more than a few measures in a song.
 

Gaddabout

New member
Can anyone here imagine enjoying playing a song without a single double-bass riff? Could you go an entire song with your left foot on the hi-hat pedal?
 

meta L ucas

New member
as long as you keep the techniques mixed up evenly and you try to make a NEW sound, fast doule bass chops are okay. DO NOT repeat ALL your chops in every song like some bands have thier drummers do. always keep it different. i personally play double bass a lot but i switch and shift it up a lot as well as many other NON-metal influences.
 

st3v3n

New member
i try to keep things moving along as much as possible. when i play i try to utilize as much of my kit as possible instead of blasting out tons of double bass rhythms. its good to be fast but its also good to be accurate and have plenty of chops. its good to mix everything up as much as possible as well.

a great example of a metal drummer that does well at mixing everything together splendidly is george parfitt. he is the drummer of threat signal. a new band out on nuclear blast.

they are an insanely great metal band but he knows how to keep it rolling really well!

www.myspace.com/threatsignal

check him out tell me what you think.
 

screamkevin

New member
Gaddabout":sm49fieo said:
Can anyone here imagine enjoying playing a song without a single double-bass riff? Could you go an entire song with your left foot on the hi-hat pedal?
LOL, Gaddabout, I do that all the time. My second kick is mostly for looks, since the band I am in is a tribute to 80's hard rock/metal.
 

Gaddabout

New member
screamkevin":7dwwg51l said:
LOL, Gaddabout, I do that all the time. My second kick is mostly for looks, since the band I am in is a tribute to 80's hard rock/metal.
hehe Just asking since double bass seems to be the abject obsession of the board. I don't want to frighten anyone, but I've never played a double bass or double pedal on drum set in my entire life. Ever.

I know, I know, that sounds so 1975.
 

NCdrummer

New member
Nor have I gaddabout. I've messed around with a double kick in a drum shop but don't do it myself. Part of me wants to learn the technique but I'm a little uneasy about it. Old dog new trick thing I guess, lol. My band wants to do Welcome to the Black Parade by My Chemical Romance. I' told them there is some double kick that really adds to the song and I don't know how I'm going to pull it off. Course, there SOOO helpful, lol, as their response is usually "oh, dude, you can handle it."
 

screamBRYAN

New member
i agree

most 'death/black metal' bands use way to much double bass...not my thing personally, nor my choice in music.

listen to all of underoaths albums, first, they were a death metal band, and used tons of double bass, and gradually they slowed down to a more melodic band, listen to 'theyre only chasing safety' it has almost no double bass rifts, i can play out the entire album on single pedal.

i think all drummers should learn to play slow stuff on single pedals before they get nutty with a double kicker. i just had a jam session with my guitarist and he loves the fact i'm the only drummer in town who he has played with that can make slow but heavy beats to his slow music.

fast feet is definitely not everything or what makes a good drummer.
 

mudoyal

New member
i use double bass quite often. but yes, too much of it ( in my opinion) does put a dent in the creativity. but that's just me and the music i like speaking.
 
I like using double bass more for patterns than just trying to blaze out 16th notes as fast as I can. While that can be cool in a song in it's proper place, I'd personally rather listen to a drummer like Mike Novak of Every Time I Die who plays with a single pedal and a 4 piece kit and comes up with very creative, very cool beats and fills.
 
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