career in music

Daza73

New member
i just got offered a full time job at my local music store teaching drums and just helping out through the store but... the manager said they are looking for someone who will b commited and b thinkin of staying there for a while and i was lookin at a career as a carpenter so i was just wandering if i can get some advise as to whether a career in music is worth considering? and is working in your local store a good place to start???
 

BillRayDrums

New member
Sounds like a good opportunity to me.....

Say, you charge $100/month per student for 1 half-hour lesson per week. Do 10 students a day *5 and you can easily amass a good living wage. Don't know what the shop will charge for rent, but in the past I've paid like $5/hr for the space.

So.....$100 *50= $5000

take away $537.50 (5 hrs day * 5 days/week * 4.3)

You get $4462.50 for a whopping 25 hrs/week in actual "work" which ends up being hanging out playing around with drums and becoming a role model for kids.

And if you're gigging, you get to go to your hits being somewhat refreshed and not completely dead.

Of course, this is before taxes. Still, you're your own boss and can make your own hours; I've even known people to take on 60+ students a week but man....I can't imagine that many. I've done 30 per week and that's a lot.

Do what you like, but me.....I'd prefer swinging drumsticks over swinging a hammer any day. No offense to those in the trades (my dad is a master carpenter) but that's my take.
 

drumsforlife

New member
I agree with billyraydrums. Starting off in a music store is a damn good opportunity. I'd give anything to be in your shoes. The music shops here in town already have enough workers and the main guy who has like three stores in the mid GA area had to already shut one of his down due to not making enough money to keep it running. So I'm out of luck there.
 

tomeleefan

New member
I can't believe you even posted that! be a drum teacher or a damn carpenter? what kind of shit is that. I know people that would take the drum job of carpenter and they cant even play drums,jeez man, I hope you were high when you posted this, we forgive you!!!!!!!!!
 

BillRayDrums

New member
tomeleefan":2ylv9id7 said:
I can't believe you even posted that! be a drum teacher or a damn carpenter? what kind of shit is that. I know people that would take the drum job of carpenter and they cant even play drums,jeez man, I hope you were high when you posted this, we forgive you!!!!!!!!!
Unfortunately the mere idea of pursuing something deemed as "fun" and "recreational" as a career move is both frowned upon and not taken seriously by many in this day. I mean....we all know that "work" is supposed to be "not-fun" right?

To many, I would say to go ahead and take the job of a carpenter; It's solid, people take it seriously and know that if they call a carpenter they will have to pay. I cannot tell you how many times I've heard "can your band come play at my party? We can't pay you anything but you'll get great exposure".

That is a fact that still irks the shit out of me but hey, all I can do is play it down and just feel sorry for someone who is so shallow that they expect me to invest my time and energy into making their event into something cool on the promise that "maybe you'll get some cool work out of it".

Here's a rant by a graphic artist that makes total sense to what we full-timers face:

Every day, there are more and more Craigs List posts seeking "artists"for everything from auto graphics to comic books to corporate logo designs. More people are finding themselves in need of some form of illustrative service.

But what they're NOT doing, unfortunately, is realizing how rare someone with these particular talents can be.

To those who are 'seeking artists', let me ask you; How many people do you know, personally, with the talent and skill to perform the services you need? A dozen? Five? One? none?

More than likely, you don?t know any. Otherwise, you wouldn't be posting on craigslist to find them.

And this is not really a surprise.

In this country, there are almost twice as many neurosurgeons as there are professional illustrators. There are eleven times as many certified mechanics. There are SEVENTY times as many people in the IT field.

So, given that they are less rare, and therefore less in demand, would it make sense to ask your mechanic to work on your car for free? Would you look him in the eye, with a straight face, and tell him that his compensation would be the ability to have his work shown to others as you drive down the street?

Would you offer a neurosurgeon the 'opportunity' to add your name to his resume as payment for removing that pesky tumor? (Maybe you could offer him 'a few bucks' for 'materials'. What a deal!)

