Ambidextrous drumming...

craigyp

New member
Heyo!

I have recently re-arranged my kit to mimic a left-handed players' i.e. my hi-hat is on my right and the ride on my left. I plan to develop a good lefty technique hoping that i will become an "ambidextrous drummer".

Obviously this would improve technique but would it be worthwhile?

It's just a kinda fun experiment... bit bored at the moment. :?

Any thoughts?

craig 8)
 

LeJayk

New member
Right on. I've been thinking about that, but just got put off when I realised I'd have to switch all my kit around, then fiddle with it for ages til it felt right, and then I was uninspired by the idea =[

Let us know how it goes. Lord knows we can never have too much independance in our limbs :)
 

UNIONVILLE

New member
i think it will eventually help with independence a lot and improving your technique. but, if youre right handed, why not just be a right handed drummer?
 

screamkevin

New member
It's a good thing, period. I am naturally ambidextrous, but I prefer my left hand. I play drums right-handed, however. When I was learning to play double bass, I turned my kit lefty and strengthened my left foot that way. Turning lefty (or opposite the way you normally play) forces you to lead with your weak side, and strengthens your overall playing. When you can adapt your weak side to strong-side playing, it opens up new levels of comfort and possibilities that you may not have thought of before.

I am a HUGE advocate of opposite-side playing. It helps unbelievably.
 

craigyp

New member
that's cool to hear guys!

I am finding it especially difficult when doing fills to make sure that i end up with a right hand hit so i can crash with my left :-|

UNIONVILLE":13czqh4r said:
but, if youre right handed, why not just be a right handed drummer?
i fancy doin somethin different! :D
 

RogersDrummer

New member
Hey,

Glad to hear you are doing that. Not enough drummers try to keep all of their limbs in check. This leads to being dependant on one side. I believe you shouldnt be dependant on anything more then the other when it comes to drumming, and even music in general. This way, you are free to do whatever you want without making compromises. Making compromises is a big no-no when it comes to drumming in my opnion.

A good way to get your left hand in check without moving your set around, is to simply add more toms/cymbals to your left. I always tell people to try adding an extra floor tom next to their hihat. By doing that, you can get more use out of your left hand. Open handed playing is also another good technique to try.

Rob
 

xUODx

New member
That's is a great thing to do but you dont have to rearrange your kit.....
you can just force your self to play open handed.....I play open on a right handed drumkit and the main things ive noticed is that it strengthens your left hand amazingly and it really opens your technique as far as fills because when you play cross stick technique you tie your snare hand up with your right..also try either putting another ride cymbal or putting your main one on your left side right above your hi-hat..its very awkward at first but it definetly pays off in the end.....my advice is to go to drummerworld.com and watch some videos of Carter Beauford.......He's the best at this!!
 

Hellschef

New member
Well I'm left handed but right footed so I play on a right handed set up but play open handed and have mr ride to the left too like so:


I started learning to play completley righty too about 5 months and I'm where I was after a year of learning left at the minute whilst playing righty so I'm learning twice as fast and its definatley expanded the possibilities of patterns I play.

Hope everyone is well,

Kev

Edit: when you gig don't leave your van unlocked or all your lovely Sabian AA's get stolen and you're left with having to start from sratch with B8's :evil: I'm mean c'mon! Max splashes with B8's?!?! rant over...
 

m

New member
yep, anything that forces you to work on a weaker aspect of your skillset has to be a good thing!

The way I've got my kit configured presently, I can switch to either hand/foot (middle pedal, central hi-hat, ride on either side), and have been concentrating on it more lately. Feels good to push yourself in a direction you haven't gone before. Not that I'd ever try to play 'left-handed,' but I think it's got to be good to promote strength in the weaker limbs that way.
 

screamkevin

New member
There's nothing wrong with open-handed playing, but remember, it's still not making you lead with your opposite hand. Turning completely opposite will force your entire body to flip, and you'll really notice a big difference, even in attempting to play a simple groove with no fills. It makes you work for it. Try it, even if only for one practice session, and you'll see what I mean.
 

sinborn

New member
Derek Roddy said in an interview that he never worked on speed. He worked on his weak side, and the speed came naturally.

