drum stores must not want my business

spacemanspiff

New member
Might as well make my first post here a good one.

I've been to just about every local music store around Columbus, Ohio. I usually go right after work and I'm in my work attire (jeans or slacks, company logo polo). I'm a little on the heavy side, but with a professional, clean cut appearance. I walk around awhile, peruse the selections and wait for a customer service person to come ask me if there's anything he/she can help me find as soon as they are free from other customers. I don't like standing like a vulture at the service desk waiting to swoop down on the next available CSR.

Problem is, I seldom get approached by anyone wanting to help. Usually, they breeze right past me to talk to some (sorry for the stereotype) 35 year old, scraggly dressed, holding on to a hope his band is going to make it, still living with his parents, wanna-be rockstar. Now, here I am with a good job and great income and wanting to spend some hard-earned dollars on quality equipment and I just end up walking around like an idiot and then leaving out of frustration.

I guess the moral of the story is:

1. Even though there are stereotypes for musicians, there are many of us out there who are just normal people who love to play instruments.

2. If you work in one of these stores, be sure to treat everyone as if they were a famous drummer, you never know where your next big sale may come from. If you don't take care of your customers, Guitar Center and Musicians Friend will.

Sorry for the rant, but it's late, I'm awake and this is the 3rd experience with this in the last 2 weeks.
 

ciltzsch

New member
amen brother


ive been going to my local shop for nearly 10 years now. I even bought my very first set from them way back in the day, and still they always no whos gonna come in and spend the most money. granted i usually just get a few little things here and there unlike joe blow who comes in and lays down hundreds of dollars for a new kit every 5 weeks. i still think that no matter what you look like or how much your going to spend you should be treated just as good as some random douche spending thousands of dollars in one trip...and especially to loyal customers like me. i could easily order what ever i want off line but id rather buy it now then wait 2 weeks.
 

drumsforlife

New member
ciltzsch":1omn08r4 said:
amen brother
I second that! Welcome to DML. When I was taking customer service as a class for my insurance degree, sales and marketing techniques and practices was a section in the book. I was taught to treat every person who walks in the door as if they were going to spend money. Furthermore, I was taught that if they didn't seem like they were going to drop any cash, or were "just browsing around" then treat them if they had spent the cash and say thanks, have a nice day, come back soon, we'll see ya next time, etc.

Usually when people are stereotyped in a sales situation, it's because the salesman/woman works on commission only, and instead of the sales being about helping out the person, it becomes about making money. I suggest that you try this again, see if you can get a name or two, and let the management know. If it IS management doing this, then you don't belong in the store. If you've been made to feel they don't want your business, then they're the ones failing at something, not you. Let them know, they might not realize they are doing it. Also, from my customer service experience in the past, 9 times out of 10, if you let somebody in management know of a problem, it gets fixed. Businesses WANT to know how they're doing, so don't hesitate to speak up and say something isn't right. Chances are, you're not the only person who goes through this. The last time I spoke up about crappy service, I got a phone call from the president of the company apologizing, and then was sent comp. coupons for free stuff in the mail. I went and got my free stuff, and haven't been back since.

I feel your pain man. I hear ya! Sorry you're having such a bad time with this, but like I said, they're the ones failing at something, not you. Take care!
 

Daneman

New member
My suggestion is to simply go up to one of th employees and introduce yourself. Build a relationship with the staff. It sucks that you have to be the one to take the initiative- that should be not only the responsibility but the requirement of a good sales staff- but once you establish that relationship things should work out better.

I introduced myself to the owner and employees of my locally owned drum shop some fifteen years ago. I may only stop in there a few times a year, but they know who I am, and also know my drumming style and equipment preferences. They won't try to sell me anything I don't need, but they'll also let me try out anytghing they may think I'd be interested in- the local Zildjian rep was in the store one day and he and the owner invited me to to try out a 24" Zildjian Light Ride a good six months beforfe they hit the market. They let me not only play it, but were interested in my feedback.
 

rufus4dagruv

New member
That's a drag, man. I worked in a small music store for a while. Though the company was no where near the size of GC or Sam Ash, the owner was a bright businessman and he knew the key to be competitive. When I first started, I attended sales traing sessions once a week that would last from 2 to 4 hours. Long story short, I got pretty good at my job.

