Bass drum spring tension

RFLTenors

New member
Bass drum spring tension? Very tight verses very loose. What are the "pros" doing to get really fast action? My pedals hardly have any tension at all. Would my feet be faster if I cranked the tension up?
 

ddrumbum

New member
This is what zen drummer told me, and trust me the guy knows what he is talking about, so give it a try.

The way I would go about setting up a pedal with three springs:

1) Setup the primary pedal so it feels good, using the one spring of course, as it's your only choice. Beater Travel should be long enough to get the power you need for single kick playing.
2) Play for a few days with only the primary pedal and make sure it's dialed in to feel good. Get used to it as a single.
3) Setup the second pedal by matching the settings of the first pedal, using only one spring, the one on the primary side.
4) Add the second spring on the second pedal and dial in JUST enough to put a little tension on the axle, this will hold the U joints tight and prevent "lag".
 

Shalaq

New member
RFLTenors":2xsm3r85 said:
Bass drum spring tension? Very tight verses very loose. What are the "pros" doing to get really fast action? My pedals hardly have any tension at all. Would my feet be faster if I cranked the tension up?
Your feet will be faster if you practice more. That's the key.
Spring tension should be adjusted every time you clamp your pedals to different kick. If your kick has muffling and has no rebound, then tight spring will help emulate the rebound of the drum. If you let the drum resonate etc etc and play off the head (as opposed to in the head), then you should try to learn to use the natural rebound of the head. Remember- the tighter the springs, the more you're going to work.
Ideally, we should be able to play the kick drum withouth springs, depending only on the rebound of the head. Of course this probably will never happen ( the weight of your feet etc actually slowes you down), but we should try to get as close to this as possible.
 
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