Extremely light sticks

Berkowitz

New member
I'm used to playing with a pair of Vic Firsth 3A American Classics, but the other day I picked up a pair of cheap generic sticks that my friends sister had gotten with her wal mart drumset (most likely a . They we so light they were about 13 inches long, maybe less, but they seemed to help me play faster, even though i have to hit a bit harde, but i would really like to find a brand that makes very light, very short sticks.
 

Groove

New member
Pro-Mark makes a "Junior" stick. It's a quality, legit stick. It's just shorter and lighter that the norm.
 

MikeRowland

New member
Vic Firth SD4 Combo,
Vater Fusion Sugar Maple
Any Maple Stick will be lighter than a corresponding Hickory or Oak stick. Be aware, however, that a maple stick is also less dense, and will break easier. I personally use Vater Piccolo sticks. It is a pretty beefy stick, yet weighs less than a 5b. I break quite a few of these compared to the 5b's I used to use, however, I have noticed less hand fatigue due to the lighter weight. Also, because the stick size, I find that I have to use less force to achieve my desired volume, resulting in less stress on my hands, wrists, and elbows (I have arthritis).
 

Drumbum18

New member
I use Zildjian 7A.
They are light and I can play fast with them.
Probably not the best for quality or life span.. but I like to bang around with them
 

Guy&i

New member
the lightest stick i ever used was A7 maple "Diamond Tip" by Joe Porcaro.
i had 2 pairs and i used them when i played a series of cover shows to Operation Ivy.
they seemed to survive quite a few shows but when i tried to play them in another project of mine they just snapped.
anyway, from my experience they r awsome. u need to hit a little harder but u get a really nice feel with them.
the Diamond tip changes the weight values of the stick so its fun to experience that too.
cheers
 

Gretz

New member
you could also try keeping your current stick... and practicing or warming up with something heavier and longer.

when you go to play with your current sticks they will feel shorter and lighter... same effect as what you experienced.

it's the same way when baseball players put weights on their bats to warm up, it makes the bat seem lighter when they step up to the plate
 

PHUNKYDRUMR

New member
Regal Tip used to make a drumstick called the sillouette,it had an elongated wood tip and was about 16" long and around .510 in diameter,about like a pencil!
As for very light sticks made today, i can only recommend that you visit Vic Firth's website and look at the sticks that are designed for jazz
www.vicfirth.com
 

BigD07

New member
Vater Los Angeles sticks are the best i'v found...not exactly the lightest but perfectly weighted for control and speed.
 

Johnny Cat

New member
The Regal Tip 7A is really light and the shortest stick they make. It's only 15", and it's really thin too. The diameter is .510". They come with both wood tip and nylon.
 

BillRayDrums

New member
There's a pretty well defined line between allowing the stick to do the work via it's natural balance and you doing the work for it.

Having a stick that is too light is actually counterproductive to what you are trying to accomplish. You really do want to find that stick, regardless of brand that fits your hand (most importantly) and work outward from there.

I use 2B's. Wanna know why? Because I've got huge hands and thinner sticks give me cramps. I used to use Pro-Mark 740's until I tried finding them when I was on the road (you can't) so I went with the most common stick on the planet, a 2B. And now, they actually feel very natural and don't seem like the tree trunks that I once viewed them as. And, I don't have hand problems anymore (whew). I used to use a long 5B with an Acorn head- some of you older guys might remember Carolina Stick Co. (LOVED their sticks) but they folded. I was so bummed!! Now I'm with Pro-Mark, as an endorser since 1996.
 

Johnny Cat

New member
BillRayDrums":27h0jkgf said:
There's a pretty well defined line between allowing the stick to do the work via it's natural balance and you doing the work for it.

Having a stick that is too light is actually counterproductive to what you are trying to accomplish. You really do want to find that stick, regardless of brand that fits your hand (most importantly) and work outward from there.

I use 2B's. Wanna know why? Because I've got huge hands and thinner sticks give me cramps. I used to use Pro-Mark 740's until I tried finding them when I was on the road (you can't) so I went with the most common stick on the planet, a 2B. And now, they actually feel very natural and don't seem like the tree trunks that I once viewed them as. And, I don't have hand problems anymore (whew). I used to use a long 5B with an Acorn head- some of you older guys might remember Carolina Stick Co. (LOVED their sticks) but they folded. I was so bummed!! Now I'm with Pro-Mark, as an endorser since 1996.
Couldn't agree more. I was using the Regal Tip 7A that I just mentioned for some time because I needed a really light stick (my hands are small), but it turned out they were too light and too short. Plus they were also cramping my left hand up. Great for rudiments, but when it came to playing around the kit they were more of a hindrance. I found the Regal Tip "Jazz E" which is pretty much the perfect stick for me to play with all around now. It's got just the right balance and rebound for my build and now my playing is pretty much effortless.
 

Steven McTowelie

New member
if you're looking for light sticks i definitely recommend the vater sugar maple fusion line, and the best thing about them is they come in very common sizes, so you can still have the same size of stick you want, but much lighter. other than that, like others have said, i love 5a models.
 

rufus4dagruv

New member
BillRayDrums makes a great point about cramping. I experienced something similar. I had been using Regal Jazz for quite some time, but occasionally, when I had to play in situations that required a heavier hand, I had some cramping issues. I switched to the Vic Firth 8D, which is only a hair bigger, and the problem has seemed to have corrected itself.

Another thing you may want to try is a maple stick. They're not as durable as hickory or oak, but they have a lighter feel. If you can adjust your technique just right, it may work.

Also, just about every major stick manufacturer lists their sticks on their websites with about as much detail as you would need; tip shape, taper, overall length and width, material, etc. Open up a bunch of tabs in your browser and just bounce between the different sites and compare some notes. Then, take a few bucks, depending on what you've narrowed your list down too, and go grab a few of them to check them out. Good luck.
 
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