Bass drum rebound

Ok guys im Having problems getting enough rebound from my bass head i like my head tight and my pedals lose,I have just got a tama superstar. It has an evens emad head on it and i have half filled it with blankets would this kill the rebound? I havent cut a port hole in the front head yet so didnt like the sound without blankets would i be better cutting a port hole and removing blankets and trying it that way? Any help advice would be great.

Cheers simon
 

wmpdrummer13

New member
Unless you have the blankets firmly pressed against the batter head they will not make a difference with the beater rebounding. My opinion is to take the blankets out if ya want a good wide open bass drum sound. I am not one for muffling! I just use some foam wedges that you would use on the walls of a studio and secure it to the bottom of my bass drum head and press it against the bottom of my batter head. The rebound is going to depend on the tightness of the batter head and your pedals. With the pedals being loose there is not really going to be anything to help with the rebound other than just the beater bouncing off of the head, try tightening up the pedals just a little bit and see if it helps ya.
 
Cheers Pal
I think maybe too much blanket is sat against the head i think ill try your idea. i can feel through the pedals at the moment that the head has less rebound.
 

jnewlon_drum

New member
carpetmonsterman":1pn2m3a6 said:
Ok guys im Having problems getting enough rebound from my bass head i like my head tight and my pedals lose,I have just got a tama superstar. It has an evens emad head on it and i have half filled it with blankets would this kill the rebound? I havent cut a port hole in the front head yet so didnt like the sound without blankets would i be better cutting a port hole and removing blankets and trying it that way? Any help advice would be great.

Cheers simon

i put a pillow and 2 towels in my bass drums at the bottom against the batter head...but low enough under my beater pad so that it gives my bass drum a damper sound rather than filling it and killing all of the timbre
 

Brother_Bong

New member
I say put an EQ3 on it, remove all muffling and tighten your pedal just a smidge.
Btw, what kind of pedal are you using, and how far is the beater from the head at rest?
 
Got nuthin in my bass drum. Make sure you have a hole in the resonate heade to let the air out.
Not true. You do NOT need to have a hole in the reso head. John Bonham never did and his foot speed or sound Never suffered. Like the others said a blanket won't really affect it. I would say tighten up your spring tension and your kick batter head. That should give your better rebound.
 

audiotech

New member
I play and record without a ported resonant head. You'll definitely have a bit more pedal rebound if you have two solid heads. Just tune them the way you like and that's all there is to it. I usually have one or two kits miked up because I do studio feeds every week and 99.9% of the time it's without a hole in my head, lol. If I want a different sound out of my bass drum, I just alter the tension of the reso head without altering the batter head, but keeping both heads in tune with themself, just as I do with any other drum. In my experience the port hole in the reso head is usually associated with sound people who really don't know how to get the best sound out of a bass drum if they don't have a hole to show them where to place the microphone. :lol:





Dennis
 

wmpdrummer13

New member
i agree i am not really much of a fan of the port hole but i get sick of all the sound guys when i play out stating man you need to get a port hole for your bass drum, sometimes i feel like telling them they need to get a clue as to what they are doing. I also follow the Bonham method of keeping the reso head tighter than most people do, it really helps with the punch and defeats the purpose of a port hole
 

AmnestysLowEnd

New member
The point of the port in the reso is to get the mic inside the drum. This lets you control how much of the attack you are going to be getting, no hole makes it harder to get the beater's attack. Also when playing live it makes it way easier to control "bleeding" or other sound sources being picked up by the mic. It isn't necessary to port your reso but don't try to lump sound guys into the "You have no fucking clue what your doing" category when you don't know the full reasoning behind the technique
 

audiotech

New member
AmnestysLowEnd":2tj63q92 said:
The point of the port in the reso is to get the mic inside the drum. This lets you control how much of the attack you are going to be getting, no hole makes it harder to get the beater's attack. Also when playing live it makes it way easier to control "bleeding" or other sound sources being picked up by the mic. It isn't necessary to port your reso but don't try to lump sound guys into the "You have no fucking clue what your doing" category when you don't know the full reasoning behind the technique
I just mention this from experience and I'm not lumping All sound guys, just most. Putting the mic inside the bass drum isolates nothing. In fact having two diaphragms (bass drum heads) on either side of the microphone when placed inside the bass drum actually accentuates other outside sources such as guitar and bass amps as they bounce from the heads of the bass drum. Get the mic out of the bass drum and you'll find a decrease of about 10 or 20 decibels of noise and rumble, depending on how everything is arranged on the stage or studio. If you need more attack, just mic the batter head, it's as easy as that, plus you'll be able to dial in exactly the amount of attack you desire. Most sound guys have absolutely no training other than what the bartender showed them. Most know how to follow color codes on the mic cables to follow them back to their faders but most have no idea how microphone placement affects the sound of the instrument from which they're trying to achieve the most accurate sound reproduction. If they had more extensive training, they probably wouldn't be working in small clubs and bars.