Would you be able to seriously even CONSIDER offering your web hosting service the chance to have people see their work, by viewing your website, as their payment for hosting you?

If you answered 'yes' to ANY of the above, you?re obviously insane. If you answered 'no', then kudos to you for living in the real world.

But then tell me? why would you think it is okay to live out the same, delusional, ridiculous fantasy when seeking someone whose abilities are even less in supply than these folks?

Graphic artists, illustrators, painters, etc., are skilled tradesmen. As such, to consider them as, or deal with them as, anything less than professionals fully deserving of your respect is both insulting and a bad reflection on you as a sane, reasonable person. In short, it makes you look like a twit.

A few things you need to know;

1. It is not a 'great opportunity' for an artist to have his work seen on your car/'zine/website/bedroom wall, etc. It IS a 'great opportunity' for YOU to have their work there.

2. It is not clever to seek a 'student' or 'beginner' in an attempt to get work for free. It's ignorant and insulting. They may be 'students', but that does not mean they don?t deserve to be paid for their hard work. You were a 'student' once, too. Would you have taken that job at McDonalds with no pay, because you were learning essential job skills for the real world? Yes, your proposition it JUST as stupid.

3. The chance to have their name on something that is going to be seen by other people, whether it's one or one million, is NOT a valid enticement. Neither is the right to add that work to their 'portfolio'. They get to do those things ANYWAY, after being paid as they should. It?s not compensation. It's their right, and it's a given.

4. Stop thinking that you?re giving them some great chance to work. Once they skip over your silly ad, as they should, the next ad is usually for someone who lives in the real world, and as such, will pay them. There are far more jobs needing these skills than there are people who possess these skills.

5. Students DO need 'experience'. But they do NOT need to get it by giving their work away. In fact, this does not even offer them the experience they need. Anyone who will not/can not pay them is obviously the type of person or business they should be ashamed to have on their resume anyway. Do you think professional contractors list the ?experience? they got while nailing down a loose step at their grandmother?s house when they were seventeen?

If you your company or gig was worth listing as desired experience, it would be able to pay for the services it received. The only experience they will get doing free work for you is a lesson learned in what kinds of scrubs they should not lower themselves to deal with.

6. (This one is FOR the artists out there, please pay attention.) Some will ask you to 'submit work for consideration'. They may even be posing as some sort of 'contest'. These are almost always scams. They will take the work submitted by many artists seeking to win the 'contest', or be 'chosen' for the gig, and find what they like most. They will then usually have someone who works for them, or someone who works incredibly cheap because they have no originality or talent of their own, reproduce that same work, or even just make slight modifications to it, and claim it as their own. You will NOT be paid, you will NOT win the contest. The only people who win, here, are the underhanded folks who run these ads. This is speculative, or 'spec', work. It?s risky at best, and a complete scam at worst. I urge you to avoid it, completely. For more information on this subject, please visit www.no-spec.com.

So to artists/designers/illustrators looking for work, do everyone a favor, ESPECIALLY yourselves, and avoid people who do not intend to pay you. Whether they are 'spec' gigs, or just some guy who wants a free mural on his living room walls. They need you. You do NOT need them.

And for those who are looking for someone to do work for free? please wake up and join the real world. The only thing you?re accomplishing is to insult those with the skills you need. Get a clue.
 

skitch

New member
BillRayDrums":tg16iopb said:
tomeleefan":tg16iopb said:
I can't believe you even posted that! be a drum teacher or a damn carpenter? what kind of shit is that. I know people that would take the drum job of carpenter and they cant even play drums,jeez man, I hope you were high when you posted this, we forgive you!!!!!!!!!
Unfortunately the mere idea of pursuing something deemed as "fun" and "recreational" as a career move is both frowned upon and not taken seriously by many in this day. I mean....we all know that "work" is supposed to be "not-fun" right?