Your description of yourself was my dream customer. I let the managers talk to the old heads who would come in. They would make some big buys on occasion, but usually they were just picking up an accessory here and there and wanted to chat. If someone came into the store in a polo shirt with a company logo, especially in the evening, that was a sale just waiting to happen. I took really good care of my customers whether they were into drums, guitars, live sound, whatever, and I made sure that when the left, regardless if they made a purchase or not, they were going to ask for me specifically when they came back.

It's a shame that these smaller retailers aren't pushing the customer service aspect harder. When it comes down to it, that's what's going to earn them their customers money. Good luck to you sir and when you finally find a place to buy your dream kit, post some pics in the Show us your kit! section.
 

SGarrett

New member
I've been a drum salesman and while there's no excuse for poor customer service I absolutely can not stand customers who won't open their mouths. If you want help, ask for it. Don't stand there and expect to waited on hand and foot by someone who barely clears minimum wage. Contrary to popular belief, those commission hungry vultures (drum salesmen) don't make jack because of how deeply discounted drums and drum accessories are. You never know if that scraggly guy hasn't been there every day for the last week already working with a salesperson. Cut sales people a break, they want to eat and be able to afford drum gear too and that's really hard with how little money they make. I sold close to $250,000 worth of merch in one year and never made more than $1400 in any month of that year. In fact, I sold a $7k kit, back when a 5 piece DW ran around $2.5-3k, and my commission was considerably less than $100. A step further, drum heads and drum sticks provide the highest commission percentage and kits the lowest. I wasn't able to afford the gear that I was selling until I left that place. So ask yourself if that salesperson is really that greedy or if they're under pressure from above to move more kits and make the store more money. Because let me tell you that the vast majority of consumers today only care about where they can get the best price. They'll come in to pick a salesman's brain clean and then head over to GC to buy, completely wasting said salesman's time. More often than not it's the professional dressed guys who do that because heaven forbid they ask the salesman to price match when that salesman should be able to read their mind and know that a price match is needed. The scraggly guys tend to just walk around and play with things while asking a million questions and messing everything up.

A good salesman treats every customer like they can afford to buy the store out but at some point they still have to make a choice which customer to help and then stick with it. How would you feel if you were talking to someone for almost an hour and then someone comes in who's better dressed and the salesman walks away from you to talk to them? In essence, that's what you just complained about not happening only you were the better dressed person.

Anyway, I'm done ranting. I'm tired of both bad salespeople and bad customers.
 

spacemanspiff

New member
SGarrett":2jgiofl5 said:
I've been a drum salesman and while there's no excuse for poor customer service I absolutely can not stand customers who won't open their mouths. If you want help, ask for it. Don't stand there and expect to waited on hand and foot by someone who barely clears minimum wage. Contrary to popular belief, those commission hungry vultures (drum salesmen) don't make jack because of how deeply discounted drums and drum accessories are. You never know if that scraggly guy hasn't been there every day for the last week already working with a salesperson. Cut sales people a break, they want to eat and be able to afford drum gear too and that's really hard with how little money they make. I sold close to $250,000 worth of merch in one year and never made more than $1400 in any month of that year. In fact, I sold a $7k kit, back when a 5 piece DW ran around $2.5-3k, and my commission was considerably less than $100. A step further, drum heads and drum sticks provide the highest commission percentage and kits the lowest. I wasn't able to afford the gear that I was selling until I left that place. So ask yourself if that salesperson is really that greedy or if they're under pressure from above to move more kits and make the store more money. Because let me tell you that the vast majority of consumers today only care about where they can get the best price. They'll come in to pick a salesman's brain clean and then head over to GC to buy, completely wasting said salesman's time. More often than not it's the professional dressed guys who do that because heaven forbid they ask the salesman to price match when that salesman should be able to read their mind and know that a price match is needed. The scraggly guys tend to just walk around and play with things while asking a million questions and messing everything up.

