Any suggestions on tuning coated heads?

nate

New member
I use Remo coated ambassadors on the batter and resonant sides and I can't seem to get ride of the over ring. I bought these heads hoping for a good 'thud' sound from my toms and because I noticed that a lot of the bands I listen to and like the sound of their toms use them too. I have tried everything and I still can't get the right kind of sound I've been looking for. If anyone has any suggestions on how I should tune them so that I get a good 'thud' sound with out over ring or even some different heads I should try so that I get that sound, please let me know. I play mostly noise rock type music and I don't really want to tune them too high. Thanks for any suggestions.
 
The reason that you cant get your toms to sound like your favorite bands' is because:
A) They're using mics
B) They're using triggers

For me, the only way to get rid of ring is to get some sort of muffling device, eg. e-rings, moongels, rem-o's, etc...
 

Rob Crisp

New member
If you want a decent "thwack" and then little sustain, try JAW tuning, just above wrinkle.

Also try using thin heads on the bottom. It's a common misconception that a thicker bottom head resonates less than a thin one.

A thin head will excite and start making noise quicker than a thick one, correct, but because a thick head has more mass, it continues to vibrate and resonate for a longer period than a thin head.

If you are playing with power, those thick bottom heads are definitely going to get excited and resonate.

And like the previous post said you can always use moongels or some kind of dampening if needs be. Personally I prefer to get as nice a tone as possible and avoid dampening.

Have fun tuning!
 

Rob Crisp

New member
Fair enough, processing and mics can dramatically effect the sound of a drum but imagine building a house on a sand. The house could be the best brickwork in the world but if the foundation is bad the house will be equally as sketchy.

Don't expect to get the sound you want just because you have access to the best mics, you need a decent sounding drum first!
 

markmywords

New member
they're right, use lower mass heads on the bottom. ambassadors should be fine but you can move to diplomats. I use evans resonators on the bottom of my toms with single-ply coated g1s on top. If you want a good thud sound use pinstripes, just about all they are is thud. And noise rock bands you generally want to tune pretty tight to get really good response and stuff, unless you don't play like fast noise rock like fall of troy or what not. another way to do it with the heads you already have. find a pitch where there is no dissonance(messy sloppy overtones) and tune both heads to that pitch, even if it's pretty high. Then bring the bottom head up in pitch about one to two notes. This will bring out a ton of attack and shorten your decay a bit and project the sound upwards into the mics. That will help you boom it up a bit. also remember even tensioning will help eliminate ring. Or tune all the tuning points to eliminate the ring like you would with a guitar, just tune up or down (but make sure to tune down then up a little, don't just tune down) until the dissonance changes or becomes less than gradually work your way through until it becomes a solid note. Tuning is tough as hell sometimes, especially when you are starting out and can't find that sound you're looking for. Ask the drummers you look up to to give you pointers or try playing they're kit backstage to see what it actually sounds like and how tight things are.

Hope this wasn't too much bullshit and you find it somewhat useful
 

SGarrett

New member
I use Aquarian Coated Response 2 batters and Hi-Frequency (Diplomat weight) resonants. I tune coated and clear heads the same.
 

nate

New member
ok thanks guys. I've been messing with some stuff and i think i've got what i was looking for. thanks a bunch.
 
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