To many, I would say to go ahead and take the job of a carpenter; It's solid, people take it seriously and know that if they call a carpenter they will have to pay. I cannot tell you how many times I've heard "can your band come play at my party? We can't pay you anything but you'll get great exposure".

That is a fact that still irks the shit out of me but hey, all I can do is play it down and just feel sorry for someone who is so shallow that they expect me to invest my time and energy into making their event into something cool on the promise that "maybe you'll get some cool work out of it".

Here's a rant by a graphic artist that makes total sense to what we full-timers face:

Every day, there are more and more Craigs List posts seeking "artists"for everything from auto graphics to comic books to corporate logo designs. More people are finding themselves in need of some form of illustrative service.

But what they're NOT doing, unfortunately, is realizing how rare someone with these particular talents can be.

To those who are 'seeking artists', let me ask you; How many people do you know, personally, with the talent and skill to perform the services you need? A dozen? Five? One? none?

More than likely, you don?t know any. Otherwise, you wouldn't be posting on craigslist to find them.

And this is not really a surprise.

In this country, there are almost twice as many neurosurgeons as there are professional illustrators. There are eleven times as many certified mechanics. There are SEVENTY times as many people in the IT field.

So, given that they are less rare, and therefore less in demand, would it make sense to ask your mechanic to work on your car for free? Would you look him in the eye, with a straight face, and tell him that his compensation would be the ability to have his work shown to others as you drive down the street?

Would you offer a neurosurgeon the 'opportunity' to add your name to his resume as payment for removing that pesky tumor? (Maybe you could offer him 'a few bucks' for 'materials'. What a deal!)

Would you be able to seriously even CONSIDER offering your web hosting service the chance to have people see their work, by viewing your website, as their payment for hosting you?

If you answered 'yes' to ANY of the above, you?re obviously insane. If you answered 'no', then kudos to you for living in the real world.

But then tell me? why would you think it is okay to live out the same, delusional, ridiculous fantasy when seeking someone whose abilities are even less in supply than these folks?

Graphic artists, illustrators, painters, etc., are skilled tradesmen. As such, to consider them as, or deal with them as, anything less than professionals fully deserving of your respect is both insulting and a bad reflection on you as a sane, reasonable person. In short, it makes you look like a twit.

A few things you need to know;

1. It is not a 'great opportunity' for an artist to have his work seen on your car/'zine/website/bedroom wall, etc. It IS a 'great opportunity' for YOU to have their work there.

2. It is not clever to seek a 'student' or 'beginner' in an attempt to get work for free. It's ignorant and insulting. They may be 'students', but that does not mean they don?t deserve to be paid for their hard work. You were a 'student' once, too. Would you have taken that job at McDonalds with no pay, because you were learning essential job skills for the real world? Yes, your proposition it JUST as stupid.

3. The chance to have their name on something that is going to be seen by other people, whether it's one or one million, is NOT a valid enticement. Neither is the right to add that work to their 'portfolio'. They get to do those things ANYWAY, after being paid as they should. It?s not compensation. It's their right, and it's a given.

4. Stop thinking that you?re giving them some great chance to work. Once they skip over your silly ad, as they should, the next ad is usually for someone who lives in the real world, and as such, will pay them. There are far more jobs needing these skills than there are people who possess these skills.

5. Students DO need 'experience'. But they do NOT need to get it by giving their work away. In fact, this does not even offer them the experience they need. Anyone who will not/can not pay them is obviously the type of person or business they should be ashamed to have on their resume anyway. Do you think professional contractors list the ?experience? they got while nailing down a loose step at their grandmother?s house when they were seventeen?

If you your company or gig was worth listing as desired experience, it would be able to pay for the services it received. The only experience they will get doing free work for you is a lesson learned in what kinds of scrubs they should not lower themselves to deal with.

