Duct tape

LouDaGr8

New member
Im currently getting alot of what i can describe as 'resonance' on my snare, and i know alot of drummers use duct tape on the skin to stop this, i've never done it before however and was looking for pointers on where and how much to put on my skin.

Any advice will be great!
 

dunkerton12

New member
Duct tape will work.

I'd recommend moongel though. It's removable and doesn't leave a mess or residue on the head.

Remember too that the resonance or overtones you hear may be annoying to you, but to the audience your kit will sound much different. Sometimes snare drums get muffled so much that they sound too "yippy" or weak to everyone but the drummer. Just a thought.
 

Airborne Ranger

New member
Exactly, it's that ring that will help the drum project through the guitars and bass. When you layer all the other instruments on top of the drums, the ring will disappear. I like a ringy snare, it gives it more presence out front. If you still want to use tape, go in small increments, only put enough to take the ring out, too much will deaden the head.
 

dbkman

New member
dunkerton12":226q7098 said:
Duct tape will work.

I'd recommend moongel though. It's removable and doesn't leave a mess or residue on the head.

Remember too that the resonance or overtones you hear may be annoying to you, but to the audience your kit will sound much different. Sometimes snare drums get muffled so much that they sound too "yippy" or weak to everyone but the drummer. Just a thought.
I agree whole heartedly, moongel is that way to go. but those overtones can be a blessing, you will develop an ear for those things and where they work with time, but my advice/opinion would be to stay away from the tape. go with the products on the market that were made and designed for you needs as a drummer. sometimes the home made remedies are great but in this case, i would moongel it up!
 

shanemunzert

New member
dunkerton12":1fgt2o60 said:
Duct tape will work.

I'd recommend moongel though. It's removable and doesn't leave a mess or residue on the head.

Remember too that the resonance or overtones you hear may be annoying to you, but to the audience your kit will sound much different. Sometimes snare drums get muffled so much that they sound too "yippy" or weak to everyone but the drummer. Just a thought.
hoorah for moongels!!!
 

drumur

New member
Hehehe hahahaha
I'm sure the owner of the moongels company will be happy to hear that.
Meanwhile, I'll use duct tape.

Maybe they should make a moongel head with different sized removable moon gels.
Maybe the duct tape companies should market a duct tape just for drums and start selling it in music stores.
 

dunkerton12

New member
drumur":38ftp92k said:
Hehehe hahahaha
I'm sure the owner of the moongels company will be happy to hear that.
Meanwhile, I'll use duct tape.

Maybe they should make a moongel head with different sized removable moon gels.
Maybe the duct tape companies should market a duct tape just for drums and start selling it in music stores.
Perhaps you are confused about what moongel is???

Check this page out: http://www.rtom.com/moongel.htm

It is a pad that you add to muffle your drum regardless of what drum head you choose to use. If one piece isn't muffling enough, then use two pieces.
 

xdoseonex

New member
a square piece of duct tape on the inside of the head right in the center will add focus and attack whle taking away some of the ring
 

Rockula!

New member
You can cut moongels into smaller pieces as well
The point is to use little pieces of either gel or tape and place them so that the head vibrates more evenly
Use your lugs as points of reference
Stick a small piece by one lug and if it is not enough then go across the head and add a small piece there
That way, you don't have one concentrated point of muffling in the area of the head that is causing you the unwanted ring
Heads with mufflling rings on them work on the same concept
You don't see heads with muffling just in one area do you?
No, you see varying thicknesses of muffling in a ring that goes evenly around the head
It doesn't matter if it is as subtle as the fibers at the edges of a pinstripe or the 3 layers of muffling on an Aquarian
They are all evenly applied and have proven to provide the best results
 