A good salesman treats every customer like they can afford to buy the store out but at some point they still have to make a choice which customer to help and then stick with it. How would you feel if you were talking to someone for almost an hour and then someone comes in who's better dressed and the salesman walks away from you to talk to them? In essence, that's what you just complained about not happening only you were the better dressed person.

Anyway, I'm done ranting. I'm tired of both bad salespeople and bad customers.
I agree with most of your post. There are many customers who come into stores, jack around for an hour and waste salespersons time, just to leave because they were trying to kill an hour in their day. Fortunately, I am not one of those customers. I usually come in for a purpose and that is to spend some money. I'm all for supporting the local drum shops over the large retailers as long as I get the same service anyone else would get.

I am in no way advocating that someone should step away from a customer in order to service another. What I would like to see is that they send another CSR my way if they see that I've been browsing the selections. If a CSR is not available, then a manager needs to step in and try to help. Even if there is no one else available, the CSR talking to the other customer can excuse himself for just one minute, walk over to me and tell me he's with someone but he acknowledges my presence and as soon as he's done with the other customer, he'll be right with me. I'd be fine with that. It's complete ignorance to the fact that I am in the store is what bothers me.

BTW, I work on commission too in my business, so a $500 sale to me is just as important as the $5,000 sale. You never know when the $5,000 sale may be a one time thing and the $500 sale becomes your customer for life.
 

dave lynch

New member
I feel it's important just go up and begin asking the questions you have..I also believe it's very important for the salesperson to approach a customer...It should be one or the other..Who ever is available 1st.....Example: I go into a store and all the sales people are busy so I begin looking around or checking something out..I'll keep my eyes open for the next available rep..When I see one I'll approach that person immediately, but at the same time I may not be looking at that time so I believe that the rep should approach me immediately...Now I must admit that when someone establishes a relationship with a certain salesperson and the person walks in, sometimes they'll get attention 1st...With me I have this one guy I deal with and I'll let him know it's ok to help someone that was there before me and I'll wait..When I'm in a hurry sometimes I'll call before I go down to give him a warning and let him know what I'm comming for..Like a drum head..He'll pre-pull some heads for me to pick from (I check out each drum head before I buy one..just like rolling sticks) and our transaction is usualy fast that way and it gives other folks service sooner..If you're new the sales person/s need to react quickly no matter what you look like...they'll learn about you and then know if you're a constant waste of time or a real buyer...I've been involved with cusomer service basicly all my life and if a salesperson wants to make money they need to know how to react and be methodical steady but fast and accurate, helpful and know the product that they are selling for best results..oh and friendly with a heart helps big time....as the customer you're the one spending the doe so just go ahead and let em know it ( with respect of course )...A store will not survive without customers..!!
 

m

New member
I have yet to find many employees (I hesitate to call them more than a 'register-operator') at most stores that actually know anything about gear anyway. I suppose my region isn't typical, but at the stores here the staff turnover is phenomenal; if I go in every two months I never see the same employees. Anywho, even the seasoned road-pros who may be running the dept rarely know much about contemporary gear.

I basically do all my research ahead of time, mostly online. If I'm heading into the store, I already know what I need to about the gear, and just want to buy it or try it. I'm sure in other areas it's a totally different situation, and it must be great to be able to go into a store and get some actual help and advice from the staff. But I just don't expect it anymore. And to you guys on here who work at such stores, I think it's really cool that you participate on forums and keep up with what's going on out there. Wish we had some like you down south...

Now, if you're having trouble actually getting someone to handle your transaction, well- I'm not sure what you can do about that other than to start flashin' the cash~
 

FelterSkelter

New member
Customer service is very draining. It usually only takes a small amount of time before you become jaded. I'm good about keeping my balance. One thing I don't care for is when someone asks me a question to then question my answer. I don't need to be tested. I know a considerable amount about all the inventory in my store and I'm more than happy to share my knowledge. But CSRs don't need another name-dropping, know-it-all reach-around with an elitist attitude trying to put them down for working at a music store. Remember there are occasionally kickbacks and it's up to the sales rep who gets them and when.
There are more often times that I am happy to see a certain regular or semi-regular customer walk through the door...but man there are those few times a year you see someone walking through the door and you remember that face because it wasn't a good time the last time they were there.
I'll stop now for fear that someone may find this and I might lose my job.
These are all well known facts though and we can work together to make it a more pleasurable experience every time.
 

