double bass practice...

Shalaq

New member
I think the answer is determination and practice. If you have a lot of free time, then I suggest playing double bass for an hour a day. I use this system:
Start with Xbpms- that's the tempo when you can play comfortably.
Play :
X for 5 minutes
X+5bpms for 10 minutes
X+10bpms for 10 minutes
X+15 bpms for 5 minutes
X+ 20 bpms for anything you can.

Do this for a week and then push the metronome 5bpms faster and do for another week. Try to stay relaxed and focused. Either play a backbeat with your hands or some simple hand patterns.

Notice that the last value is 20 bpms faster than what you can comfortably play. If at any point you can't do a transition of 5bpms properly(meaning not tensing up after 30 seconds etc), or you feel like you can't do it then do this:
X for 5 minutes
X+1 bpm for 5 minutes
X+2 for 5 minutes etc etc until you reach the X+5 bpms.

The point of this 30 minute workout is that you build stamina at the point that you push yourself just a little. When you star for example at 130 bpms you push yourself just a little when you play 135-140. You'll notice that in the first days it will be hard to do the whole excercise, but at the end you'll be flying. Another good thing is that it's only 30 minutes(though sometimes I went for 20 minutes playing one tempo just to be sure I manage to play it smoothly).
These excercised made me play easily from 120 bpms to 160 bpms in no time. After that I saw Tim Waterson use the heel-toe method and.... :)
 

Alcyon

New member
Everyone's happy to help with this subject but seems like there's a new one every week. Try using the search function to make sure there isn't already a topic on this before posting.
 

RetardeDrummer666

New member
On this topic....
I have a question....
Is there anything special your saposed to do with your feet/legs?
I herd you are saposed to role you feelt, asi have seen it done.
 
Shalaq":3pio5km0 said:
I think the answer is determination and practice. If you have a lot of free time, then I suggest playing double bass for an hour a day. I use this system:
Start with Xbpms- that's the tempo when you can play comfortably.
Play :
X for 5 minutes
X+5bpms for 10 minutes
X+10bpms for 10 minutes
X+15 bpms for 5 minutes
X+ 20 bpms for anything you can.

Do this for a week and then push the metronome 5bpms faster and do for another week. Try to stay relaxed and focused. Either play a backbeat with your hands or some simple hand patterns.

Notice that the last value is 20 bpms faster than what you can comfortably play. If at any point you can't do a transition of 5bpms properly(meaning not tensing up after 30 seconds etc), or you feel like you can't do it then do this:
X for 5 minutes
X+1 bpm for 5 minutes
X+2 for 5 minutes etc etc until you reach the X+5 bpms.

The point of this 30 minute workout is that you build stamina at the point that you push yourself just a little. When you star for example at 130 bpms you push yourself just a little when you play 135-140. You'll notice that in the first days it will be hard to do the whole excercise, but at the end you'll be flying. Another good thing is that it's only 30 minutes(though sometimes I went for 20 minutes playing one tempo just to be sure I manage to play it smoothly).
These excercised made me play easily from 120 bpms to 160 bpms in no time. After that I saw Tim Waterson use the heel-toe method and.... :)

heyy yea thats a great idea. im just starting to use a metronome so i cant rele keep in time so when i can keep in time i will start this exersize. ive been playing for 5 years. i need to build up my patience.

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Jum-Bo-Lya

New member
Shalaq":1bi1i067 said:
I think the answer is determination and practice. If you have a lot of free time, then I suggest playing double bass for an hour a day. I use this system:
Start with Xbpms- that's the tempo when you can play comfortably.
Play :
X for 5 minutes
X+5bpms for 10 minutes
X+10bpms for 10 minutes
X+15 bpms for 5 minutes
X+ 20 bpms for anything you can.

Do this for a week and then push the metronome 5bpms faster and do for another week. Try to stay relaxed and focused. Either play a backbeat with your hands or some simple hand patterns.

Notice that the last value is 20 bpms faster than what you can comfortably play. If at any point you can't do a transition of 5bpms properly(meaning not tensing up after 30 seconds etc), or you feel like you can't do it then do this:
X for 5 minutes
X+1 bpm for 5 minutes
X+2 for 5 minutes etc etc until you reach the X+5 bpms.