6. (This one is FOR the artists out there, please pay attention.) Some will ask you to 'submit work for consideration'. They may even be posing as some sort of 'contest'. These are almost always scams. They will take the work submitted by many artists seeking to win the 'contest', or be 'chosen' for the gig, and find what they like most. They will then usually have someone who works for them, or someone who works incredibly cheap because they have no originality or talent of their own, reproduce that same work, or even just make slight modifications to it, and claim it as their own. You will NOT be paid, you will NOT win the contest. The only people who win, here, are the underhanded folks who run these ads. This is speculative, or 'spec', work. It?s risky at best, and a complete scam at worst. I urge you to avoid it, completely. For more information on this subject, please visit www.no-spec.com.

So to artists/designers/illustrators looking for work, do everyone a favor, ESPECIALLY yourselves, and avoid people who do not intend to pay you. Whether they are 'spec' gigs, or just some guy who wants a free mural on his living room walls. They need you. You do NOT need them.

And for those who are looking for someone to do work for free? please wake up and join the real world. The only thing you?re accomplishing is to insult those with the skills you need. Get a clue.
Very well said!
 

skitch

New member
Daza73":1zjv2avh said:
i just got offered a full time job at my local music store teaching drums and just helping out through the store but... the manager said they are looking for someone who will b commited and b thinkin of staying there for a while and i was lookin at a career as a carpenter so i was just wandering if i can get some advise as to whether a career in music is worth considering? and is working in your local store a good place to start???
Here's the upside - you teach lessons and work the store and pick up gigs. These are all valuable as well as the networking you will doing, so I think that it is a good opportunity. But it will only be as good as you make it! I don't know that you will be able to charge $100/month for lessons. But, I say go for it and if you start high, you can always lower your fees!

Iw ould say go for it and give it a year! See what happen and don't forget to give yourself two weeks' vacation (Yes - I am serious about this!).
 

mattsmith

New member
Billy Ray has got it right. This business of giving away music for free out of some stupid tradition has no place. Besides you get what you pay for.

I also think this is more of a North American custom than elsewhere. In most of Europe for instance, a musician is treated with respect as an artist. They are respected for both the conviction to take on a nontraditional path and for the risk involved.

In America, musicians are often seen as slackers who don't really work because they don't move objects from one place to the other. And because of the massive school music programs in the States, far more people have some experience singing or playing an instrument. So more people than really should think they can do this music stuff fulltime if they chose to, when most times they're not even close.

What they don't get is the versatility of a real full time musician, the excessive training involved, the massive education, and most important the clever lifestyle that is often as tough as any other job. How about also the need to deal with every type and class of person known to man, and sometimes at the same time?

People seeing that from the outside have no clue of that. I watch my family do it and I just shake my head at how ignorant some people are about not getting the depth of it all.
 

mlumpkin13

New member
Sounds like a good way to get closer to your instrument, especially if the store carries your brands. If the money is decent then why not? I know you would rather be in an air conditioned store working with music and musicians than out in the heat building houses and working around the weather.At least I would.
 

Mistajohn

New member
There's some great advice in here!

I recently decided to really make the jump to just playing music, and not working for someone.

I'v edone the major-label artist sideman thing, only to find that the money doesn't always equate to satisfaction. But that's just me.

You can make enough money if you just get the right number of students. But what's really cool is that if you love drumming (you probably do, otherwise you wouldn't be spending time on this website), well you'll be spending your time doing something you love. It won't even feel like you're working!

My advie is to spread out into other fields of music if possible. I am trying to have a few ways of making $$$ in music: Teaching, Studio Work, Writing, TV/Film music production & music producing. I am lucky to have a recording studio my band has set up as a place to work during the day.

The idea is that if you can create a lot of areas in which to draw an income, not one area is relied on too heavily. And the variation in work keeps things interesting!

Good luck, and above all be a teacher that keeps it fun for his students. They will appreciate that!
 

