Double Bass/Two bass drum question

drummer4ever1

New member
Bigredfndz":10jrgnex said:
lousypadrummer":10jrgnex said:
I use a Tama Iron Cobra double pedal. We recently did a show with another band and I used another guys kit, which was two bass drums. I actually really liked the feel. I'm considering getting another bass drum. But that would mean expanding my rack to accomodate it.
I have a double bass setup. Can you maybe give me a link to a rack for a double bass drum, I know the Gibraltar rack but it's so expensive, are there any others?
Try Pearl hardware

Drummer4ever1
 

likelight2flies

New member
wow a topic i can actually comment on!
i've only been playing drums for a couple years now but i've used a double pedal since the beginning. one day i went to a music store and played a set with 2 kicks and damn near fell in love. it was so much smoother then a twin pedal. i dont have much space to to fit 2 bass drums right now or i would probably go that route. right now i use a tama iron cobra flexiglide. no matter how many times i adjust the settings on it i cant seem to get that left pedal to feel like the right one. its frustrating as hell. maybe im doing something wrong though im still a big newb to the game =)
 

screamkevin

New member
SteveSavage":13vftfqt said:
screamkevin... i would deff notice you not using your other bass drum, maybe its just me but when ever i go see a band play i watch the bass drum head all the time to see the hits, its usually hard to hear the bass drum at bad venues with bad sound systems, and it gets all muffled with the bass guitar. i watch the lights reflect off the rez head, real easy to see.. maybe i'm the only one who does this??? but i would notice. not that it would matter, if that works better for you thats the way to go. and having a spare kick drum there waiting is sweet!

~SS
Steve,

You're a drummer, so of course you'd notice, ROTFL!!! :lol: I always watch the drummer when I go to a show, too. My comments were that the general public wouldn't know. I shoulda typed it that way, my bad.
 

zerodogma

New member
Interesting... I wouldn't have guessed that so many of you (us) would advocate 2 bass drums. I have become very frustrated with my double pedal (on a single 22") for the very reason stated here -- the slave pedal feels nothing like the main pedal... I notice a lot of lag, slap-back, and sound difference. As good as my Pearl Eliminators are (they are very good pedals), I am seriously thinking of ebaying them and buying a Trick single pedal. The cool thing is, if I ever want to go back to a double pedal, I could either get another single pedal and bass drum or buy the Trick expansion slave.
Anyone here with some experience using the Trick double pedal?
 

screamkevin

New member
zerodogma":2p0fx1oh said:
Anyone here with some experience using the Trick double pedal?
Talk to Zen_Drummer. Mike is a Trick guy, playing their kits and pedals. He knows a lot about the equipment, and although I don't know if he's using the Trick double pedal, he can sure tell you about them! :D
 

vargasdrumbeast

New member
Johnny Cat":1xig29ew said:
vargasdrumbeast":1xig29ew said:
Thanks for the insights guys

Anyone have three bass drums?

Just throwing that out there :twisted:
As a matter of fact I do! :p

But the third is mounted with two stands and used as a gong bass drum, which I love! I can shake the walls with that fucker. :D
Whoa, nice man

I didnt think this topic would get to be so popular

I can see the pros and cons to having multiple bass drums, and I can see the same for a single bass drum

Thanks for all the information guys! :D
 

Bigredfndz

New member
I saw Dave Lombardo and he explained that with two bass drums you don't get the kick back as if you were using double bass pedals on one bass drum.
 

Shalaq

New member
I play with a twin pedal and never felt something like a kickback. Do you get a kickback on your snare/toms when you play a single stroke roll? I have it only when I play 16 inch drums or larger. But then again, you muffle your kicks don't you? That's limiting resonance-vibrating- kickback.
For me using two kick drums is like using two snare drums- one on each hand.
 

Mikkey

New member
The tuning "problem" (if you can call it that) of having two bass drums can open a lot of opportunities. For instance, I tune the left drum slightly lower than the right. For the explosion beats this sounds amazing. (Or at least I think so.) Another problem I have with double bass pedals is that friggin' bar the connects the left to the beaters. It feels heavier on the left than the right. So when I go really fast it feels odd and there is this lag between the two. Not usually a problem mind you, but annoyning as hell to me.
 

Mike T

New member
drummer4ever1":2acbl78w said:
vargasdrumbeast":2acbl78w said:
For those who have used both methods of double bass setup, I would like to know whether You find it easier playing a double bass pedal on one bass drum, or using two bass drums with a single pedal on each drum.

Or if you have like a two drumset setup up like Portnoy with three bass drums two for one set and one for another :shock:

Yeah, so comment away

There are 3 reasons for a double kick pedal over 2 bass kickers.
1. Ease of set up
2. Ease of travel space
3. It is easier to tune 1 kicker and to keep them tuned

2 Kickers used to be the only way to get a double kicker sound but many drummer's used to have trouble keeping them in tune, so therefore the advent and invention of the double kicker pedal came to pass and has proven to be the best innovation in percussion since. Double bass kickers ( drums ) are more for looks and appeal. Granted playing live is for show appeal but keep in mind not everyone plays in a 8000 seat venue and most gig's are in small to non existant stages and space is always a concern for your kit

Your fellow drummer
Drummer4ever1
Sorry but i am going to strongly disagree with you and say all three of the reasons you gave are just pure laziness..

