Axis longboard double pedal.

PDP9000

New member
Hey, i was just thinking about buying this and i wanted to know what some of you that
have used this pedal had to say about it. Is it really worth the money? Also what is the
diffrence between the Axis X-L2 Longboard Double Pedal and the Axis AL-2 Longboard Double Pedal ?
 

m

New member
the difference between the A and X models are explained in detail in this thread:

http://www.drumsmylife.com/viewtopic.ph ... rence+axis


as far as the Longboard difference, I believe it's been discussed at length before, but I can't seem to find the threads.
it's really going to come down to personal preference on the LBs vs the shortboards. I like the shorts just fine, the longboards tend to appeal more to metal/speed drummers. If you do a lot of heel-to-toe tapdancing it might be worth looking into the LB over the standard size.

If you want a top-of-the-line/state-of-the-art pedal and you have the $, Axis is definitely worth it.
 
Axis Pedals are ok (a little expensive)

The problem I found with them is that you dont get that bounce back that you do with other pedals.

So everything you do on the pedal you kind of work for but I guess it cant hurt in the long run. Escpecially if you switch to a different double pedal, your speed would probably be really good.
 

Brother_Bong

New member
I love Cheese and drums":2p992eeh said:
Axis Pedals are ok (a little expensive)

The problem I found with them is that you dont get that bounce back that you do with other pedals.

So everything you do on the pedal you kind of work for but I guess it cant hurt in the long run. Escpecially if you switch to a different double pedal, your speed would probably be really good.
For many years I could not find the right "bounce-back spot" on my dw5000. Bought Axis...........ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh. Worked for me, maybe not others. A lot of it had to do I think with me practicing so much"air-drumming" where I had no resistance, and focused on natural muscle movement. As far as the longboards, I've been trying to find a pair to try out for over a year. But Maine sucks, and I need to travel to see them. But at a size 12wide,I think they would suit me better.
 

Howepirate

New member
I love Cheese and drums":3nmfpal1 said:
Axis Pedals are ok (a little expensive)

The problem I found with them is that you dont get that bounce back that you do with other pedals.

So everything you do on the pedal you kind of work for but I guess it cant hurt in the long run. Escpecially if you switch to a different double pedal, your speed would probably be really good.
This would be solved with high spring tension.
 

GrindheadJim

New member
Axis A's are direct drive, whereas Axis X's rely on an offest hinge, so they are a littler more stiff. Recomment you just take the plunge with the A's.

Axis are adjustable to get almost any bounce back you wish - it just takes patience.
 

m

New member
GrindheadJim":1xvuqe4d said:
Axis A's are direct drive, whereas Axis X's rely on an offest hinge, so they are a littler more stiff. Recomment you just take the plunge with the A's.
I'm not sure I follow you there- all Axis pedals use a direct drive linkage. I'm pretty sure the only difference between X and A is the VDL assembly (pics in thread linked above) & possibly the footboard width.

I'd agree with the rebound factor for sure; you can get as much rebound as you need with them, I find. I believe there are different springs available though, for those who feel they need more tension there.
 

xdoseonex

New member
Howepirate":1sghrzsh said:
I love Cheese and drums":1sghrzsh said:
Axis Pedals are ok (a little expensive)

The problem I found with them is that you dont get that bounce back that you do with other pedals.

So everything you do on the pedal you kind of work for but I guess it cant hurt in the long run. Escpecially if you switch to a different double pedal, your speed would probably be really good.
This would be solved with high spring tension.
ok howe, this is gonna sound really weird, but i want you to do me a favor. click the link in my signture, and listen to poseidons horror. then sit down at your kit and play singles a the same speed i play them in that song. and tell me if your pedals give you a problem. When i had my springs tight, i found that when i played at that exact speed my pedals were at the floor when i went for the next stroke. I loosened my springs to give myself more power and to be able to play that song. I was wondering if it was the combination of tight springs and the direct drive or if it was just me.
 

PDP9000

New member
GrindheadJim":3t1bw6hy said:
Axis A's are direct drive, whereas Axis X's rely on an offest hinge, so they are a littler more stiff. Recomment you just take the plunge with the A's.

Axis are adjustable to get almost any bounce back you wish - it just takes patience.

Ok cool i play really fast metal so would the A's be good for that?
 

xdoseonex

New member
PDP9000":1yh0iydy said:
GrindheadJim":1yh0iydy said:
Axis A's are direct drive, whereas Axis X's rely on an offest hinge, so they are a littler more stiff. Recomment you just take the plunge with the A's.

Axis are adjustable to get almost any bounce back you wish - it just takes patience.

Ok cool i play really fast metal so would the A's be good for that?
any axis pedal will be great for metal
 

GrindheadJim

New member
m":5zn6vxhp said:
GrindheadJim":5zn6vxhp said:
Axis A's are direct drive, whereas Axis X's rely on an offest hinge, so they are a littler more stiff. Recomment you just take the plunge with the A's.
I'm not sure I follow you there- all Axis pedals use a direct drive linkage. I'm pretty sure the only difference between X and A is the VDL assembly (pics in thread linked above) & possibly the footboard width.

I'd agree with the rebound factor for sure; you can get as much rebound as you need with them, I find. I believe there are different springs available though, for those who feel they need more tension there.
The major difference is being able to adjust the variable drive lever on the A's direct drive, whereas the X is a fixed linkage. Sorry for the confusion.