dave lynch

New member
FelterSkelter":3asrkam7 said:
Customer service is very draining. It usually only takes a small amount of time before you become jaded. I'm good about keeping my balance. One thing I don't care for is when someone asks me a question to then question my answer. I don't need to be tested. I know a considerable amount about all the inventory in my store and I'm more than happy to share my knowledge. But CSRs don't need another name-dropping, know-it-all reach-around with an elitist attitude trying to put them down for working at a music store. Remember there are occasionally kickbacks and it's up to the sales rep who gets them and when.
There are more often times that I am happy to see a certain regular or semi-regular customer walk through the door...but man there are those few times a year you see someone walking through the door and you remember that face because it wasn't a good time the last time they were there.
I'll stop now for fear that someone may find this and I might lose my job.
These are all well known facts though and we can work together to make it a more pleasurable experience every time.
Yup..that's why I stated this in my 1st reply.."as the customer you're the one spending the doe so just go ahead and let em know it ( with respect of course ) "
If you as a cutomer has respect and treats the salesperson like a human being you're much more likley to get good service...As far as questioning an answer there is a type of question I feel is ok..Example : Hey I heard that ( ? ) has great tone, does it ? Yes it does..!! well is it bright and cracky or deep and ricch ? Ummm deep and rich..!! Does it still have good crack ? ect... When you need to zero in on something and it's not available to check out and you know the person you're TT has witnessed it, well I think that it's ok then to ask more questions....But to ask something like " how do they sound ? " "great.!!" " Hmmm, I heard they sound crappy !! " That's not cool and the mark-up on what you're gonna buy just went up..lol
 

Fleabear

New member
If I need assistance or have to ask a question...and nobody is available...then I get irritated. Other than that...I'm happy when someone lets me browse...and get what I came for...without bothering me. I'd say that most sales people can usually size up a customer when they walk in....and for the most part...know whether or not someone needs help. If you look like you're lost or have no clue.....then a good sales person should pick up on that. On that other hand....if you walk in appear to know what "you're there for".....a good sales person will probably let ya do your thing.
 

SGarrett

New member
spacemanspiff":19l05zsu said:
SGarrett":19l05zsu said:
I've been a drum salesman and while there's no excuse for poor customer service I absolutely can not stand customers who won't open their mouths. If you want help, ask for it. Don't stand there and expect to waited on hand and foot by someone who barely clears minimum wage. Contrary to popular belief, those commission hungry vultures (drum salesmen) don't make jack because of how deeply discounted drums and drum accessories are. You never know if that scraggly guy hasn't been there every day for the last week already working with a salesperson. Cut sales people a break, they want to eat and be able to afford drum gear too and that's really hard with how little money they make. I sold close to $250,000 worth of merch in one year and never made more than $1400 in any month of that year. In fact, I sold a $7k kit, back when a 5 piece DW ran around $2.5-3k, and my commission was considerably less than $100. A step further, drum heads and drum sticks provide the highest commission percentage and kits the lowest. I wasn't able to afford the gear that I was selling until I left that place. So ask yourself if that salesperson is really that greedy or if they're under pressure from above to move more kits and make the store more money. Because let me tell you that the vast majority of consumers today only care about where they can get the best price. They'll come in to pick a salesman's brain clean and then head over to GC to buy, completely wasting said salesman's time. More often than not it's the professional dressed guys who do that because heaven forbid they ask the salesman to price match when that salesman should be able to read their mind and know that a price match is needed. The scraggly guys tend to just walk around and play with things while asking a million questions and messing everything up.

A good salesman treats every customer like they can afford to buy the store out but at some point they still have to make a choice which customer to help and then stick with it. How would you feel if you were talking to someone for almost an hour and then someone comes in who's better dressed and the salesman walks away from you to talk to them? In essence, that's what you just complained about not happening only you were the better dressed person.

