Building Drums

Scogar

New member
I was thinking about maybe trying this, because I have heard from some that it is a great way to save some money but still get a custom sound. I was wandering how many of you guys have tried it, how did it go, and how would you recommend doing it?



thanks guys!
 

Timekeep69

New member
There are a lot of places to go to get supplies. Drummaker.com and amdrumparts.com both sell everything you need and will do the bearing edge cutting and drilling for you for a fee ( I 've heard amdrumparts does it for free as long as you order everything from them). This works if you want a wrapped kit. If you want a lacquer kit, you'll have to do it all yourself because lacquering a shell with holes drilled in it is a pain in the butt.

You'll save on the labor charges but you won't save much on the hardware. Depending on what you want, you could still spend over $1000 just on hardware.
 

SmellsLikeIan

New member
Timekeep69":1t45q4rt said:
There are a lot of places to go to get supplies. Drummaker.com and amdrumparts.com both sell everything you need and will do the bearing edge cutting and drilling for you for a fee ( I 've heard amdrumparts does it for free as long as you order everything from them). This works if you want a wrapped kit. If you want a lacquer kit, you'll have to do it all yourself because lacquering a shell with holes drilled in it is a pain in the butt.

You'll save on the labor charges but you won't save much on the hardware. Depending on what you want, you could still spend over $1000 just on hardware.

Yup. What he said. The do it yourself places will save you money on the shells and lugs and such, but you still gotta pay full price for your stands and whatnot.....If you already have that stuff it's no big deal though. As soon as I have a spare $1500 laying around (who knows when that will be) I'm gonna try building a kit. I think I'm gonna go acrylic-no need to stain, laquer, or wrap. I love the way they sound. And I think that's where the biggest savings will be. A vistalite or OCDP acrylic or DDrum acrylic kit would cost a lot more.
 

xdoseonex

New member
i'm gonna build my own snare soon. I'll be ordering my parts from amdrumparts.com theyre'll cut my bearing edges and drill my hold for me, i'm gonna get black diecast hoops, and some nice looking black lugs, and have my vocalist stain and laquor the shell (he used to refinish furnature for a living) it shouldnt be too expensive. the diecast hoops will probly b the most expensive part
 

Timekeep69

New member
xdoseonex":j0moftrz said:
i'm gonna build my own snare soon. I'll be ordering my parts from amdrumparts.com theyre'll cut my bearing edges and drill my hold for me, i'm gonna get black diecast hoops, and some nice looking black lugs, and have my vocalist stain and laquor the shell (he used to refinish furnature for a living) it shouldnt be too expensive. the diecast hoops will probly b the most expensive part

No offense but you're assembling your snare drum, not building it.
 

zen_drummer

New member
Timekeep69":2omdst5o said:
No offense but you're assembling your snare drum, not building it.

That's a fact.... of course, lots of custom builders are really just assemblers when you consider what's really going on.
 

Timekeep69

New member
zen_drummer":1pa9seif said:
Timekeep69":1pa9seif said:
No offense but you're assembling your snare drum, not building it.

That's a fact.... of course, lots of custom builders are really just assemblers when you consider what's really going on.

Yes and no. Drilling straight holes and cutting good bearing edges isn't as easy as one would think.

I don't agree with the argument that because most companies use Keller Shells they're all the same or that it's not really building. Carpenters don't cut down the trees and make their own 2x4's. Most furniture makers buy their wood from someone else too.

To have someone else apply a finish, cut the edges and drill the holes is really the same as buying a desk from Wal-mart and saying that you built it and in reality all you did was take it out of the box and assembled it.

Same thing.
 

druming=life

New member
^ that is a flawless point in my opinion, kudos to you, what happens to the look of the wood if you only apply a stain and nothing else, would its just look dull?
 

HeaveyDrummer

New member
Lol, thats somewhat true, it is basically assembling, not making.

What me and my grandad did was baught a long, straight piece of maple, soaked it in the bath-tub, made a mold, turned it around that mold to make the sphere, I think we got around 5 times maybe, but then reinforced it with pieces of wood, then drilled all the holes, put the edges on, then assembled Lugs I had lying around my house, It's almost done, we decided to paint it. But we still gotta make something, we are going to make the mounting pit :p so, it's going to be fun..

Me and my grandad have also made um, 6 pairs of Drumsticks, they are my favorite sticks to use.

So, if thats not drum building I dunno what is.
I'll also put pictures up soon of the drum..
 

Timekeep69

New member
HeaveyDrummer":2yftl0bw said:
Lol, thats somewhat true, it is basically assembling, not making.

What me and my grandad did was baught a long, straight piece of maple, soaked it in the bath-tub, made a mold, turned it around that mold to make the sphere, I think we got around 5 times maybe, but then reinforced it with pieces of wood, then drilled all the holes, put the edges on, then assembled Lugs I had lying around my house, It's almost done, we decided to paint it. But we still gotta make something, we are going to make the mounting pit :p so, it's going to be fun..

Me and my grandad have also made um, 6 pairs of Drumsticks, they are my favorite sticks to use.

So, if thats not drum building I dunno what is.
I'll also put pictures up soon of the drum..

Now THAT'S drum making!
 

xrftsx

New member
yeah when i build i go through Bestdrumdeals.com
they do any cutting or drilling. so i get to do all of the fun work haha.
 

xrftsx

New member
HeaveyDrummer":212z9djf said:
Lol, thats somewhat true, it is basically assembling, not making.

