Axis question!?

m

New member
the only difference in those models is the VDL:

Variable Drive Lever — featured on all AXIS A series.
The patented variable drive lever allows the player to obtain the feel of any type of pedal with one simple adjustment. The new "Beater Forward" design substantially increases the power of the AXIS A without making it feel heavier, resulting in an increase of both speed and punch from both heel-up and heel-down players. The Variable Drive Lever changes the ratio of the footboard movement to the arc of the beater.

worth it? Depends on if you want to change the ratio of the footboard movement to the arc of the beater.
I like the VDL, but once I set it, I don't change it.

the Musician's Friend pictures are wrong, by the way. They show the A model for both pedals. The X uses this fixed assembly:
 

xdoseonex

New member
its worth it if you see your self ajusting it. but most ppl fint the most comfortable spot is right where the axis X is fixed.
 

m

New member
it's hard to tell what comes with what, anymore. Just about any online store has their pics of the Axis goofed up.
I think only the A's come with Sonic Hammers, but you can always add them on later (which you can't do with a VDL)

I like the Sonic Hammers a lot- they're what I use.
 

dbkman

New member
I don't think I'de buy axis period. ( everybody keep your pitch forks sheathed..just not a fan )
 

xdoseonex

New member
dbkman":9s7pva6m said:
I don't think I'de buy axis period. ( everybody keep your pitch forks sheathed..just not a fan )
they can be hard to get used to. but i can help but think that if most of the people wh didnt like them played on them for a few days straight they would start to love them beyond any pedal theyve played
 

Brother_Bong

New member
m":2dj4wz12 said:
the only difference in those models is the VDL:

Variable Drive Lever — featured on all AXIS A series.
The patented variable drive lever allows the player to obtain the feel of any type of pedal with one simple adjustment. The new "Beater Forward" design substantially increases the power of the AXIS A without making it feel heavier, resulting in an increase of both speed and punch from both heel-up and heel-down players. The Variable Drive Lever changes the ratio of the footboard movement to the arc of the beater.

worth it? Depends on if you want to change the ratio of the footboard movement to the arc of the beater.
I like the VDL, but once I set it, I don't change it.

the Musician's Friend pictures are wrong, by the way. They show the A model for both pedals. The X uses this fixed assembly:
I was wondering about the pics, they both showed A's.
Simply put, either pedal is good, but I believe it's worth the extra to get vdl.
Listen to dose about where to buy them.
 

Greg90

New member
I wanted to mess with it some before posting...

First off it's built very well & looks awesome! It's fast but no matter what I do it's waaay too quiet & has very little power.

So I guess they would be great trigged.
 

m

New member
Greg90":376t3gc1 said:
I wanted to mess with it some before posting...

First off it's built very well & looks awesome! It's fast but no matter what I do it's waaay too quiet & has very little power.

So I guess they would be great trigged.
see if this article helps any (I found it on another forum but can't remember where or who wrote it)
It addresses setup issues and how to dial in your Axis if you feel you're lacking power:


Axis pedals only lack power in two circumstances

1 - when the player tries to play them like the chain-drive pedals they're more used to.

2 - When they're set up for very high speed.

1) is because direct drive uses different physics than non-direct (chain), and ATM is right when he says they don't have as much torque - but torque is not the only mechanical principle which can induce power in a bass drum pedal. Direct-Drive pedals, do not rely on torque - they rely on leverage and momentum.

If you want to get power from any pedal (not just Axis) you need to play it right - with Axis, you need to play it more like a drumstick and less like a bass drum pedal (in that you have to put the effort in at the start of the stroke and let the pedal do the work, just as you put the power into a drumstick hit at the start of the stroke and then let the stick carry it through). This is the opposite to non-direct pedals, whereyou HAVE to play the beater right into the head to get power, because they are less efficient systems.

If you try and play an Axis like a chain-drive pedal, where you HAVE to play the beater right into the head, you will not get power because you're putting too much in too late, ad the pedal does not have time to develop momentum (NOT torque). The reverse is also true - if you try and play a chain-drive pedal like you should play an Axis, you'll get no power either - if you do this, there isn't enough power at the end of the stroke to make anything happen to the bass drum head.

ANYONE who says that Axis pedals lack power has simply not spent enough time trying to play them like they should be played for power. The drumstick analogy above is the best example I can give - using Axis pedals is like using Moeller stroke, but it takes some time to get used to. Ultimately, like the stick, the drumhead and gravity do most of the work for you with Moeller technique, the beater, spring and drumhead can do most of the work for you with an Axis pedal (or any direct-drive pedal for that matter) - but if you've owned an Axis pedal for six months, and you've spent those six months trying to play it like you played the chain-drive you owned before, then you'll get nothing out of it...

2) Not just Axis, but ANY pedal - ANY pedal on the market - can be set up in a multitude of different ways. Try an experiment...

Take an Axis pedal, set it up with a light beater, high spring tension, and the beater head about 3 inches from the drumhead. Play it. What do you get? No power - correct!

Take an Iron Cobra, set it up with a light beater, high spring tension, and the beater head about 3 inches from the drumhead. Play it. What do you get? Wow - no power... Imagine that.

Now, take that Iron Cobra, change the beater for a heavier model, back off the spring tension and move the beater head back another 3 inches, so that it's around 6 inches from the head. Play it. What do you get. OH YEAH, THERE'S THAT POWER THAT IT WAS MISSING BEFORE! But it's not quite as fast, right?

Guess what happens if you do the same thing with an Axis? That's right - exactly the same - a massive increase in potential power, at the slight expense of some speed.

So, if the Axis pedals which some folks seem to think have no power have been setup for speed, then they're totally right - they have no power, but only, like any pedal, when they've been maximised for speed which robs any drum pedal system of potential power. It's just that it's quite rare to see an Eliminator, or DW, or Iron Cobra actually set up for maximum speed rather than maximum power (or more normally, a sensible balance of the two), because they aren't favoured for that style of setup.

I maintain that I can play harder and louder on a bass drum with an Axis than any drummer I know can with their regular pedal. Do I have a 'special' Axis pedal that allows me to do this? No - I have a normal A series regular footboard with either a Sonic Hammer beater or a BigFoot Ball beater. It didn't happen overnight, but I just know how to set it up for the results I want, and how to actually play it for the volume I need...

You'll have to take my word for it (unless some of you want to come and see me play, in which case you are welcome to), but if all Axis pedals truly have no power, how come mine do?
 
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