bass drum rebound vs spring tension

wolfsburg6674

New member
about a week a go i tuned my bass drum down on the resonant side and up on the batter side and got a sound i really liked...and i have a dw 7000 pedal with my spring tension very tight which i also like...but now my pedal is rebounding too the point where its not possible to do fast triplets...is there a way i can turn my tension down and combat this? or do i have sacrifice my sound?
 

disrupt13

New member
loosen your tension springs, i notice when i loosen mine it isnt as responsive. which im assuming is what your lloking for.
 

BillRayDrums

New member
I keep my spring as tight as it will go and the beater thrown as far back as possible (DW5000 Delta 2)

My reason is this- You have a 0-90 degree range of motion with your hands, why do you limit your pedal ROM to just 45 degrees?

I like to let my foot rest on the pedal, and that alone cocks the beater angle down to 45 degrees. And, I have the benefit of a little tension built up. I've learned to control that tension and use it to my advantage. It's just stored kinetic energy.
 

Shalaq

New member
I would loosen the spring tension. The springs are on a pedal to adjust anytime you adjust the kick tuning, so that everytime it feels the same.
 

Alexander

New member
BillRayDrums":2nfdlpnx said:
I keep my spring as tight as it will go and the beater thrown as far back as possible (DW5000 Delta 2)

My reason is this- You have a 0-90 degree range of motion with your hands, why do you limit your pedal ROM to just 45 degrees?

I like to let my foot rest on the pedal, and that alone cocks the beater angle down to 45 degrees. And, I have the benefit of a little tension built up. I've learned to control that tension and use it to my advantage. It's just stored kinetic energy.
BillyRay, can you play fast 16th note triplets 4 a long period of time like that? I've never changed the universal factory standard setting of a 45 degree angled beater. Hmmm. :idea:
 

BillRayDrums

New member
Alexander":pt7otoov said:
BillRayDrums":pt7otoov said:
I keep my spring as tight as it will go and the beater thrown as far back as possible (DW5000 Delta 2)

My reason is this- You have a 0-90 degree range of motion with your hands, why do you limit your pedal ROM to just 45 degrees?

I like to let my foot rest on the pedal, and that alone cocks the beater angle down to 45 degrees. And, I have the benefit of a little tension built up. I've learned to control that tension and use it to my advantage. It's just stored kinetic energy.
BillyRay, can you play fast 16th note triplets 4 a long period of time like that? I've never changed the universal factory standard setting of a 45 degree angled beater. Hmmm. :idea:
Last time I checked, I can do 16th note bursts of 4 notes at 160BPM.

RLRL FFFF RLRL FFFF

Besides, is that going to serve the music I am playing? Check my websites http://www.billraydrums.com or http://www.myspace.com/billraydrums for examples of my playing, should I need to prove my worthiness.

Playing 16th note triplets doesn't get me hired. Playing phat grooves does.

Hey Alex- I will be playing LaBarca on Lombard St. Nov. 10th in SF- come on down and hang with us.
 

Johnny Cat

New member
I can't see loosening your spring on your pedal sacrificing the sound of your drum really. As long as you allow the rebound to send the beater back off the head again by easing up on your foot after making contact. Playing into the head and not letting it release will definitely affect the tone of your drum by choking off the sound. Steve Smith demonstrates this very well on his DVD Drumset Technique/History of the US Beat (superb DVD), and after messing around with it myself following his example I've definitely found it to be true.
 

Chad Scott

New member
My method of spring tention is to match the tention to as fast as my foot will go! What I mean---When your going fast and the peddle is keeping up--not floppy or jumping off your foot.....locked to your foot...I tune mine as loose as I can without that happening. I like mine fast but not straining to the muscle...I also like a little bit more than a 45% angle--not much...I get more power in the hit with a little more angle--maybe 55%.....Hope This Helped!!
 

dahlgrendrummer

New member
I use an Axis pedal, and I keep my tension about medium. Usually when it's gets cooler out, I will loosen the tension slightly because when it gets cold the spring tightens up a bit. The advice for setting it to rebound pefectly with the speed of your foot is pretty sound advice.
 

wolfsburg6674

New member
i think some people are confused....i tuned my drum and really like the sound but im getting too much rebound...i was wondering if loosening the spring tension would offset the rebound rather than loosen my head and lose the tone i acquired
 

Alexander

New member
BillRayDrums":gr035mok said:
Alexander":gr035mok said:
BillRayDrums":gr035mok said:
I keep my spring as tight as it will go and the beater thrown as far back as possible (DW5000 Delta 2)

My reason is this- You have a 0-90 degree range of motion with your hands, why do you limit your pedal ROM to just 45 degrees?

