Cheap Drum Recording

LawNinja

New member
Okay here is my senario, I have no real drum mics, no condesor mics, and just about 4 regular vocal mics to work with, how should I go about recording?
 

stump

New member
Depends on how you want it to sound. If you want a professional sound go to a studio that is reputable. If you just want to mess around try setting up 1 decent mic in the middle of the room and go to it. Lets us know how you come out. Peace!
 

I AR MONKEY

New member
stump":3fl7iv82 said:
Depends on how you want it to sound. If you want a professional sound go to a studio that is reputable. If you just want to mess around try setting up 1 decent mic in the middle of the room and go to it. Lets us know how you come out. Peace!
Thats how im recording mine currently, with a wackkkk mic thats like a three dollar computer mic to do all my recording. Its well placed, and im not too bad with editing, but damn there's only so far you can go on something like that. Can anyone recommend an inexpensive (but good quality) alternative?
 

truemusician

New member
i've done some stuff with four vocal mics. do one on the kick, one pointed right at the snare, kinda close, like an inch away, and do two overheads like a foot above everything, pointed kinda at the set. didnt sound horrible, of course no pro studio sounds, but i didnt cringe at the sound of it all. i also have a mixer so that helps a lot, you'll need one of those to get all the right levels and i had to do some EQing on the snare to take the piercing treble out of it, but it all worked out ok. try that.
 

lemoncleanser1

New member
you can get a four pack from CAD for about 100 bucks. It is prolly the cheapest way to go... They don't have the quality of Shure, Sennheiser, or AKG.... but for its better than drop mics for your entire kit...
 

FelterSkelter

New member
For my tastes vocal mics don't really do too well as far as room micing. I would put one on the kick, one on the snare (top or bottom), one on high hat, and one in the tom/ride cymbal area. The overhead idea isn't bad either but the mics will probably have to be pretty close to get a good signal, maybe too close to play comfortably. A room mic is an absolute must for me when recording drums. It's often higher in the mix than the close mics.

I find that once you use a microphone more often, you can tell what qualities it's going to "hear". That helps when you go to place them the next time. Ultimately, it's all about experimentation.
I've done all of my home recording with a Shure 57 and two Studio Projects B3 condensors. The B3 is a great mic and fairly inexpensive compared to the quality. I think around $250 or so. You might find a good mic on E Bay for less though.
 

Beej

New member
truemusician":21tgmz2q said:
i've done some stuff with four vocal mics. do one on the kick, one pointed right at the snare, kinda close, like an inch away, and do two overheads like a foot above everything, pointed kinda at the set. didnt sound horrible, of course no pro studio sounds, but i didnt cringe at the sound of it all. i also have a mixer so that helps a lot, you'll need one of those to get all the right levels and i had to do some EQing on the snare to take the piercing treble out of it, but it all worked out ok. try that.
I really like this approach. The only thing I might add is you when pointing the one mic at the snare, try to position it where it will also pick up your hi hats. Hats always seem to be lost in the mix when limited mics are available and you can kill two birds with one stone.
 

rfkii

New member
You could use the tried and true "John Bonham style" of recoeding drums that was used on many Led Zeppelin records and is still used today in many studios around the world to generate that BIG sound. If you have 3 good vocal mics (SM57 or good equivalent, place one, with a stand, facing directly at the bass drum (or in the port hole if you have one) the other directly overhead the kit (about 3feet over the highest cymbal) and the final near the floor tom (about 2-3 ft away). Be careful with phase issues, they can inadvertently cancel out some frequencies. Just remember an easy pahase rule, keep your mics at 45 degree angles to each other.

Another method, same kick mic placement, 1 mic on the snare (facing the shell, not the head) and the 3rd mic on the floor tom side (about 3-5 feet off the floor tom) facing into the kit.

If all you have is a mixer going to a 2 track input, it will take some time to get the right mix. If you are able to multitrack, just get some good gain levels and record. You can make individual mix adjustments after you've recorded.

Just remember that less is more. The more mics you have, the more phase issues you incorporate and the more chances you won't be satisfied with the sound you are getting. Most of all, experiment and have fun. Hope this helps. Truly, Frank Kincel
 

pktgruv

New member
It really kind of depends on what you want to do with the recording. If you've got Vee-Drums and you don't mind the limitations they are certainly the easiest way to get decent sounding drum tracks. If you don't own Vee-drums (they aint cheap...even used) then a stereo mic pair would do the trick. Try different positions but crossing the two condenser mics at 90 degrees about six feet infront of the kit can give you a natural sound. But don't expect the rock and roll close mic sound cause that just isn't going to happen.
 

break the prism

New member
some options...
if you have a medium sized cardboard box you can try mounting one in front of the kick drum (the box being used as a soundshield, have one mic on your left, one on your right, and the fourth can go in the middle of the room.
have one mic over the left-center and one mic to the right. i did this in my basement on a 4-track recorder and it worked fine.
 

Victor-17

New member
what are you guys recording into? computer, digital recorder, 4-track, 8-track?

I would love to find a cheap means of recording, but I don't have much experience in the softwares.
 

FelterSkelter

New member
Victor-17":z5fe3i72 said:
what are you guys recording into? computer, digital recorder, 4-track, 8-track?

I would love to find a cheap means of recording, but I don't have much experience in the softwares.
Cassette or VHS recorders are the cheapest effective means of recording. They make decent 4-8 track recording mixers for $500+. Whatever gear you get, read the manual thouroughly and keep it handy whenever you are using it. It usually has all the answers you need.
 
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