Kasper514

New member
Lets look at security here. Will u have a boat load of students 5 months from now? Will u have them 2, 5 or even 10 years from now? From what I gather it's a position thats profitable when many students are seeking lessons. I know,............. hearing the "what ifs" just plain ole sucks. Heard enough of them in my time. What if "lil johny', or "Lil susie" just don't take to drumming & it's not their cup of tea? Thats their share not comeing in anymore. I work construction full time & it provides security. Plus, unlike many of the "starving musicians" that I know, I can buy a new cymbal when I need 1. If I like a kit I seen, gimme 2 weeks, it's mine. The "starving musicians" that I know needa save for weeks just to buy a pair of sticks or a guitar strap.
If it were me, I'd ask the shop owner if he can provide good or atleast decent pay when there may be a lack in students. If not, I know where my decision would lay. But only u can decide whats good for you.
 

drummert2k

New member
i'll add my 2 coppers to this one.

this sounds like a great chance for you to make some cash doing what you enjoy. it basically pays out the time and dedication you put in. the harder you work to promote yourself and become a great teacher, the more students you'll have a.k.a. the more money you will make. this would also be a great way to network and get some session gigs and fill in gigs to make some cash on the side.

on the down side, you have times when you have students dropping like crazy. school extra curricular activities really put a hurtin on some months of the year because of students in football, soccer, marching band, ect. they have practice every day after school and have games or competitions on the weekends. and you'll find that most of your students will still be in middle school or high school. so while this is a great deal getting to give lessons and everything, its not 100% reliable.

now you have a great trade with carpentry, which will offer good salary, more constant work, medical, dental benefits, and basically a solid career.

if there would be anyway to work around both that would be a great thing to do. i've been doing nothing but drumming and teahing and building drums for about 5 years now paying the bills that way. but if i had a skill that could offer me a career that i could one day even retire from with good pay, i'd take it. although i love drumming, i need to do what will pay the bills and keep me and my girlfriend under a roof with lots of yummy food to eat. and while i can do that with drumming, its not like im rolling in enough money to take vacations around the country or go out and buy neat new expensive toys. so you have to weigh the pro's and con's of both and decide which will be the best choice years down the road.
 

FelterSkelter

New member
drummert2k":1s9ejoa1 said:
i'll add my 2 coppers to this one.

this sounds like a great chance for you to make some cash doing what you enjoy. it basically pays out the time and dedication you put in. the harder you work to promote yourself and become a great teacher, the more students you'll have a.k.a. the more money you will make. this would also be a great way to network and get some session gigs and fill in gigs to make some cash on the side.

on the down side, you have times when you have students dropping like crazy. school extra curricular activities really put a hurtin on some months of the year because of students in football, soccer, marching band, ect. they have practice every day after school and have games or competitions on the weekends. and you'll find that most of your students will still be in middle school or high school. so while this is a great deal getting to give lessons and everything, its not 100% reliable.

now you have a great trade with carpentry, which will offer good salary, more constant work, medical, dental benefits, and basically a solid career.

if there would be anyway to work around both that would be a great thing to do. i've been doing nothing but drumming and teahing and building drums for about 5 years now paying the bills that way. but if i had a skill that could offer me a career that i could one day even retire from with good pay, i'd take it. although i love drumming, i need to do what will pay the bills and keep me and my girlfriend under a roof with lots of yummy food to eat. and while i can do that with drumming, its not like im rolling in enough money to take vacations around the country or go out and buy neat new expensive toys. so you have to weigh the pro's and con's of both and decide which will be the best choice years down the road.
I must agree. You'll be flying by the seat of your pants a little with the music job but you are also able to be in control of your everyday life. The carpentry job may offer you consistent reliability, but is that what you really want to do for the rest of your life? Do you want to be a family man or do you not mind compromising your happiness for less money?
There's a lot to consider, but you should ultimately try the music job and see if that works for you. There are lots of contractors in the world, and they are more frequently seeking employees than a music store.

For the record, I always hated it when my parents told me I needed something "to fall back on". To me, that meant giving up in what I believe, which I have still refused to do.
 

