Cracked Cymbal

How do I fix this crack?

  • Do nothing

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Drill hole only

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Drill hole then widen

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Epoxy

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Weld it

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Turn in Lathe

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0
  • Poll closed .

DrummerImp

New member
It's been a long time since I've cracked a cymbal. The last time I did, it was a cymbal I didn't care about (Krutz). Now I have a 2 mm crack on the edge of a Paiste 2002 crash; which I still dont think I did (more so my step son). In any case, I've read various ways to deal with cracked cymbals (e.g. drill hole, use epoxy, weld, turning in lathe, etc.) Take a look at the crack and let me know the best way you would deal with this at this point.

[/img]
 

drummert2k

New member
buy a new cymbal and keeo this as a back up. you can only really slow down the speading of this crack. you cant actually fix it. welding or anything like that will really effect the sound. drilling will create an "end point" for the crack but still creates a weak point in the cymbal, epoxy most likely wont hold due to the vibration. and anything you do to it will really show in a studio. even doing nothing and just leaving the crack you'll get a wierd metalic buzzing. you're basically only looking for a way to get a few more hits out of it. once its crack you cant do anything to make it as good as new.
 

Flatliner

New member
a know a guy who buys cracked cymbals for like a buck and then uses a plasma torch to fix them, its funny cause all his cymbals look weird with little cuts in them, but they sounds great.
 

infiznitch

New member
dude, you can totally fix that. I have two A custom crashes 18 and 19 inches that my instructor helped me fix. He basically took a grinder power tool and cut a semi circle around the fracture. Now it just looks like someone took a bite out of my cymbals! They've been that way for over a year now and they still sound awesome
 

goatatl

New member
The method described by infiznitch has always been the most successful for me; Just be sure to grind in far enough to completely eliminate the crack (Maybe a little more than you can actually SEE)
g
 

MikeRowland

New member
I have "repaired" cracked cymbals before by drilling. I don't really recommend drilling, as it does create a weak point in the cymbal, but it can be done. I would suggest drilling about 1/8" or less from the end of the visible crack, since you cannot see the end of it. To eliminate the rattle, take a grinder or tin snips and cut a small wedge out of the cymbal. You will notice that the cymbal will be a bit brighter. Use caution: you cannot beat the crap out of it anymore, as the stress will cause a new crack to develop at the weak point. I wold recommend buying a new one as soon as your fiances allow, and keep that one as a backup.
 

JC Wonder

New member
Hey Imp

Like drummert2k said, you can't really fix this, you can only prolong the life of the cymbal a little more and try to get a few more hits out of it. But anything you do to the cymbal will, on some level. affect the sound of the cymbal - weather you like the changes or not.

At this point, if the fracture is not creating much of a buzzing kinda sound, what I've done in the past, whenever I had to replace a cymbal (because it broke or just because I substituted it with a different one) I tried to get get creative with it. You might want to experiment with stacks, putting it inverted against a china (like Gregg Bisonette) which will reduce the impact from your sticks.

And if not just polish it and turn it into a wall clock while the crack is still not visible.

Either way and regardless of what you do with it, it needs replacement. You can use it for practicing from now on and use the new replacement for gigs and recording while this one deteriorates.

Hope that helps somehow.
 

phee

New member
Welding works. Of course, if it is still under warantee, sending it in works best. You should love your step son. hehe In any case, cymbals aren't meant to last forever.
 

anavrinIV

New member
phee":20kf3wg0 said:
Welding works. Of course, if it is still under warantee, sending it in works best. You should love your step son. hehe In any case, cymbals aren't meant to last forever.
its a little harder to weld brass than you may think...

welding will kill a cymbal, as will a plasma torch because the extreme heat will change the genetic make-up of your cymbal. your best bet is to find another cymbal in the same line and size with the same tone because your cymbal will never be quite the same again.
 

dob?

New member
ah, its a sad day when you notice your favorite cymbal is cracked... my main crash has a total of 3 cracks in it, 2 within 2 inches of each other. :cry: all seemed to happen at pretty much the same time too. oh well it did last me a good 3 and a half years. stuff like this always happens when im dead broke. :roll:
 

ChrisNichols

New member
When I cracked my first cymbal, I drilled a hole to stop the crack spreading, then drilled a few more, put some screws in the holes, and turned it into a sizzle cymbal. She's nice!
 

milkman dan

New member
Yeah with fucked up cymbals, get creative with them.

