drum mics

skdrummer

New member
what mics are the best for recording and live sound?
also is there anything else, like cables or special speakers i need?
 

Rockaflodge

New member
I have alway used sure, you cant go wrong, Its a SURE thing. lol and as long as its not a $5 cable you should be OK. but I have heard that AKG makes so realy good drum mics too.
 

skdrummer

New member
also, i was thinking a little cheaper, like CAD
i was thinking about getting a 4 pack, 1 bass, 1 snare, and 2 to hang above my sets near my crashes (thats what ive seen pro's do)
so what stands do i need to put my mics above my set?
and i cant figure out what cable i need and what it plugs into (speaker? mixer?)
 

scrubs

New member
skdrummer":3gij6iv3 said:
also, i was thinking a little cheaper, like CAD
i was thinking about getting a 4 pack, 1 bass, 1 snare, and 2 to hang above my sets near my crashes (thats what ive seen pro's do)
so what stands do i need to put my mics above my set?
and i cant figure out what cable i need and what it plugs into (speaker? mixer?)
I don't mean to be harsh, but if you don't even know what to plug a microphone into, why are you buying them?

Here are some thoughts:

1) Packaged drum mic sets, with very very few exceptions, are not worth the money. The Shure set with the beta 52 and a bunch of SM57s is about the only one to consider, but you'll still need overheads. You'd be better off buying a decent kick mic (Beta 52, D112, RE20), something for snare (SM57) and a decent pair of small diaphragm condenser overheads (there are far too many to list, but a cheap set would be something like the MXL 604). You can add more mics for toms, etc. once you learn the basics of recording, but I would suggest you keep it to 4 mics, like you've suggested, until you know what you're doing.

2) Microphones connect to microphone preamps, usually via an XLR cable/connection. Preamps can be purchased separately, or they can be found in mixers, PA systems, computer recording interfaces, etc. Condenser microphones require phantom power, which is generally supplied by the preamp. Before dropping a bunch of money, decide what your primary use(s) will be and shop accordingly. Will this be mostly for live playing, recording, or both? Are you recording just drums, or the whole band? How many inputs/preamps do you need at once? Will you be recording to computer, outboard digital recorder, tape, etc? What do you plan to do with the recordings (document practice, record demos, try to get a record deal, etc.)? Lots to consider.

3) Cables: you can get just about any XLR microphone cables (musicians friend sells some for about $5 each), but quality matters both in terms of sound and durability. Try www.audiopile.net for fairly good, inexpensive cables.

4) Stands: again, any stand will do in a pinch, but cheaper stands are less stable and durable. For snare and overhead mics, you'll want a tripod-based stand with an adjustable boom arm. Tama has some for about $45/each that are very good, but if you're on a tight budget, musicians friend has their own branded model that they sell in packs for cheap - quality is questionable. If you have weights/sandbags, you can always drape them over the base of the mic stand for added stability - you don't want your newly purchased mics falling to the floor.

Google the Project Studio Handbook for tons of articles on the ins and outs of recording.

Good luck.
 

skdrummer

New member
well it didnt look like it had the same output as regular mics and guitars
i was planning on pluging it into a mixer so that i dont hav to buy a poweramp and a mixer for my whole band
we are just now starting to record so i dont know anything about this stuff
edit: i think we need a 8-10 channel mixer that can has a usb output
 

Rockaflodge

New member
WOW Scrubs! You know your Shit!

Did you ever work in a studio?...I was a studio engineer for two years at ardent studios in Memphis TN.(Three doors down,ZZ Top) to name a few. I learned all about mics,cables,mixers,preamps,phatom power,protools. And I could have not said it better my self. it just makes me worder if you ever worked in a studio.
 

Rockaflodge

New member
I would get atleast a 12 channel, and are you recording this you self, and if you are what recording program are you going to use, and how are you going to set it up. are all your drums going in to the mixer but only one signal going to the recording program or is all the drum mics running seperate signal in to the recording program or do you have something old like a anolog track recorder. just wordering.
 

skdrummer

New member
i'm either going to use adobe audition if i can get it working, or audacity
we (my band) are gonna try to record each instrument individually and then all together, and we will see which sounds better
were probably not gonna get this untill we write a few more songs, but im trying to find out what we need to get now
 

scrubs

New member
skdrummer":mc110j7r said:
would this be a good mixer if we needed to record:
2 guitars
1 bass
4 drum mics
and 1-3 vocal mics
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/ ... sku=630204

also, would it be possible if i bought 2 of these http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/ ... sku=452055
and put them on a rack system?
The problem with the USB mixers is that they only allow you to send a stereo (2-channel) submix to the computer -- that is, you would have to make all your mixing decisions before recording, as you won't be able to separate the instruments/voices after recording to change levels, eq, effects, etc.

What you probably want to look at is a multi-input soundcard or interface. If your computer has a firewire port, you could get a firewire mixer (like the Mackie Onyx) or just a firewire interface with preamps and no mixer section (like the presonus firepod/firestudio). The firepod has 8 microphone preamps for around $500. That would let you track drums, bass, guitar and a vocal live, then overdub the rest. You can buy another firepod and link them together for 16 preamps, if needed.

The other option would be to get a small mixer that has outputs on every channel and then get a separate multi-input soundcard (like the M-Audio Delta 1010).

