Double bass lessons for beginners

Shalaq

New member
To add something for begginers- Make yourself a test to benchmark yourself. For example, see if you can play straight 16th notes in 130 bpm. If you can't, go to 120 bpms and play for 5 minutes straight. Then increase the speed by 1 bpm and play for 5 minutes and so on. You'll notice that you don't really feel any difference when playing 120 bpms or 125 bpms. That's a good way to work on precision and endurance.
 

Qbs

New member
I agree. Every professional drummer will tell you to work your way up. I also recommend to practice rudiments with your feet, instead of just practicing/playing 16th note singles :)
 

Shalaq

New member
Qbs":3kd22zsb said:
I also recommend to practice rudiments with your feet, instead of just practicing/playing 16th note singles :)
I personally would leave all the paradiddles out when playing double bass. For me it is useless, as most of the time we play them on 2 or more drums. If you practice paradiddles, practice them on the bass drum & hihat or between one leg and one hand.
 

Qbs

New member
I wouldn't they surely will come in handy once you start playing 2BD for example 20 and 22 and IMHO they help develop independence between legs
 

Qbs

New member
Dom Famularo recommends this way of practicing:

*practicing with Stick Control
*feet play heel-down on the floor
*one minute per excersise
*one page per week

I've been doing this 3 weeks now (but I also incorporate my hands) and I've notice a slight improvement... :twisted:
 

Lepricoin

New member
Shalaq":1zgohofr said:
Qbs":1zgohofr said:
I also recommend to practice rudiments with your feet, instead of just practicing/playing 16th note singles :)
I personally would leave all the paradiddles out when playing double bass. For me it is useless, as most of the time we play them on 2 or more drums. If you practice paradiddles, practice them on the bass drum & hihat or between one leg and one hand.

or on the mo effing cowbell!!! :wink:
 

CooknessMunster

New member
IMO Rudiments on the feet are good. All techniques are usefull but not for everybody.... I personally like playing double strokes on my feet. It is good excercise......not neccessarily something that I would do live but .....a good excercise...its challenging and fun.....anything that I do with my hands I try to do with my feet....I try to spend just as much time on my feet as my hands when warming up. Try any excercise that you can on your feet it will make you a stronger player.
 

liamplaysmetal

New member
my learning techniques on drums are probably quite poor, but iron maiden style fast gallops switching to a constant 4/4 double bass beat and then trying a 3/4 beat and then back to gallops and so on and building up speed seems to work for me. the 3/4 constant beat really seems to build precision quite well. I'm not really a particurlarly technical drummer though i just do what seems to work.
 

ganeshgiri

New member
after playing for 20 years, I found myself in a gig that requires dbl bass, so I had to learn, fast. Here's what HAS worked (for me):

in addition to gradually increasing tempo, try jumping around: go fast, go slow, and stay with each speed until it feels comfortable.

remember to practice starting and stopping dbnl bass grooves from regular beats - the goal is to be able to use it live, so practice it in context.

spend some time on single bass technique using only the left foot (or right if your a lefty). I've been doing the Chafee fatback and other stuff from patterns and it's helped.

if you normally keep time with your hi hat foot, try leading some patterns with that foot. I would have been in trouble had this not worked for me right off the bat. (Think LiveWire or similar beats).

all these suggestions are intended in addition to some of the great advice listed previously, and are for beginners. I would not presume to advise experienced dbl kick players. Check out Derek Roddy's practice routine (google video derek roddy) which is a killer. Happy drumming!
 

The MP

New member
well this is my first time doing this i just signed up on this site...but double base isent that hard what i do is i play with my left and right foot using single pedal grooves or i practice with my little pad on the computer excercising it heel down for as long as im on the computer lol which is a while but ive only played for about 11 months and drums is all i think about so yea :)
 

Rob Crisp

New member
I've never really played double bass, but I have begun practicing 16th notes and triplets at various tempos and now I'm working on other rudiments.

I would never use them with my band, but I am learning them purely for my own amusement! I like challenges ;-)
 

clatterdrums

New member
Yeah, definitely want to practice the starting and stopping so that you can incorporate the double kicks seamlessly. For me, "turning off" the kicks was the hardest thing to do, and I still struggle a bit when I get tired. Until our most recent CD, (which comes out on Dec 1st!) I had used my double bass more as fills and accents. On our new song "Turn Away" I switch to straight 16ths in the chorus, but the tempo is only 94bpm. It was quite a struggle at first getting used to playing 16ths at such a slow speed, but it sure has a great "pile driver" effect.

If interested you can check out our new tunes at our web site for sample. Or you can hear 4 songs in their entirity on our band myspace page. The links are in my sig.
 

Homki890

New member
I'm waiting for someone to play a rudimental Snare solo on double bass. I might work up a simple one for a contest. That would be pretty sweet.

Homki890
 

clatterdrums

New member
Homki890":jto5bya9 said:
I'm waiting for someone to play a rudimental Snare solo on double bass. I might work up a simple one for a contest. That would be pretty sweet.

Homki890
Australian drummer Grant Collins did that, I can't remember where I saw the video. Pretty crazy stuff.
 
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