drumur

New member
Sorry I was in a goofy mood...
I just can't see spending the money for some guy's invention, when duct tape will work just as well or better. (or a ring cut out of a head)
My theory is...make the drum resonate and sustain as much as possible, then muffle to your own preference.
I don't understand the concept of buying a head that is deficient in particular overtones before you even put it on the drum (like the Evans Dry).
If you're in a room that is dead, and you need to "open the drum up" you can't because it's as if it has a limiter on it. I would rather achieve the optimum volume, tone, resonance, and sustain from that drum, then muffle accordingly.
If I used moongels, I would probably cut them smaller. When I used to play at Trump Casino in Atlantic City, the house kit had moongels and the soundman swore by them. The toms were dead so I pulled them off in the middle of the set. I like my toms to sing. A small piece of tape focuses the tone just right depending on the size of the piece.
 

xdoseonex

New member
moon gels are removable. won't kill tone like duct tape and rings can. last for a long time. and can be cut to any size
 

xdoseonex

New member
moon gels are removable. won't kill tone like duct tape and rings can. last for a long time. and can be cut to any size
 

Rockula!

New member
drumur":3jinr0mq said:
I just can't see spending the money for some guy's invention, when duct tape will work just as well or better. (or a ring cut out of a head)
I don't understand the concept of buying a head that is deficient in particular overtones before you even put it on the drum (like the Evans Dry)
I completely agree and wouldn't spend the money myself
However, I can see moongels working well in a recording situation or a variety band where you would like to have several different sounds (kinda like the wallet on/off system)
As far as saying that a head is deficient if it has some muffling qualities?
That is quite the single minded view of things due to the fact that those heads have been scientifically tested and tuned to perfrorm a specific task
 

drumur

New member
That's true...I've just found that in different environment and situations, you may have to subtract some muffling.
If you're playing to an empty room, in the beginning of the night, it may be fine, but when the place fills up with people, your gonna wish you could remove some of that muffling.
Then if the band gets louder, that's another story.
It's like buying a car with a governor on it set at 35 mph. It's ok if that's the speed limit, but when you need to increase the speed, there's nowhere to go.
It's just my opinion and preference.
I've played with some really loud bands...What did you say? ...inside drummer joke... and I wouldn't want to be stuck with a dry head when I might need to un-dry it at some time.
 

LouDaGr8

New member
im playing with un-miced flutes/saxs/clarients for a pantomime so volume and how much i stand out won't really be a problem, i'm just looking for a quick fix for these 4 shows after that i get my new kit which isn't a 2nd hand 5 year old starter kit, so hopefully (fingers crossed) i won't be havng problems like this with the new one
 

skitch

New member
LouDaGr8":1jxp9iox said:
Im currently getting alot of what i can describe as 'resonance' on my snare, and i know alot of drummers use duct tape on the skin to stop this, i've never done it before however and was looking for pointers on where and how much to put on my skin.

Any advice will be great!
Duct Tape is the cheap tape you find at most hardware stores. If you don't like the effect of the sound, guess what? When remove the tape you get a nice sticky mess left on your drumhead. So now you get to buy another drumhead! If you want tape, do yourself a favor and get Gaffer’s tape from an audio/video supply source. It doesn’t leave the mess when you remove it.
 

Rockula!

New member
Gaffer's tape is extremely usefull but it is also quite expensive
If you are buying it just for muffling then the Moongels seem to be a better investment
 

RemoteContact

New member
Don't be so quick to act with the gel or tape!

The overtone series of a drum should sound good and flow with the drum. This is accomplished by tuning. Before you slap something on that head make sure that head is happily tuned. An hour or so spent with the key trying out different pitches of the batter and intervals (or lack of) between the heads will do wonders to your tuning skill. The drum tuning bible is where I got my headstart into the world of tuning. It has tons of awesome information and is FREE. It also doesnt leave any residue on your heads either.

http://home.earthlink.net/~prof.sound/

If all fails with that head, try another. A new coated ambassador or g1 or whatever might be more expensive than some moongel but consider it an investment in the art of tuning.
 
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