The point of this 30 minute workout is that you build stamina at the point that you push yourself just a little. When you star for example at 130 bpms you push yourself just a little when you play 135-140. You'll notice that in the first days it will be hard to do the whole excercise, but at the end you'll be flying. Another good thing is that it's only 30 minutes(though sometimes I went for 20 minutes playing one tempo just to be sure I manage to play it smoothly).
These excercised made me play easily from 120 bpms to 160 bpms in no time. After that I saw Tim Waterson use the heel-toe method and.... :)


Well, Is their a certain way I should be doing it because I dont wanna find out ive been doing the wrong technique...
 

strokelahoma

New member
Jum-Bo-Lya":27g9mmec said:
Shalaq":27g9mmec said:
I think the answer is determination and practice. If you have a lot of free time, then I suggest playing double bass for an hour a day. I use this system:
Start with Xbpms- that's the tempo when you can play comfortably.
Play :
X for 5 minutes
X+5bpms for 10 minutes
X+10bpms for 10 minutes
X+15 bpms for 5 minutes
X+ 20 bpms for anything you can.

Do this for a week and then push the metronome 5bpms faster and do for another week. Try to stay relaxed and focused. Either play a backbeat with your hands or some simple hand patterns.

Notice that the last value is 20 bpms faster than what you can comfortably play. If at any point you can't do a transition of 5bpms properly(meaning not tensing up after 30 seconds etc), or you feel like you can't do it then do this:
X for 5 minutes
X+1 bpm for 5 minutes
X+2 for 5 minutes etc etc until you reach the X+5 bpms.

The point of this 30 minute workout is that you build stamina at the point that you push yourself just a little. When you star for example at 130 bpms you push yourself just a little when you play 135-140. You'll notice that in the first days it will be hard to do the whole excercise, but at the end you'll be flying. Another good thing is that it's only 30 minutes(though sometimes I went for 20 minutes playing one tempo just to be sure I manage to play it smoothly).
These excercised made me play easily from 120 bpms to 160 bpms in no time. After that I saw Tim Waterson use the heel-toe method and.... :)


Well, Is their a certain way I should be doing it because I dont wanna find out ive been doing the wrong technique...
With technique it is essentualy the difference between Heel up and heal down playing. I used to be a heal up player myself but after reading an article in Modern drummer where Travis Smith from Trivium said he changed from heal up to heal down and it was great for his speed. So I have since then changed to a heal down technique and it has done wonders for me. Another thing is, everyone is different if you are just playing singles insted of a double stroke technique it is really just about developing a technique that works for you. I changed to heal down to see if it would help me and it did but that is just me. I would suggest trying heal down and if you are heal down try heal up. just expirament with what you do until you find something that feels good to you and lets you play to the ability you want to.
 

Billzilla

New member
When you say "heel down", does that mean your heel never leaves the ground/pedal, essentially making it a pivot point, or that you just rest your heel on the ground until it's time to kick then raise it to kick?

strokelahoma":97n84dwl said:
Jum-Bo-Lya":97n84dwl said:
Shalaq":97n84dwl said:
With technique it is essentualy the difference between Heel up and heal down playing. I used to be a heal up player myself but after reading an article in Modern drummer where Travis Smith from Trivium said he changed from heal up to heal down and it was great for his speed. So I have since then changed to a heal down technique and it has done wonders for me. Another thing is, everyone is different if you are just playing singles insted of a double stroke technique it is really just about developing a technique that works for you. I changed to heal down to see if it would help me and it did but that is just me. I would suggest trying heal down and if you are heal down try heal up. just expirament with what you do until you find something that feels good to you and lets you play to the ability you want to.
 

Shalaq

New member
Right tuning and right amount of energy? You can also try to work on both heel-up and down, back off the power of heel up (so that both are at the same volume) and you can switch if your muscles are tired. It's the same as with wrists and fingers.
 

Flatliner

New member
I use heel up and heel down that way I can last longer before becoming fatigued, trying to work on the heal toe thing but havn't given it any serious practice yet.

Also just wondering if something like this should be in the lessons section?
 

Mattayo

New member
Whenever i'm not really doing anything.. even now.. just get those feet on the floor and think there's a pedal there.. just keep going.. it's like tapping..
i've found training up things like that just comes to me..
if you can do this, pretty soon you'll feel your doing a better job of it, without hardly realising your training up!
 
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