Yes, Axis is perfect for metal.
 

writheindecay

New member
cant go wrong with the axis or the tricks. my biggest complaint with the axis pedals are theyre all speed and no power.
 

m

New member
Axis pedals only lack power in two circumstances

1 - when the player tries to play them like the chain-drive pedals they're more used to.

2 - When they're set up for very high speed.

1) is because direct drive uses different physics than non-direct (chain), and it is right to say they don't have as much torque - but torque is not the only mechanical principle which can induce power in a bass drum pedal. Direct-Drive pedals, do not rely on torque - they rely on leverage and momentum.

If you want to get power from any pedal (not just Axis) you need to play it right - with Axis, you need to play it more like a drumstick and less like a bass drum pedal (in that you have to put the effort in at the start of the stroke and let the pedal do the work, just as you put the power into a drumstick hit at the start of the stroke and then let the stick carry it through). This is the opposite to non-direct pedals, whereyou HAVE to play the beater right into the head to get power, because they are less efficient systems.

If you try and play an Axis like a chain-drive pedal, where you HAVE to play the beater right into the head, you will not get power because you're putting too much in too late, ad the pedal does not have time to develop momentum (NOT torque). The reverse is also true - if you try and play a chain-drive pedal like you should play an Axis, you'll get no power either - if you do this, there isn't enough power at the end of the stroke to make anything happen to the bass drum head.

ANYONE who says that Axis pedals lack power has simply not spent enough time trying to play them like they should be played for power. The drumstick analogy above is the best example I can give - using Axis pedals is like using Moeller stroke, but it takes some time to get used to. Ultimately, like the stick, the drumhead and gravity do most of the work for you with Moeller technique, the beater, spring and drumhead can do most of the work for you with an Axis pedal (or any direct-drive pedal for that matter) - but if you've owned an Axis pedal for six months, and you've spent those six months trying to play it like you played the chain-drive you owned before, then you'll get nothing out of it...

2) Not just Axis, but ANY pedal - ANY pedal on the market - can be set up in a multitude of different ways. Try an experiment...

Take an Axis pedal, set it up with a light beater, high spring tension, and the beater head about 3 inches from the drumhead. Play it. What do you get? No power - correct!

Take an Iron Cobra, set it up with a light beater, high spring tension, and the beater head about 3 inches from the drumhead. Play it. What do you get? Wow - no power... Imagine that.

Now, take that Iron Cobra, change the beater for a heavier model, back off the spring tension and move the beater head back another 3 inches, so that it's around 6 inches from the head. Play it. What do you get. OH YEAH, THERE'S THAT POWER THAT IT WAS MISSING BEFORE! But it's not quite as fast, right?

Guess what happens if you do the same thing with an Axis? That's right - exactly the same - a massive increase in potential power, at the slight expense of some speed.

So, if the Axis pedals which some folks seem to think have no power have been setup for speed, then they're totally right - they have no power, but only, like any pedal, when they've been maximised for speed which robs any drum pedal system of potential power. It's just that it's quite rare to see an Eliminator, or DW, or Iron Cobra actually set up for maximum speed rather than maximum power (or more normally, a sensible balance of the two), because they aren't favoured for that style of setup.

I maintain that I can play harder and louder on a bass drum with an Axis than any drummer I know can with their regular pedal. Do I have a 'special' Axis pedal that allows me to do this? No - I have a normal A series regular footboard with either a Sonic Hammer beater or a BigFoot Ball beater. It didn't happen overnight, but I just know how to set it up for the results I want, and how to actually play it for the volume I need...

You'll have to take my word for it (unless some of you want to come and see me play, in which case you are welcome to), but if all Axis pedals truly have no power, how come mine do?
I forget who wrote this particular quote (wasn't me), but I tend to agree with their findings, and am reminded of it anytime the "lacking power" statement comes up in an Axis thread.
 

Howepirate

New member
xdoseonex":fqm708dj said:
Howepirate":fqm708dj said:
I love Cheese and drums":fqm708dj said:
Axis Pedals are ok (a little expensive)

The problem I found with them is that you dont get that bounce back that you do with other pedals.

So everything you do on the pedal you kind of work for but I guess it cant hurt in the long run. Escpecially if you switch to a different double pedal, your speed would probably be really good.
This would be solved with high spring tension.
ok howe, this is gonna sound really weird, but i want you to do me a favor. click the link in my signture, and listen to poseidons horror. then sit down at your kit and play singles a the same speed i play them in that song. and tell me if your pedals give you a problem. When i had my springs tight, i found that when i played at that exact speed my pedals were at the floor when i went for the next stroke. I loosened my springs to give myself more power and to be able to play that song. I was wondering if it was the combination of tight springs and the direct drive or if it was just me.
Hmm, I didn't really have a problem. My springs are almossst maxed out. Just a little under.
 

m

New member
I meant to mention my personal experience too, but forgot to when posting that quote.

When I told my band and engineer I wanted to record with my Axis pedals instead of the studio's DWs, they weren't thrilled. They were convinced the Axis pedals couldn't produce enough punch or power for recording.
We spent a couple hours comparing them 'shootout style.' Even switched out my Sonic Hammers for the DW beaters, but in the end it turned out the Axis w/ SH beaters were producing just as much volume and punch as the DWs (which feel too bulky to me.)

Direct drive pedals definitely feel a little different than other configs, but I don't find that they lack power when setup correctly.

Or maybe I'm misunderstanding what folks mean when they say they 'lack power.' Do you mean that they don't produce as much volume from the drum as other pedals, or just that they feel like a lighter stroke?
 
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