I like to let my foot rest on the pedal, and that alone cocks the beater angle down to 45 degrees. And, I have the benefit of a little tension built up. I've learned to control that tension and use it to my advantage. It's just stored kinetic energy.
BillyRay, can you play fast 16th note triplets 4 a long period of time like that? I've never changed the universal factory standard setting of a 45 degree angled beater. Hmmm. :idea:
Last time I checked, I can do 16th note bursts of 4 notes at 160BPM.

RLRL FFFF RLRL FFFF

Besides, is that going to serve the music I am playing? Check my websites http://www.billraydrums.com or http://www.myspace.com/billraydrums for examples of my playing, should I need to prove my worthiness.

Playing 16th note triplets doesn't get me hired. Playing phat grooves does.

Hey Alex- I will be playing LaBarca on Lombard St. Nov. 10th in SF- come on down and hang with us.
LaBarca, eh? I drive by it all the time but never popped in even tho' I've been in S.F. all my 36 years. I'll try & check y'all out with my bro. or friends. What kind of muzak will ya play?

& have you ever heard of Pete Magadini? Look him up @ www.drummerworld.com. I'm taking lessons from him now & learning much crazy shit including G. Stone's Stick Control, Pete Magadini's own boox, & 3 more! :D
 

Johnny Cat

New member
wolfsburg6674":d5fpw06c said:
i think some people are confused....i tuned my drum and really like the sound but im getting too much rebound...i was wondering if loosening the spring tension would offset the rebound rather than loosen my head and lose the tone i acquired
I think I can see what you're saying now. The only thing that I know of with regards to that would be to try a smaller diameter kick drum. Sorry, I know that's easier said than done. Using that will give you the higher pitch that you like now with your current kick because of the smaller diameter, without as much rebound coming off the head. Basically you won't have to tune it as tight to get that pitch, therefore you won't have too much rebound. It's almost like if you took your floor tom and used it for a kick, only not quite that big a shift in size.

Also try tuning your batter head back down but tune the front head up higher. That can raise the pitch a fair bit. Loosening your beater may help to a degree, but the rebound you have is really because of the tension of the head.
 

drumgroovy

New member
wolfsburg6674":30kfjo54 said:
i think some people are confused....i tuned my drum and really like the sound but im getting too much rebound...i was wondering if loosening the spring tension would offset the rebound rather than loosen my head and lose the tone i acquired
Well, I've played on many kits which aren't mine and I must say I prefer a looser feel.

I think you've tuned your bass drum to sound what you want it too, but the feel is that it's just too damn tight and it tends to kick back, especially if you play on double pedals.

I prefer it a little looser because I play alotta fast double pedalling (metal, what do you expect?) and I don't like the response especially when I'm doing flams on the pedals or triplets. Kinda muffles the second kick.

My answer is simple, although alotta drummers won't agree...

Get triggers.

Either that or you gotta sacrifice your sound or your pedalling comfort.
 

Jaki

New member
Do you mean triplets as in 1 2 3 1 2 3 so u get 12 hits on the kick drum/s for every 4 beats ? or that pattern reffered to incorrectly by most drummers.


triplets looks like this 3/4 pattern
1 2 3 4
|@@@|@@@|@@@|@@@


the rong phrase is said this 4/4 pattern
1 2 3 4
|@-@@|@-@@|@-@@|@-@@

lololol
 

quikstang2

New member
Do some integrals, differential equations and other ridiculous math/physics problems involving the resonance of the head at different tensions and the changing tension on the spring. You might want to call the factory to get the spring rate to make your life easier.

Or just play with the tension of the spring and heads a little. You might not get that exact sound but you can get something close. Keep in mind that when you're playing in a band the sound of the drum that actually cuts through the mix and is heard will be different than when you play it by itself, so getting the sound close to perfect is more than good enough.


Sorry, I just felt like being a smartass today.
 

Yoda

New member
One way to combat the excess rebound from a tightly tuned Bass Drum is to combat the responce not from the spring side, or the skin side but from the only thing left.....the beater. If i tighten my skin to give a particular tone that i like but it gives me too much rebound then i swap my beater for a felt beater or even a fluffy type beater, this effectively 'soaks up' the excess vibrations from the head to give a nice single note and a good feel back through the pedal.

Try it and see, you may find you like it! lol

All the best

Yoda

http://www.cybadrummers.com
 

drumur

New member
I've been reading some of the posts and I'm a little surprised to find out how many drummers said they keep the spring really tight.
This is unnecessary wasted effort in my opinion. Why fight the resistance of spring tension and let the pedal play you. I want to be in control of my strokes...a tight spring does it's own thing.
rebound is a result of striking the head not spring tension.
Also, how can you get power and speed when you're fighting a tight spring?
I guarantee by increasing the beater angle, which causes a longer stroke, you'll get much more power and volume.
Watch a Simon Philips or Tommy Aldridge video. Their foot work appears effortless.
I tend to keep the spring moderately loose and the beater is about5 to 6 inches from the head.
I have sat in on a kit that had a tight pedal and I hated it...It totally cramped my style.
:?:
 
Top