dumb piccolo question

nickbaldwin

New member
In my mind it is a snare 14" or smaller, with a shallow depth, and it can sound more or less anywhere between a loud tight bark and a crack.
 

drummert2k

New member
piccolo refers to the depth of the snare. dependng on the company, 4 - 3 1/2 inches or shallower make it a piccolo. diameter really has nothing to do with it. there are differant names when talking about diameter.
 

musicmaker136

New member
well i own a 14"x3" pearl brass piccolo....its really tunable!!!! I can get a big fat*Pahh* or a tight*crack*
Its Awesome!!!!
 

loop

New member
skitch":3bgyvmuk said:
skdrummer":3bgyvmuk said:
Ludwig did make a power Piccolo snare in a 6-1/2x13" size at one time.

People often call Omar Hakim's signature snare a power picollo. It's 13x5. So I assume that power piccolos are 13x5 and deeper :)
 

xdoseonex

New member
piccolo has absolutely nothing to do with the diameter of the drum, you can litterealy have a 16" snare drum or a 10" snare drum,, if its a shallow snare, its a piccolo.
all a piccolo means is that its shallow.
as drummert2k said anything 4" and shallower could be considered a piccolo
 

Johnny Cat

New member
I had always understood a piccolo to be a snare drum in a higher register than a standard snare drum (which is 14" diameter, regardless of depth) as is for the piccolo flute. That's why it was named that in the first place. One would think typically that a smaller diameter would give it the higher tuning range before the depth of it would, and so that's why it was originally called that. They were out long before soprano and popcorn's came along with even smaller diameters, so I'm pretty sure it was due to the diameter first, and then that changed somewhere along the way when most companies stopped making them in a 13" size, and just continued making them shallow. After all, why would a 13" by 6" or 8" drum be called a power piccolo, if diameter has nothing to do with it? Maybe it has nothing to do with it now, but I'm fairly certain once upon a time it did.

That's my understanding, and I'm pretty sure it varies depending on whom you talk to and how far back you go in history.
 

skitch

New member
loop":3e035u8r said:
skitch":3e035u8r said:
skdrummer":3e035u8r said:
Ludwig did make a power Piccolo snare in a 6-1/2x13" size at one time.

People often call Omar Hakim's signature snare a power picollo. It's 13x5. So I assume that power piccolos are 13x5 and deeper :)
I couldn't really tell you; the Ludwig Power Piccolo came out in about 1991, long before the current trend in Soprano and Popcorn snares became fasionable. In fact, the Ludwig Power Piccolo may have been what set it off to begin with, as there wasn't much diameter choice before that time.

A piccolo Snare is usually 4" depth or less, most sommonly a 3.5 depth.
A Power Piccolo (Power equating to Power toms which were all the rage in the late 1980s and 90s) is usually a 6 to 6.5 depth drum with a 13" head diamter.
A Soprano is usually a 12" head diameter (and the marketing as such is attributed to Pearl whose endorse, Dennis Chambers, used one as his primary snare)
A Popcorn snare is usually a 6" deep shell with a 10" head diameter which are the rage right now for an auxilary snare.

Now, all of the Piccolo soprano popcorn thing comes from a way to market these drums as unique. Piccolo came from the piccolo flute, which is smaller than a regular flute and has a much higher and more distinguishable pitch. The Soprano term comes from the vocal area in a choir where the soprano voice is the highest voice in the choir. The popcorn term comes from the sound that these drums make, like the popping of popcorn if you made popcorn at home with oil and a metal sauce pan.

Whew! Now that I have explained all of that, I am back to finding that cure for cancer!
 
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