Honestly, and I mean no disrespect by this, if you don't know much about recording, your money might be better spent paying a local studio to record your band. Recording and mixing a quality product takes a lot of work and knowledge.

If you're really interested in learning about recording, try to get a job interning at a local studio. Home Recording for Musicians for Dummies is also a decent starter book.
 

scrubs

New member
Rockaflodge":2nhwc5fz said:
WOW Scrubs! You know your Shit!

Did you ever work in a studio?...I was a studio engineer for two years at ardent studios in Memphis TN.(Three doors down,ZZ Top) to name a few. I learned all about mics,cables,mixers,preamps,phatom power,protools. And I could have not said it better my self. it just makes me worder if you ever worked in a studio.
Thanks. I am a songwriter and have a small home studio. I've been recording (mostly myself) for about 10 years. Drums are my newest hobby, both playing and recording, so I'm here reading more about that.
 

Rockaflodge

New member
scrubs is right, There so much more to it than pulgging in and hitting the record botton. the drum mics will cost you around $300, condenser mics for your amps will be about $150-$200, a good vocal mic is a $100 and for the mixer you need its any were from $350 -$2000, a decent recording program like protool is any were from $250-$1000, you will need a good sound card for you computer so it can translate the sound properly $100 or more and then all the stands and mic screans and cables. Dude you are looking at some SERIOUS CASH$! You are way better off finding a studio. My band uses a guy who has a home studio and charges us $35 a hour and the sound we get is just as good as some studio that charges $200 a hour and I know! I used to work at a studio that charged $200 a hour. and it only ended up costing us about $600 for 4 songs that sound great.
 

skdrummer

New member
do you think a regular local music store (anyone heard of reimans music?) would hav that to offer?
we arent that advanced yet, so i am just gonna go really simple and use this:
http://www.zzounds.com/item--SAMQ1U
the absolute cheapest i can do, we arent that serious yet and havent made a penny (well not rlly, cus we won our middle school talent show and got 5$)
would that give me just basic quality? not good or bad
 

scrubs

New member
skdrummer":39jwnbwi said:
do you think a regular local music store (anyone heard of reimans music?) would hav that to offer?
we arent that advanced yet, so i am just gonna go really simple and use this:
http://www.zzounds.com/item--SAMQ1U
the absolute cheapest i can do, we arent that serious yet and havent made a penny (well not rlly, cus we won our middle school talent show and got 5$)
would that give me just basic quality? not good or bad
I don't wanna shoot down all your ideas, but I wouldn't buy that mic. First off, USB mics are, imo, pretty useless, unless you're doing podcasting or just recording your band practice. The reason is, they aren't compatible with anything other than a computer with a USB port. You can never plug them into a mixer or other preamp. They can't be used in conjunction with other mics at all. Basically, it's something you will have no use for as soon as you buy any other equipment. Also, Samson is about the lowest of the low when it comes to quality.

At least buy something with utility. A Shure SM57, while not the best sounding mic in the world, is a safe bet for a first mic. It is extremely durable and, even when you add more mics to your collection, the 57 will still have uses (it is an industry standard for snare drums and distorted guitar amps). Of course, the 57 costs more than the samson, and you'll need a preamp/mixer & XLR cable to use it, but it is a much better investment in the long run.

As for music stores, they will have varying selections of recording equipment and staff knowledge. Do your research before you go shopping - don't rely on the store employees to guide you on what's good (most likely, they'll sell you the stuff with the highest profit margin for them).
 

Rockaflodge

New member
I checked out that mic and I have never used something like that, and as far as the music store goes I dont know, but places like guitar center will have every thing you need or you can order on-line. But I would realy look into have someone who does demos and recordings in your aera befor you spend cash on gear you dont know how to work and dont know the out come of the recording, not trying to put you down, but the whole point is to have a good sounding demo, people will judge you on how good you demo is and if it sounds bad then you defeated the reason you got the gear in the frist place.
 

skdrummer

New member
its perfectally fine! thank you guys for all of your help
i will probably go to my local guitar center and see what they have to say, i also have a friend who's brother is in a progressing band (that i think just got a record deal) that can get me some equipment
the reason i was gonna buy that is because i didnt want to buy a 200-500$ mixer because i am already spending 400$ on new cymbals and im only 14 and just about to get a job so i dont hav a lot of money yet
 

Rockaflodge

New member
Ok dude, well good luck to you, we just wanted you to know how much money, time and know how it takes to record your own stuff, just remeber, its all about the sound! if you buy cheap gear you are going to get a cheap sound, but still I would find a local guy who has a home studio and see what he charges a hour and if nothing eles he can show you everything you need to know about recording and what to get to do it your self, hope its some help to you.
 

SynDigiTal

New member
Yeah Rocka, and Scrubs are definitely right on this stuff.

Im not professional recorder/musician, but Ive worked with sub-par equipment for recording, and its a pain in the ass. If you are using under-par microphones it will without question dramatically show in recordings. The drums will sound like trash.

I just recently bought a set of shure mics. The PG56s on the toms are okay. Im definitely going to upgrade them. The SM57 on the snare is golden. And I believe its a beta56 on the kicker... Which is eh... Not bad, but at the same time its a little lacking. And Im using an mxl 991 I think for the overhead... Which isnt bad, but again can be upgraded.

Either way. NEVER sell yourself short on equipment for recording. You will only be left wanting to go back in time to save your money up or get something else.
 
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