Anyway, I'm done ranting. I'm tired of both bad salespeople and bad customers.
I agree with most of your post. There are many customers who come into stores, jack around for an hour and waste salespersons time, just to leave because they were trying to kill an hour in their day. Fortunately, I am not one of those customers. I usually come in for a purpose and that is to spend some money. I'm all for supporting the local drum shops over the large retailers as long as I get the same service anyone else would get.

I am in no way advocating that someone should step away from a customer in order to service another. What I would like to see is that they send another CSR my way if they see that I've been browsing the selections. If a CSR is not available, then a manager needs to step in and try to help. Even if there is no one else available, the CSR talking to the other customer can excuse himself for just one minute, walk over to me and tell me he's with someone but he acknowledges my presence and as soon as he's done with the other customer, he'll be right with me. I'd be fine with that. It's complete ignorance to the fact that I am in the store is what bothers me.

BTW, I work on commission too in my business, so a $500 sale to me is just as important as the $5,000 sale. You never know when the $5,000 sale may be a one time thing and the $500 sale becomes your customer for life.
I should apologize. That was more of an all around rant than it was directed at you. Too many people think the drum shop is there to be their bro instead of make the store money. If you want the bro deal, you gotta be a bro. Like Dave said, that means hanging out at the shop and getting to know the guys. :)

Sometimes there just isn't anyone else around. I had many a time when I was the only person available for at least another two hours and a line of 5-12 people all wanting my undivided attention, some patient and some not. I'd call downstairs but with all of the other departments there was seldom a cashier to spare. I'd do my best but some people, again usually the professional dressed people, would walk away in a huff. My department manager was one of the three store managers and I was lucky to find him to ask him a question, the other two didn't know jack about drums so they were useless. I can remember a specific instance where there were only two people in the shop and they were alright with splitting my attention. Right up until the phone started ringing which is when they both left.

If you're a salesman, you know how to approach another salesman while he's talking to a customer. I'll describe it for others though. Walk up, excuse yourself to the customer he/she is currently talking to, and then say "when you have a moment, I have some questions for you." Bam, now he/she knows you're there and interested.

I guess I'm more laid back than most in that I don't expect anyone that underpaid to provide my own level of customer service at a retail establishment. Imagine someone who sells really nice houses but can't afford to buy themselves without eating beans and roman for two months. That's about what you get at your average drum shop.

FelterSkelter":19l05zsu said:
Customer service is very draining. It usually only takes a small amount of time before you become jaded. I'm good about keeping my balance. One thing I don't care for is when someone asks me a question to then question my answer. I don't need to be tested. I know a considerable amount about all the inventory in my store and I'm more than happy to share my knowledge. But CSRs don't need another name-dropping, know-it-all reach-around with an elitist attitude trying to put them down for working at a music store. Remember there are occasionally kickbacks and it's up to the sales rep who gets them and when.
There are more often times that I am happy to see a certain regular or semi-regular customer walk through the door...but man there are those few times a year you see someone walking through the door and you remember that face because it wasn't a good time the last time they were there.
I'll stop now for fear that someone may find this and I might lose my job.
These are all well known facts though and we can work together to make it a more pleasurable experience every time.
Oh dude, I know what you mean. I had this dude that I absolutely hated who insisted on me being his salesman. You know that guy who's way too butt-rcok for his own good and can never find the "right" crash cymbal? This guy would have me recommend cymbals, hit them and not like them. So I'd kneel down to the racks under the trees on the cymbal wall and the bastard would always crash a cymbal right in my ear. I'd always just say, "hey dude, that's kind of loud". Well, after the third or fourth time of him coming in a doing that I stood up, grabbed a stick from my back pocket, said "how about this one?" and crashed a nice 18" AAX crash right in his ear like I was on stage. He never did it again. Oh, and the testing thing. I hated that. Don't ask me a question and then reply to my answer with "is that so?" like a moron. I really hated the guys that were like, "so uh, what makes this DW worth so much more than this $200 no-name kitthat cost $25 to produce?" Ugh. I'd usually answer with, "what makes a Rolls Royce worth more than a Pinto?" Some would get it and some would say, "I don't know, you tell me..." like it was some kind of a game.