I totally agree. My left side (I'm a lefty) has no problems with endurance, while I'm always working for more from my right.
 

hodgin_drummer

New member
i tried to set up my drums like that but i just cat get the hang of it. I'm ambidextrous when i do some things like golf and baseball but other things just don't work out. :?
 

rockdrummer2063

New member
i have always said it is good to work on your weak side. and for me the left side is my weak side. i didnt go as far as rearranging my drum set by putting the hi-hats on the right. i just played the hi-hats and ride on the left side and played with that hand. cause then you end up leading fill with the right just ever so slightly and it gives them a new feel. also try leading your fills with your left hand, the will improve your timing and speed.
 

Guy&i

New member
im a righty, and i rearranged my set as a lefty set and played about 4 months like that - with the left hand as my guide hand.
this absolutly rules and is a great way to develop a strong "righty" feel on the left leg and hand...
on the first 2 weeks i felt like i was goin 6 years back in time playingwise, but after a while u just get used to it and make the progress u need in no time...
overall, when i rearranged the set as a righty again, i got some creative fills out of my head to the drums and the feel of my left leg on the dubblebass is sounding brighter...
now i put "lefty" leg exercises on right hand playing and "righty" leg exercises on left hand playing much more easily.

id call the whole thing (rearranging the set as a lefty if ur a righty) a BRAIN OPENER.
fun fun fun
 

stidger

New member
my old drum teacher used to make me practise all my grooves both as a standard righty and an open handed righty

it definately made my left hand stronger and me more confident

it cant hurt to practise this way although i admit i have never set my kit up and played it like a left handed player

one thing i do do from time to time, is play the kick patterns with my left foot and not the right ( i use a double pedal and a drop clutch on the hats)

:twisted: :twisted: :twisted:
 

break the prism

New member
i switch my set to either my hats in the middle and a ride on either side, or just a normal setup with an extra hi-hat

i started playing lefty, but soon switched to right. i still switch it up though. it's a good skill, especially for linear beats and odd meter fills.
 

sp4zium

New member
for an easier version of ambidextrious practice i just work on my open form... (left hand playing high-hat and right hand free to move around drums...) kinda wierd in the beginning, but opens up some really interesting possibilities.
 

Hellschef

New member
screamkevin":1sxplvk9 said:
There's nothing wrong with open-handed playing, but remember, it's still not making you lead with your opposite hand. Turning completely opposite will force your entire body to flip, and you'll really notice a big difference, even in attempting to play a simple groove with no fills. It makes you work for it. Try it, even if only for one practice session, and you'll see what I mean.
Ahh if that was in reponse to me then thats how I've drummed since day one, I haven't just swtiched to playing like that its how I've always played, kinda wierd I know. Its does give me many advantages as I have a lot more options when it comes to using the toms whilst still keeping a pulse with my left hand on the hi-hat, ride, crash etc. Playing how I do also forces me to lead with my right hand when doing fills across the toms so I've got a good right hand aswell as left.

Hope everyone's well,

Kev
 

screamkevin

New member
Hey Kev,

My post was just meant as a general response to open-handed drumming, no offense intended. All I was trying to say was that even if you play open-handed, when you go to do a fill, you're still leading with your right hand. You're really not getting the benefit of true ambidexterity. (ambidextrousesness? ambidextrosity? You know what I mean, ROTFL...)

To truly be ambidextrous, you should be able to lead with either hand or foot comfortably.
 

Hellschef

New member
screamkevin":1fht9no8 said:
Hey Kev,

My post was just meant as a general response to open-handed drumming, no offense intended. All I was trying to say was that even if you play open-handed, when you go to do a fill, you're still leading with your right hand. You're really not getting the benefit of true ambidexterity. (ambidextrousesness? ambidextrosity? You know what I mean, ROTFL...)

To truly be ambidextrous, you should be able to lead with either hand or foot comfortably.
Ahh no worries my friend I wasn't taking it personally I thought I'd made an error in my initial post and had miscommunicated what I meant to everyone :lol:

You are correct about playing open handed its not true Ambidex..blah...whatever haha :roll: we need somone to fill us in on the correct word for that. What I'm working on at the minute is doing grooves where I'm playing open hi-hat or crash and using my left kick pedal for my lead foot and also doing fills from the floor tom to hi tom. I reckon thats about as ambidexterous as its going to go for me just for now.

Hope you're well,

Kev
 
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