1...what like it is hard to set up a second base drum?

2... if you can lug P.A equipment amps and all sorts of assorted boards and whatnot then another case with a base drum in it is no big deal.

3.. LMAO this one is a smoker of course it is easier to tune one drum and when you use a double pedal GUESS WHAT! it sounds like one drum! It defeats the whole purpose of having two which is to have two different sounding Base drums which you can NOT do with One a double pedal in my book is a gimmick and a poor one at that what do you think people like Louie Bellson ,Ginger Baker,Neil Peart, ETC use two because it is a different sound ...
 

Johnny Cat

New member
Mike T":s1m8s9lp said:
drummer4ever1":s1m8s9lp said:
vargasdrumbeast":s1m8s9lp said:
For those who have used both methods of double bass setup, I would like to know whether You find it easier playing a double bass pedal on one bass drum, or using two bass drums with a single pedal on each drum.

Or if you have like a two drumset setup up like Portnoy with three bass drums two for one set and one for another :shock:

Yeah, so comment away

There are 3 reasons for a double kick pedal over 2 bass kickers.
1. Ease of set up
2. Ease of travel space
3. It is easier to tune 1 kicker and to keep them tuned

2 Kickers used to be the only way to get a double kicker sound but many drummer's used to have trouble keeping them in tune, so therefore the advent and invention of the double kicker pedal came to pass and has proven to be the best innovation in percussion since. Double bass kickers ( drums ) are more for looks and appeal. Granted playing live is for show appeal but keep in mind not everyone plays in a 8000 seat venue and most gig's are in small to non existant stages and space is always a concern for your kit

Your fellow drummer
Drummer4ever1
Sorry but i am going to strongly disagree with you and say all three of the reasons you gave are just pure laziness..

1...what like it is hard to set up a second base drum?

2... if you can lug P.A equipment amps and all sorts of assorted boards and whatnot then another case with a base drum in it is no big deal.

3.. LMAO this one is a smoker of course it is easier to tune one drum and when you use a double pedal GUESS WHAT! it sounds like one drum! It defeats the whole purpose of having two which is to have two different sounding Base drums which you can NOT do with One a double pedal in my book is a gimmick and a poor one at that what do you think people like Louie Bellson ,Ginger Baker,Neil Peart, ETC use two because it is a different sound ...
I really hate to do this, but here's a direct quote from Neil Peart, who you cited as an example, and is FAR from lazy:

"...I wanted to try using a single bass drum with two pedals, to eliminate a big resonating chamber (the other bass drum) which I hardly ever used..."

Taken from Rush's "Roll The Bones" Tour Book from 1991-1992.

And here's another one:

"...I could certainly get along without two bass drums for 99% of my playing..."

And another:

"...I don't use my bass drums for beats or anything like that. My double bass drums are practically for use with fills. I don't like them to be used in rhythms..."

Of course there are now the exceptions to this made in Test For Echo and One Little Victory, but those are just recent, and other than that, what he's said holds true with Rush's music. Funny now how he's just starting to utilize it with playing grooves, but he seems to be doing just fine with a single kick and pedals for that.

He has stuck with the single kick drum set up ever since.

As for Ginger Baker and Louie Bellson, well, two bass drums won out by default with them. They didn't have double pedals back then. As for now, who knows? Maybe they are only using them because they could be traditionalists or creatures of habit.

I do agree with what you're saying to a degree, but to say that the point of having two bass drums is to tune them differently is not necessarily a valid one, and just as self-defeating as what the other guy said that you quoted.
 

Mike T

New member
Of the three i used as a example i would agree with you Neil used them the least..but the point was and still is you can never have two different sounding base drums from one,in the same respect why not just use one rack tom say 8x12 for everything? because it sounds the same each time you hit it so you use a 8x12,and a 9x13, and a couple of floor toms why to have different sounds.

Now not only two base drums but ideally two different sizes Ginger baker has always maintained using two different sizes and with the bigger on the left not the right...i use two 14x20's simply because i am small and like the height of my toms low. everyone must do what they think but the fact still remains it sounds like one drum..and if you are not using it for more that a occasional fill whats the point? to be cool? nahhh when you add double fills and use the different sounding drums in a solo it just makes you more versitile..to my thinking .
 

Flatliner

New member
I prefer the double pedal. A lot less to carry around, I don't like the way a kit changes because of the extra bas drum and a good pedal has plenty of great feel for me. I also think the two bass drum look almost looks a little cliche, my pride just won't let me do it. :)
 

twisteddrummer

New member
I currently use a double pedal basicly because we can haul all the bands gear in one truck that way. It took some adjustment, but I've seen people play rolls on a single kick with a double pedal, so I'm not going to blame my speed on my pedals. I also don't use triggers any more. Trying to eliminate false triggers on a single kick is a bitch if you play a lot of fast double bass.
 