What me and my grandad did was baught a long, straight piece of maple, soaked it in the bath-tub, made a mold, turned it around that mold to make the sphere, I think we got around 5 times maybe, but then reinforced it with pieces of wood, then drilled all the holes, put the edges on, then assembled Lugs I had lying around my house, It's almost done, we decided to paint it. But we still gotta make something, we are going to make the mounting pit :p so, it's going to be fun..

Me and my grandad have also made um, 6 pairs of Drumsticks, they are my favorite sticks to use.

So, if thats not drum building I dunno what is.
I'll also put pictures up soon of the drum..

dude you gotta tell me what ply you used and what you used for a mold cause now i wanna build a 20x20 kick
 

Timekeep69

New member
xrftsx":2ua4hg2w said:
yeah when i build i go through Bestdrumdeals.com
they do any cutting or drilling. so i get to do all of the fun work haha.

Is it me or do they only have 2 colors for wrap?
 

Nhara

New member
building your own DRUMS is fairly cheap but to make a SET with hardware, cymbals, etc. it's a bit more pricey. drum shells can easily be bought at a local drum luthier or via online through many shell producers. i've heard that DW gets keller shells for their maple and birch drum set. for anything exotic like bubinga and birdseye maple your gunna have to look real hard or be really friendly with ur local drum luthier but other than that drilling holes are kinda hard, if u screw up once it's over, there is nothing you can do to save that shell and u just lost [insert price tag of shell here] bucks. always measure twice and then measure again, you don't wanna screw anything up
 

zen_drummer

New member
HeaveyDrummer":yunwcwch said:
Lol, thats somewhat true, it is basically assembling, not making.

What me and my grandad did was baught a long, straight piece of maple, soaked it in the bath-tub, made a mold, turned it around that mold to make the sphere, I think we got around 5 times maybe, but then reinforced it with pieces of wood, then drilled all the holes, put the edges on, then assembled Lugs I had lying around my house, It's almost done, we decided to paint it. But we still gotta make something, we are going to make the mounting pit :p so, it's going to be fun.

to make a single board into a 5 ply drum, you would need to start with a board that is over 18 feet long... that's one heck of a bathtub you and your grandpa have!
 

TommyT

New member
I "put together" a 16"X26" kick drum recently with parts I got from Precision drums out of NY. I wrapped it silver sparkle and it just rocks. I am constantly hitting pawn shops and yard sales for old junky drums, shells, etc to experiment on as far as cutting bearing edges...a fun hobby! I get better with every drum I tweak...who knows, when I get old and retire from the road, my dream is to have a little drum shop somewhere.
 

scotttyrcha

New member
I've had the experience of building a drum kit and I thought it was great! I'll only say, to do it right, it's more expensive than you may think. If you use top notch parts, cast hoops, expensive lugs, keller shells, suspened tom mounts, kick drum legs, floor tom legs, etc; can all end up costing a pretty penny once you're done. It all comes down to personnel preference. Once I completed the kit I used it for a while, but it ended up not really being my dream kit, so I ended up selling it for a loss because eventhough I used all name brand componants to put the kit together, There wasn't a DW or Yamaha or Pork Pie name attached to the kit. But if you want to build a kit, that you are planning on keeping and using and can afford it, I'd recommend the experience of building a kit yourself.

Just my 2 cents :D
 

nichanks

New member
i went to a tech college and took the guitar building courses. i've built an acoustic guitar, electric bass, and just recently i built my own drumset.

basically, anyone with some basic wood working skills and common sense can drill the holes and assemble the drum. the real skill comes in the finishing. finishing wood is by far the most difficult step in any wood working project especially finishing musical instruments because of the high level of professionalism in musical instrument finishing.

i spent some time working as a carpenter and most custom carpenters don't even do their own finishing. they hire a professional finisher to do that part. in most cases carpentry and wood finishing are two different fields of work but in instrument building the instrument builder needs to know both trades. not an easy thing.

before even thinking about finishing anything. i would buy Bob Flexner's book "Wood Finishing". read that and then decide if you want to finish a drumset. he is, in my opinion, the doctor of wood finishing. he easily explains everything about wood finishing with all the different techniques and finishes. he explains the differences and the good and bad aspects of each type of finish and all the different techniques involved in applying a finish. you can't just get a brush and start slapping on finish and expect it to look like your high gloss DW set nor get yourself a spray gun and thing everything will go hunky dory cause you know how to use a spray can of paint.

wood finishing is a long and tedious process. to get a high gloss piano finish can take up to a month depending on what type of finish you use and how you apply it. then the process doesn't stop there. after a finish is applied and dried out there is a process in which the newly applied finish needs to be wet sanded and then buffed out.

buy the book, he explains it all.
 

joejoeplaysdrums

New member
building your own drumset in a pain in the ass. i've built three of them from scratch - done the bearing edges (including snare drums) drilled the holes and did the stain/lacquering. there's a lot of times when you're not 100% sure if you did it right but when you get it all done it looks great and sounds fantastic. i strongly recommend every drummer build at least one snare drum in their life. i've gotten all my stuff from precision drum co in new york - fantastic folks there. you should all check it out.
 
Top