Double pedals. Double Portholes?

tapeworm97

New member
i was wondering if you play double pedals, does that mean its better to have 2 portholes to make it even? By the way ill be buying some Iron Cobras just to let you guys know if it makes any difference of space between each beater.
<a href="http://s34.photobucket.com/albums/d121/aligator3804/?action=view&current=BARKER.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d121/aligator3804/BARKER.jpg" border="0" alt="travis barker"></a>
Heres Travis Barker with 2 portholes on his bass head. I know Andy Dalton (drummer of See You Next Tuesday) also has 2 portholes and plays grindcore/deathmetal.
 

PDP9000

New member
The sound is better with two port holes but he is usally has a mic in his
bass drum so two portholes should not make a diffrence.
 

Potatoe Snack

New member
PDP9000":2d380hxf said:
The sound is better with two port holes but he is usally has a mic in his
bass drum so two portholes should not make a diffrence.
what do you mean the sound is better with two portholes? Whats the difference? I've never used a kit with two, so Im just curious.
 

drumur

New member
Acoustically it would be less resonant But it depends on tuning and muffling too.
I would think it would be for 2 mikes.
One inside to pick up the the beater and the other at the porthole to pick up the tone. This is common in concert and studio.
Distance between beaters?
It's best to hit the head as close to center as possible with both beaters.
 

gretsch4life

New member
when you put a port in your bass drum you are allowing more air to escape from your drum resulting in a dryer sound, this due to the fact that the air bouncing between the two heads is reduced.putting two ports doubles the effects. so while having two ports looks cool it does recduce the amount of natural boom your kick will produce. miced up you should be fine, however in the studio you will be sacrificing some needed acoustics. personally i prefer not to have a port, but for micing situations its a bit neccessary unless you have the MAY internal micing system.
 

Kasper514

New member
I did 2 holes in the front head before, kinda non-intentional. The 1 I put in wasn't high enuff so I put another 1 in up higher. More times than not, I had a VERY "Knocking on the front door" sound. It was very dry.
 

dammow

New member
i have a 24 x 18 kick with 2 holz in the front and there is a lot less 'boom' now from when i just had 1 hole. it looks cool with 2 but i would never do it again. you also lose a little response from the pedal etc.
 

jaydrums

New member
Actually, the 2 portholes in the bass drum are only on drums made by orange county drums and percussion, the kits that travis (among lots of others) use. i dont actually think it had anything to do with resonance or anything like that, it just looks cool!
 

drumminal

New member
I don't think that you will notice any appreciable difference in sound, especially if your going to be miked and your playing rock. It's a cosmetic thing. Personally, I think it looks cool, even though I don't have it myself. It has nothing to do with using double bass pedals.
 

liquidrummr

New member
I'm from the same school of thought as Drumur. One mic inside, one outside and the beaters hitting the head surface as close to center as you can get. Also I use Evans heads and muffling systems and I manage to get maximum boom whether I'm using one bass drum or both. I haven't the slightest idea whether two holes would have any advantage over one. I don't use front heads with mic holes on two of my kits, and manage to get the sound I want.
P.S. I thing the guy who invented the double pedal should get the Nobel prize. I love not having to lug aroung the extra bass drum when club gigging. Also, how many clubs have enough stage space for a decent sized kit.
 

drumur

New member
Most sound techs and recording engineers are familiar with the use of 2 mics. It would be easier to double mic it with 2 holes.
Now, I came up when it was common to remove the front head.
Honestly, if you tune the head to the point where it sing the most, then use minimal muffling it's not dead without the front head or with 2 holes.
I use a front Logo head with one hole on my kit.
 

jeffrot

New member
I think most people do it cause it looks "cool" Balances the appearance out. It doesn't really affect the sound much. One hole is more than enough for the air to escape. The hole will let the batter head recover faster and also give you a little drier less hollow and boomy sound. Without the hole you might get a rattling or vibration type of sound deppending on your drum and heads used. A pillow inside touching both heads a little will cure that. You can adjust your sound and attack a little by putting more or less pillow on one head or the other. heads like the Aquarian Super Kick 2 or 3 or Evans EQ will also help with this. Obviously you can change these a little with the tuning or head tension as well to an extent.

jeffro
 

Damagedrummer

New member
Good question dude!! Never thought of it, but it makes sense. Although you usually get one mic, but maybe for rehearsal it could be better.
 
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