CASCINAIDRUMS

New member
Shalaq":wvqasral said:
I play with a twin pedal and never felt something like a kickback. Do you get a kickback on your snare/toms when you play a single stroke roll? I have it only when I play 16 inch drums or larger. But then again, you muffle your kicks don't you? That's limiting resonance-vibrating- kickback.
For me using two kick drums is like using two snare drums- one on each hand.
I love drummers that have two snare drums.It sounds killer If you know what I mean. Try it some time the sound is insane plus it messes with other drummers trying to copy you live.In the studio it's a different story you can punch it in and out.
Carl Palmer uses one snare but it sounds like 10 different drums
but he's more pro then a lot of drummers
 

CASCINAIDRUMS

New member
Mike T":1epw3zmh said:
drummer4ever1":1epw3zmh said:
vargasdrumbeast":1epw3zmh said:
For those who have used both methods of double bass setup, I would like to know whether You find it easier playing a double bass pedal on one bass drum, or using two bass drums with a single pedal on each drum.

Or if you have like a two drumset setup up like Portnoy with three bass drums two for one set and one for another :shock:

Yeah, so comment away

There are 3 reasons for a double kick pedal over 2 bass kickers.
1. Ease of set up
2. Ease of travel space
3. It is easier to tune 1 kicker and to keep them tuned

2 Kickers used to be the only way to get a double kicker sound but many drummer's used to have trouble keeping them in tune, so therefore the advent and invention of the double kicker pedal came to pass and has proven to be the best innovation in percussion since. Double bass kickers ( drums ) are more for looks and appeal. Granted playing live is for show appeal but keep in mind not everyone plays in a 8000 seat venue and most gig's are in small to non existant stages and space is always a concern for your kit

Your fellow drummer
Drummer4ever1
Sorry but i am going to strongly disagree with you and say all three of the reasons you gave are just pure laziness..

1...what like it is hard to set up a second base drum?

2... if you can lug P.A equipment amps and all sorts of assorted boards and whatnot then another case with a base drum in it is no big deal.

3.. LMAO this one is a smoker of course it is easier to tune one drum and when you use a double pedal GUESS WHAT! it sounds like one drum! It defeats the whole purpose of having two which is to have two different sounding Base drums which you can NOT do with One a double pedal in my book is a gimmick and a poor one at that what do you think people like Louie Bellson ,Ginger Baker,Neil Peart, ETC use two because it is a different sound ...
I agree
Plus you can have two different bass drum sounds without depending on the soundman puching in effects for each beat
 

Johnny Cat

New member
Mike T":17edbnyp said:
Of the three i used as a example i would agree with you Neil used them the least..but the point was and still is you can never have two different sounding base drums from one,in the same respect why not just use one rack tom say 8x12 for everything? because it sounds the same each time you hit it so you use a 8x12,and a 9x13, and a couple of floor toms why to have different sounds.

Now not only two base drums but ideally two different sizes Ginger baker has always maintained using two different sizes and with the bigger on the left not the right...i use two 14x20's simply because i am small and like the height of my toms low. everyone must do what they think but the fact still remains it sounds like one drum..and if you are not using it for more that a occasional fill whats the point? to be cool? nahhh when you add double fills and use the different sounding drums in a solo it just makes you more versitile..to my thinking .
That's fine. The problem I had with your statement is you said it defeats the purpose of having two bass drums, which is to tune them differently. Maybe if you reworded that to say it defeats ONE purpose, not THE purpose. That's what bothered me about it. The only point of having two is not just to tune them differently.
 

Shalaq

New member
CASCINAIDRUMS":1bcg974u said:
Shalaq":1bcg974u said:
I play with a twin pedal and never felt something like a kickback. Do you get a kickback on your snare/toms when you play a single stroke roll? I have it only when I play 16 inch drums or larger. But then again, you muffle your kicks don't you? That's limiting resonance-vibrating- kickback.
For me using two kick drums is like using two snare drums- one on each hand.
I love drummers that have two snare drums.It sounds killer If you know what I mean. Try it some time the sound is insane plus it messes with other drummers trying to copy you live.In the studio it's a different story you can punch it in and out.
Carl Palmer uses one snare but it sounds like 10 different drums
but he's more pro then a lot of drummers
I know it's cool, but I thought of having two exact snares tuned exactluy the same, so you won't have the kickback etc :)
 

DaveDWdrums

New member
Having 2 bass drums is a pain in my opinion. You have to tune them evenly (I hate tuning), It adds a lot of bulk to your set up, it's more of a pain to set up and tear down, and a few other things.

Before I got my new double bass pedal, I would say I understand why people had two bass drums. (the slave pedal always seemed to have a bit of lag) Now, the only reason really to have it is the BLING factor (aka bragging rights) that you have a double bass drum kit.

Happy Drumming!
Dave
 
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