Daza73

New member
drummert2k":3rzhzu2e said:
i'll add my 2 coppers to this one.

this sounds like a great chance for you to make some cash doing what you enjoy. it basically pays out the time and dedication you put in. the harder you work to promote yourself and become a great teacher, the more students you'll have a.k.a. the more money you will make. this would also be a great way to network and get some session gigs and fill in gigs to make some cash on the side.

on the down side, you have times when you have students dropping like crazy. school extra curricular activities really put a hurtin on some months of the year because of students in football, soccer, marching band, ect. they have practice every day after school and have games or competitions on the weekends. and you'll find that most of your students will still be in middle school or high school. so while this is a great deal getting to give lessons and everything, its not 100% reliable.

now you have a great trade with carpentry, which will offer good salary, more constant work, medical, dental benefits, and basically a solid career.

if there would be anyway to work around both that would be a great thing to do. i've been doing nothing but drumming and teahing and building drums for about 5 years now paying the bills that way. but if i had a skill that could offer me a career that i could one day even retire from with good pay, i'd take it. although i love drumming, i need to do what will pay the bills and keep me and my girlfriend under a roof with lots of yummy food to eat. and while i can do that with drumming, its not like im rolling in enough money to take vacations around the country or go out and buy neat new expensive toys. so you have to weigh the pro's and con's of both and decide which will be the best choice years down the road.
i gess if i take the offer in the music store and try it out for say a year or 2 would that be worth doing and if it's not going anywhere i can head back to the carpentary apprenticeship because im on the gold coast in australia thats something like the 2nd or 3rd most boombing place in the world so there will always be work here no matter what and building houses is always good money my dad is good mates with a builder and he owns 2 businesses (building and a motorbike shop) and his racking in the dosh has a nice big house and takes time off when ever he wants at the age of 40...
 

BillRayDrums

New member
Kasper514":seu6gqgo said:
Lets look at security here. Will u have a boat load of students 5 months from now? Will u have them 2, 5 or even 10 years from now? From what I gather it's a position thats profitable when many students are seeking lessons. I know,............. hearing the "what ifs" just plain ole sucks. Heard enough of them in my time. What if "lil johny', or "Lil susie" just don't take to drumming & it's not their cup of tea? Thats their share not comeing in anymore. I work construction full time & it provides security. Plus, unlike many of the "starving musicians" that I know, I can buy a new cymbal when I need 1. If I like a kit I seen, gimme 2 weeks, it's mine. The "starving musicians" that I know needa save for weeks just to buy a pair of sticks or a guitar strap.
If it were me, I'd ask the shop owner if he can provide good or atleast decent pay when there may be a lack in students. If not, I know where my decision would lay. But only u can decide whats good for you.
What if corporate downsizing gives you a pink slip? What if a builder needs federal bailout for the overextension of his contract in that development that went belly-up?

No matter what trade you are in, the "what-ifs" can always hit you. Might as well be doing something you totally love.
 

andybfrank

New member
I recently came to the realization that I need to pursue a music degree as a means to improve my skills so that I can pursue a career in music. I have a degree in Political Science, and I have been working as a paralegal or in the legal profession for the past six years or so. I was recently accepted to a couple of law schools, and I have been pursuing this path for the past decade because I thought it was more practical and responsible than being a musician, and I thought I had a better chance of making it in a "real job" than as a musician.

I have come to the realization that "making it" is not what life is all about. Yes, I could be a lawyer and make lots of money, but I would hate every second of it. I know this because I have been working in the field and it sucks. Getting a law degree won't make it suck any less. In the meantime, I have always enjoyed playing music. I've decided that I will do what I enjoy, regardless of the income. This is a huge leap of faith for me because I have a wife and kid to support.

I am keenly aware of the fact that I am not the best drummer/percussionist around. I don't care. All I can do is try to get better. I would rather fail or have moderate success at doing something that I love than succeed at something I absolutely hate.
 

dreambrother25

New member
Of course, you posting this type of question on a drum forum, you're going to get the replies to be a drum teacher. But, you posting it here also shows what you really want to do in first place.