On the flip side, one of my better customers actually gave me his credit card number to keep in my personal file so he didn't have to deal with anyone else and so nobody else could get the commission. It was totally his idea too. He called in one day and asked if he could pay over the phone for some heads and sticks, then he said "go ahead and put that number somewhere safe so I can do this again." He gave me the story when he came to get his stuff. He spent a good chunk of change with me every month, too.
dave lynch":19l05zsu said:
Yup..that's why I stated this in my 1st reply.."as the customer you're the one spending the doe so just go ahead and let em know it ( with respect of course ) "
If you as a cutomer has respect and treats the salesperson like a human being you're much more likley to get good service...As far as questioning an answer there is a type of question I feel is ok..Example : Hey I heard that ( ? ) has great tone, does it ? Yes it does..!! well is it bright and cracky or deep and ricch ? Ummm deep and rich..!! Does it still have good crack ? ect... When you need to zero in on something and it's not available to check out and you know the person you're TT has witnessed it, well I think that it's ok then to ask more questions....But to ask something like " how do they sound ? " "great.!!" " Hmmm, I heard they sound crappy !! " That's not cool and the mark-up on what you're gonna buy just went up..lol
That's when it's not so much what you ask as how you ask it. A lot of people give drum guys the "oh yeah, is that so?" type of answers like we took a piece of cardboard out of the dumpster, wrote DW on it, and priced it at $5k.
 

zen_drummer

New member
SGarrett":28dbf6lf said:
I've been a drum salesman and while there's no excuse for poor customer service I absolutely can not stand customers who won't open their mouths. If you want help, ask for it.
Wow, this was REALLY a good comment, then you went and apologized for it!

A lot of customers poke around looking like they are killing time, when they are really interested in buying something. The customers that come in and say "Hey... I need some help" actually GET some help.

I walk into a store like I own the friggin joint, walk up to a salesman that is in the middle of something else and tell him... "when you get free, I need to get a few things". I'm out the door with products in hand faster than you can say "bob's yer uncle".

Of course, I'm not waiting for anybody to notice I'm there and my wallet is fat... I speak up!
 

SGarrett

New member
zen_drummer":1ra5mblv said:
SGarrett":1ra5mblv said:
I've been a drum salesman and while there's no excuse for poor customer service I absolutely can not stand customers who won't open their mouths. If you want help, ask for it.
Wow, this was REALLY a good comment, then you went and apologized for it!

A lot of customers poke around looking like they are killing time, when they are really interested in buying something. The customers that come in and say "Hey... I need some help" actually GET some help.

I walk into a store like I own the friggin joint, walk up to a salesman that is in the middle of something else and tell him... "when you get free, I need to get a few things". I'm out the door with products in hand faster than you can say "bob's yer uncle".

Of course, I'm not waiting for anybody to notice I'm there and my wallet is fat... I speak up!
Hahaha. The apology for the over-all bitchy tone. Didn't want dude to think I was directing all of that frustration his way. :D

Not only do I get help fairly quickly when I'm in just about any store, I usually get asked questions like I work there. :lol:
 

Alcyon

New member
I love living in Canada because we have Long and McQuade. I go into Long and McQuade, all the people are nice, I know all the drum guys (and a few guitar guys) there, I sit around and mess with guitars or test cymbals or whatever and nobody ever hassles me, I go ask for help or for questions if I need to. I feel absolutely no pressure to buy and everyone is extremely polite and friendly. I may come in every few weeks to test new pedals or look at the new kits that came in, and maybe I don't buy anything, but the next couple kits I buy, the next time I need sticks, next time I need heads, etc. etc. I'm going right back.
 

Rockula!