Sorry, but I've put up with some of their clueless activities for over forty five years. It's ridiculous saying that they need a hole in the bass drum head to be able to mic the kit.

Dennis
 

wmpdrummer13

New member
AmnestysLowEnd":1z1ejrvo said:
The point of the port in the reso is to get the mic inside the drum. This lets you control how much of the attack you are going to be getting, no hole makes it harder to get the beater's attack. Also when playing live it makes it way easier to control "bleeding" or other sound sources being picked up by the mic. It isn't necessary to port your reso but don't try to lump sound guys into the "You have no fucking clue what your doing" category when you don't know the full reasoning behind the technique

LOL who doesnt know the full reasoning? You must be a sound guy...

Dennis I agree with ya
 

AmnestysLowEnd

New member
audiotech":3ujywhn5 said:
AmnestysLowEnd":3ujywhn5 said:
The point of the port in the reso is to get the mic inside the drum. This lets you control how much of the attack you are going to be getting, no hole makes it harder to get the beater's attack. Also when playing live it makes it way easier to control "bleeding" or other sound sources being picked up by the mic. It isn't necessary to port your reso but don't try to lump sound guys into the "You have no fucking clue what your doing" category when you don't know the full reasoning behind the technique
I just mention this from experience and I'm not lumping All sound guys, just most. Putting the mic inside the bass drum isolates nothing. In fact having two diaphragms (bass drum heads) on either side of the microphone when placed inside the bass drum actually accentuates other outside sources such as guitar and bass amps as they bounce from the heads of the bass drum. Get the mic out of the bass drum and you'll find a decrease of about 10 or 20 decibels of noise and rumble, depending on how everything is arranged on the stage or studio. If you need more attack, just mic the batter head, it's as easy as that, plus you'll be able to dial in exactly the amount of attack you desire. Most sound guys have absolutely no training other than what the bartender showed them. Most know how to follow color codes on the mic cables to follow them back to their faders but most have no idea how microphone placement affects the sound of the instrument from which they're trying to achieve the most accurate sound reproduction. If they had more extensive training, they probably wouldn't be working in small clubs and bars.

Sorry, but I've put up with some of their clueless activities for over forty five years. It's ridiculous saying that they need a hole in the bass drum head to be able to mic the kit.

Dennis
I agree that you could always mic the batter but lets face it if most guys can't tell the difference between a 1/4 inch and xlr jack, how would they be able to know how to deal with phase cancellation let alone what it is. I find it way easier just to port the drum and actually have them get a good enough tone then keep it closed up and only hope they can get the feedback in check.

wmpdrummer13":3ujywhn5 said:
AmnestysLowEnd":3ujywhn5 said:
The point of the port in the reso is to get the mic inside the drum. This lets you control how much of the attack you are going to be getting, no hole makes it harder to get the beater's attack. Also when playing live it makes it way easier to control "bleeding" or other sound sources being picked up by the mic. It isn't necessary to port your reso but don't try to lump sound guys into the "You have no fucking clue what your doing" category when you don't know the full reasoning behind the technique

[qoute] LOL who doesnt know the full reasoning? You must be a sound guy...

Dennis I agree with ya
I am I work more in the recording realm but its the same concepts. You would be surprised at the amount of shit I've had people ask me about, when it comes to sound. Simple stuff the average musician should know flies right over their heads, stuff like should "I use phantom power on a sm57". Most people I've heard say you port the head so you can see the drummers foot more than 75% of the time.
 

wmpdrummer13

New member
yea well a sound guy in the recording realm and a sound guy working at a bar/club are usually on a totally differet level. Ideally i would have a studio guy follow my band around and take over the sound board at these bars. A lot of places have a problem with that tho..
 

Brother_Bong

New member
wmpdrummer13":mq07ga91 said:
A lot of places have a problem with that tho..
Yeah tell me about it! I use to be the all around tech/sound guy for a band, and the looks I got when I told house sound I wanted to run the board was not nice. If they didn't let me I would stand behind the guy and tell him what to change. Hey, it was my job to make the band sound like they were supposed to.
 

Brother_Bong

New member
Dude, that was the most fun! Got to shoulder up with some "names", and basically get into many years of shows for free.
Priceless!
 
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