Still, only you know all the factors involved. Your responsibilities, finances, your family, education, skill level, ability to TEACH with students(despite what you're teaching)...there are so many factors involved that only you know.

I would ask you to look at this from another view point though. Why do you have to choose one? If you have an artistry love for music and a gift for teaching it, then do that if you have the yearning, ability, and option to do it. If you have the same love for carpentry, then also it it.

Yes, we only have 24 hours in a day and need to sleep at some point. Still, do not narrow your gifts and potentials to a defining decision based on "career".

Not all gifts in our life should have a monetary value placed on them. In fact, none of them should but, we do live in this society and rely on the resources of money.

Think about this; the average person completely changes their careers on average 5-6 times in their lifetime. Not jobs...but, career. So, don't stress over this choice. Feel blessed that you have so much potential to do so many things! Enrich your life and the ones around you that you share with everyday with all your potentials, love for your gifts, artistry, and creation!

Good luck my friend and walk through these open doors that has been made available to you. Never feel like you'll never have another chance at something...that you'll miss out. That's not true. You'll always be able to give yourself a chance when you love and develop your gifts and expressions.
 

Waylon

New member
Go for it. I'd love to work in a music store. It's a great way to meet other musicicans and network. Networking is the thing. The only thing that counts in the shameless self promo biz is people who know you and have heard you play. Plus you get to be around drums all day!
Teaching drum lessons will make you a better musician because you have to be on your toes and constantly challenging your students w/ new material which you have to have a handle on too!
Playing the rudiments with them to a metronome everyday is so good for you. You will have to analyze what you do so you don't teach them bad habits. like grip problems etc. It will make you a better drummer because teaching lessons is getting lessons. You will also learn from your students.
It's so rewarding I love it. Carpenters hurt their fingers you know.

I also loved the inserted quote from the graphic artist. The biz is full of those who want to profit on the sincere heartfelt dreams of talented artists.
Musicians get treated badly here. It's like "you play music? who do you think you are?" They project onto you lot's of their own negativity. I wish they knew the truth but the music biz sells an illusion and civilians (non-musicians ala drummer Billy Ward) buy it.
It's a syndrome of illusion and they think they know but they know nothing at all about this ball busting hard game called music biz. You are guilty until proven innocent. For whatever reason musicians in the states are not appreciated near as much as they used to be. I have quit my fusion band because it's over nearly everyone's head. I play jazz and funk to virtually no one in clubs while nearby Rock Tribute bands are cleaning up.
We have to give them what they want because they don't get deeper more musically adventurous instrumentals. We are up against the illusion that the record companies sell. It is so involved that I can't even begin to name all the erroneous assumptions people have when they find out that you play music. "You must have money" or be "famous" and if you're not then you must not be very good! It's black and white thinking. There are so many levels of success in the biz. Just getting a band together and rehearsing enough and getting some gigs is some kind of success. People in general have no idea how hard and unglamorous being a working musician actually is. You are away from loved ones, not enough sleep, bad food, and sometimes playing gigs to virtually no one.
The only reason anyone would want to do this is LOVE. It's a huge sacrifice being a working musician but others think it's all fun and partying.
It's damn lonely sometimes not to mention the hours and hours of personal practice. We do it because we know that we are going to have some great gigs that will leave us feeling it was all worth it. Comraderie is also important. In rehearsal treat each other with respect and learn the musical language. It is so frustrating trying to get what your gtrst wants you to play by his inept vocalizing or waving hands. Then you find that all he wanted was 1/4 notes on a snare. It would have been so easy if he just knew the basics of 4/4 time divisision. It's a waste of time and unpro.
Enough ranting...hope this helps.......it helped me writing it...getting it out.
Drumn4life
Scotty
www.scotaylor.com
 
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