I was gunna suggest the sizzle thing but the fool above me beat me to it.

If it's broken, don't just throw it away, but don't try to achieve the same tone out of it, it just isn't going to happen. Drilling holes and putting nails or screws in is a extremely cheap alteration to a cymbal that you would otherwise toss anyway.
 

Aaronm

New member
i've got a mate that had a similar thing happen to his A custum crash, ad the shop cut the crack out as a semi-circle. it stops the crack from spreading and it doesn't create a weak point.
 

stump

New member
Leave it alone and get a new cymbal! You can still use it in a pinch. Cracked cymbals have alot more life in them than most think.
 
My A Zildjian 16" Rock Crash cracked just like the picture at the top did, TODAY. i Have only had the damn thing for about 1 and a half months. i havn't worked for 10 weeks and am skint. Now thats bad. No back up cymbals either.

So I think ill take it to a shop and see what they can do...
unless people advise other wise.
 

phoenix7289

New member
JC Wonder":193krn9a said:
Hey Imp

Like drummert2k said, you can't really fix this, you can only prolong the life of the cymbal a little more and try to get a few more hits out of it. But anything you do to the cymbal will, on some level. affect the sound of the cymbal - weather you like the changes or not.

At this point, if the fracture is not creating much of a buzzing kinda sound, what I've done in the past, whenever I had to replace a cymbal (because it broke or just because I substituted it with a different one) I tried to get get creative with it. You might want to experiment with stacks, putting it inverted against a china (like Gregg Bisonette) which will reduce the impact from your sticks.

And if not just polish it and turn it into a wall clock while the crack is still not visible.

Either way and regardless of what you do with it, it needs replacement. You can use it for practicing from now on and use the new replacement for gigs and recording while this one deteriorates.

Hope that helps somehow.
This person explained this stuff great! Use it as a wall clock, or hang it on your wall with a nail or something, you can't do much. You can do the drilling, but, it's not going to fix it 100%. Personally, if I ever crack any of my nice stuff (hopefully not soon) I will probably do that...

So yah, I hope we've all helped! Any more questions just let us know, and tell us how it goes if you do weld or drill!!!! I'd like to know what happens.
 
i done this with one of mine and i got a paif tin snips and cut a small peice out of the cymbal like a triangle u to the top of the crack and that was 3 years ago .no more cracking has occoured ,changes sound a little .BUT i must warn you if you do try this method watch out for the peice u cut out while on stage cos i got my stick stuck in mine mid song so i had a drum stick hanging from my cymbal for the rest of the song
 
milkman dan":24d7kuim said:
Yeah with fucked up cymbals, get creative with them.

I was gunna suggest the sizzle thing but the fool above me beat me to it.

If it's broken, don't just throw it away, but don't try to achieve the same tone out of it, it just isn't going to happen. Drilling holes and putting nails or screws in is a extremely cheap alteration to a cymbal that you would otherwise toss anyway.
if you have a couple of "crap" cymbals lying around try stacking them on top of eachother to get this really killer "mike portnoy" stack sound.
 

anavrinIV

New member
My A Zildjian 16" Rock Crash cracked just like the picture at the top did, TODAY. i Have only had the damn thing for about 1 and a half months. i havn't worked for 10 weeks and am skint. Now thats bad. No back up cymbals either.

So I think ill take it to a shop and see what they can do...
unless people advise other wise.
it should still be under warranty, sent it back and get a new one. zildjian has a 1 year warranty on all cymbals from purchase date.
 

Brother_Bong

New member
My A Zildjian 16" Rock Crash cracked just like the picture at the top did, TODAY. i Have only had the damn thing for about 1 and a half months. i havn't worked for 10 weeks and am skint. Now thats bad. No back up cymbals either.

So I think ill take it to a shop and see what they can do...
unless people advise other wise.
Zildjian warrantees their cymbals for a year, return it to place of purchase. Hopefully the will give you on off the rack on the spot, and they will wait for the replacement.
 
Top