Drum Recording Mics (what to get?)

CrysAk

New member
Hey guys,

I’m looking for a set of drum mics (5+ mic set) and need some advice for the best ones to get.
They will be used for recording only, (not for live performances... just yet)
I’ve looked on eBay and found a few going for around 130GBP + case/leads but I’m worried about the quality these mics will record at.

I’m looking to spend anywhere from 100-300 GBP.

What mic sets can you recommend for this? It’s for a typical kit, 1 bass 3 toms 2 symbols, 1 snare, 1 hi hate

Ill be recording on a Yamaha AW1600 (8 track)

Thanks
Chris
 

stump

New member
Depends on how much you want to spend. Shure, AKG and Audix make good drum mics. If you are in a budget check out CAD mics.
 

drumbeast420

New member
I agree. You can't go wrong with Sure's or AKG's. I actually use the CAD 5 piece set, and for the price they sound great. However, I have spent a lot of time in my home studio messing with mics and the drum sounds and I have realized that you get a much better sound not using clips (on the rims) and using booms instead. #1 if you use the clips and tighten them too much they will affect the tuning of your drum. Also if you have suspension mounts the extra vibration will be picked up. That sucks, but that is what I have found. Also, I would recommend getting a 7 piece mic set with the overheads or use some kind of overhead. You will not believe the difference over heads make when recording. Doesn't have to be anything fancy, just some kind of condenser mic overhead. Good luck!
 

Alan_

New member
almost every engineer I've worked with used an AKG D-112 on the bass drum, and I usually do if left to my own devices as well.

I like using Shure SM57's for snare and toms, but I've used all manner of different sorts of mic's in this application. Different engineers like different mics.

I like using a pair of Stapes small-diaphragm condensers for 1 set of overheads (earthworks mics will work too if you have several grand, heh), and a pair of large diaphragm condensers (we have some AKG C-414's) to capture the "room" sound.
 
For my Studio I use AKG d-112 (kick), SM57 (snare), Sennheiser e604 (Toms) But I put them on boom stands for recording and Live I just clip them to toms, Audix D4 (Floor Tom) Audix fusion 15 Condensors for overheads. I am a Mut when it comes to mics, But to me, this set up is what sounded the best to me when I did some research. I also use drumagog on my recording. When I record metal/posthardcore bands... I use full triggers. But when I recorded basic Rock Alternative/emo/indie... Ill blend the triggers with the live tracks.
 

xltorocksx

New member
I have a 6 piece Audio Technica mic kit that Ive been recording with...After I somewhat figured how to get the mixer set right they sound damn good, and im sure ive in no way got the full potential out of them yet.
 

skitch

New member
Usually, if you a going to be recording a lot, and I mean a lot you want to go with floor mounted Neumans ($) for your toms, a D112 for your kick and a Sm57 for the snare. Forget about claws and use stands; the last thing you want to have happen is listening to the killer track you just recorded and here a rattle from the LP claw coming thru the mix. You can mic the bottom of the snare as well and you may want to stick the D112 inside the drum (which is where it should be anyway) and add a Beta 52 out in front of the kick drum. Also, overheads are a big deal! This is what is going to add what I call the normal ears to your sound. All of the close micing will pick up the instruments they are on; the room and overheads are what is going to catch the ambience of your drums. Also, don't forget the room you are going to record in.
 

SGarrett

New member
skitch":3t10y2aw said:
Usually, if you a going to be recording a lot, and I mean a lot you want to go with floor mounted Neumans ($) for your toms, a D112 for your kick and a Sm57 for the snare. Forget about claws and use stands; the last thing you want to have happen is listening to the killer track you just recorded and here a rattle from the LP claw coming thru the mix. You can mic the bottom of the snare as well and you may want to stick the D112 inside the drum (which is where it should be anyway) and add a Beta 52 out in front of the kick drum. Also, overheads are a big deal! This is what is going to add what I call the normal ears to your sound. All of the close micing will pick up the instruments they are on; the room and overheads are what is going to catch the ambience of your drums. Also, don't forget the room you are going to record in.
I used to like D112s, right up until I noticed their boingy flat basketball sound. I'm liking my Audix D6.
 

Alan_

New member
I've used a D-112 for years and years, a touch of compression and hi-end rolloff is all they need to get a great bass drum sound....

Now tell me more about this Audix D6.
 

SGarrett

New member
Alan_":p2aw6ti6 said:
I've used a D-112 for years and years, a touch of compression and hi-end rolloff is all they need to get a great bass drum sound....

Now tell me more about this Audix D6.
Probably the best thing is that you can plug it in and get a great sound without having to EQ or add effects. Smooth low end sound and great definition, kind of in between a B52 and D112. Given that, adding EQ, a little reverb, and a little compression makes it just kick ass.
 

mmmmdrums

New member
I bought a set of CAD mics a few years back and made a lot of garage recordings with them. They are not high quality mics but they were surprisingly great considering how affordable they were. They are well worth the money
 

J-rod

New member
i use 2 AKG c-1000's for overheads, 57s on my snare and toms, an audio technica at-2020 on my hi-hats, and a d-112 on my kick.
 

cadman174

New member
I started out with the CAD 7 piece mic kit. About $199 on Musicians Friend. I think they're cheaper now. They work very well. Has 1 snare, 3 tom, 1 kick and 2 OH. I've kept the tom and kick mics and went with a Shure SM57 snare mic and PG 81 OH. Shure makes an awesome SM57 mic kit. It really all depends on how much money you want to spend. Spend $200 and get a pretty good kit. Spend $600-700 and get an awesome kit.
 

ashby

New member
d-112 seem like a little bit of a one trick pony and sound so dated, depending on the style atm i'm digging the audix d6 or shure beta91 on the kick drum for aggressive stuff and a sennheiser 421 or beyer m88 for rock and anything else
 
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