New member
I have been selling all types of equipment for about 10 years and have found the middle aged dockers and polo types to be the best customers
Young "cool" kids may be more desirable to be seen with, but unless they have their mom with them, they are not buying shit

I will ignore a kid for an old guy any day of the week

However, I will never forget what happened to me at The Melody Shop in Dallas (long since closed)
On the wall was a black Flying V (with the white pickguard) just like the one Paul Stanley played
I politely asked if i could pick up the guitar
Whereupon the sales man replied "pfffft,, NO!"
I promised myself that I would never treat anyone like that
It is cool to indulge kids and see their eyes light up as they get to play one of their heroes instruments
Of course, you gotta keep the whole "5 minute drumstick limit" or guitar chord etc... but that doesn't mean you have to treat ANY customer like shit
Unless is is the same guy who comes in 3 times a week and completely wastes your time
 

Fleabear

New member
At the only local "big" store here.....I witnessed a similar situation. Some guy..obviously a business type...was in with his somewhere around 12 yr old kid. Just picked out a full stack....and a sweet Epiphone Les Paul. I figured he was gonna dump an easy $1800 before he left the store. At the last minute...the kid wanted to look in the drum room. The kid gets a pair of sticks....and taps.....taps mind you...not slamming away like most kids......on the drums to see how they sound. The sales guy runs over...and proceeds to freak out on the kid and the old man bitching about how much drum heads cost...sticks cost...etc., etc. The guy pleasantly asks.....I'm thinking about buying the drum set too along with the other stuff...but I want my son to be able to hit a few of them and pick out the one he wants. After which...the guy tells the father....I can't have anyone just coming in hear and hitting these...those drum heads are $12 each...and if he breaks one.....you're gonna have to pay for it. The father then politely told the guy...ya know what? Keep the guitar stuff.....I'll buy it online. I wanted to do the right thing and buy local and take it home today....but I'll order it tonight on the computer so I don't have to put up with an idiot like you!

This is the same knucklhead who I witnessed on another occasion...telling another possible buyer...that he couldn't use a stick to tap on some cymbals to see which one he liked. Now mind you...both of these people...the young kid and the early 20something....were both treating the equipment with the ultimate in respect.

I realize there are great sales people out there....and there are morons who have no respect for equipment...and shouldn't be allowed to even look at stuff! But there are also examples of extremely bad sales people....and respectful customers...who should have the right to test what they want to buy. And just for the record....the salesman was not a young guy...he was late 30's - early 40's.
 

FelterSkelter

New member
Some people aren't meant for sales. It requires patience and a great deal of understanding. I let anyone try anything at anytime. I deal mostly with band and orchestra instruments and they can easily cost a great deal of money for even student level instruments. If you work with children you can show them how to use your instruments without causing damage to your product. I hate any store that snubs people by "keeping an eye" on them or refraining them from poking and touching instruments around the store. How else is one to know?
 

SGarrett

New member
FelterSkelter":3gcq4l6w said:
Some people aren't meant for sales. It requires patience and a great deal of understanding. I let anyone try anything at anytime. I deal mostly with band and orchestra instruments and they can easily cost a great deal of money for even student level instruments. If you work with children you can show them how to use your instruments without causing damage to your product. I hate any store that snubs people by "keeping an eye" on them or refraining them from poking and touching instruments around the store. How else is one to know?
Very true. But you have to draw a line somewhere or you turn into the jam hang out and you're replacing a few heads on both acoustic and electric kits. Or you have to sell a kit for a $200 discount because it's been played so much. It's a really fine line to walk. What we did at the store I worked at was make people have to talk to salesperson before they could hit anything with a stick and if you dented a brand new stick from the wall you just bought it. From there, we made ourselves extremely approachable and most of us walk around with sticks in our back pockets. Whenever someone asked me to play a kit I politely asked them, "are you thinking about buying or do you just want to jam?" Their answer determined whether or not they got to play. The store used to have an electronics room but after replacing literally three kick heads on a Roland V-Session in one week they moved them out onto the floor and hooked up a kill switch to them. Now when people start playing like they're on stage at any major arena, they get the power turned off and a polite explanation of why they can't play a store kit like that. If they want to go to GC to tear up their kits, more power to them because GC is a corporation and has an easier time writing the loss off. With their acoustic kits, they've taken almost all of the setup kits off the floor and stacked them instead so they aren't playable. If you want to test one, they'll set it up for you and then tear it back down if you don't buy.
 
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