2 ply vs 1ply heads on a bass drum....

likelight2flies

New member
this morning, as i gave my room a much needed cleaning, i took a look at my superkick 2 and all the good memories we had together. you see, it was not too long ago that my good friend ended up cracking on the top ply. now when i realized i had cracked it, i remember i was not feeling as if my pedals were rebounding off the head like usual. now, i have one ply head on there that i had lying around. ever since then i haven't felt like my beaters are rebounding from the head enough. the pedals seem to lag now no matter what kind of spring tension is applied. i was wondering if the difference in plies makes a difference or is my tuning the case.
 

SGarrett

New member
It's the dead outter ply and the small air pocket between the plies. An actual single ply kick head will have similar rebound, a little more actually.
 

likelight2flies

New member
that was my reasoning behind making it tight....so now im at a loss. i need to take a physics course or something lol. what else could be causing the poor rebound?
 

SGarrett

New member
You're very welcome.

Here's a fun exercise for you.

Play straight 8ths on the hats and a 2 & 4 on the snare. Set your click to 70-75bpm.

Start with quarter notes on the kick, all four. Now move it over one 16th note, to the "e", and so forth until you get through all four 16ht notes. Play each measure four times before moving on.

Now we're going to play groupings of two. Start with "1-e", and work through all four groupings the same way you did above.

And now for the fun, groupings of three. Start with "1-&-a", then "1-e-a", then "e-&-a", and finally "1-e-&".

Speed isn't the issue here, consistency is, so don't be afraid to go even slower if you need to. Make sure you're able to get through the entire exercise without straining so can focus on clean and confident notes. Speed this up by 2bpm a day and you'll see results within a week. My pedal recommendations are this. Set your pedal up so the ball of your foot is in the sweet spot and the beater stays 4-5" off of the kick head with your foot/leg completely relaxed on the footboard. There should be enough spring tension that the pedal is responsive but no so much that you're having to push. From here, lift your heel up a few inches without letting the beater move forward and then let it drop. The beater should fly into the head and then back off. For playing the doubles, play the first note with the ball of your foot and the second with the heel drop. For the trips, the first two with the ball of your foot and then the last with the heel drop. You could even do the first with your toes, the second with the ball of your foot, and the third with the heel drop, but it's hard getting a lot of volume from your toes.
 

Rob Crisp

New member
SGarrett":23t42c05 said:
You're very welcome.

Here's a fun exercise for you.

Play straight 8ths on the hats and a 2 & 4 on the snare. Set your click to 70-75bpm.

Start with quarter notes on the kick, all four. Now move it over one 16th note, to the "e", and so forth until you get through all four 16ht notes. Play each measure four times before moving on.

Now we're going to play groupings of two. Start with "1-e", and work through all four groupings the same way you did above.

And now for the fun, groupings of three. Start with "1-&-a", then "1-e-a", then "e-&-a", and finally "1-e-&".

Speed isn't the issue here, consistency is, so don't be afraid to go even slower if you need to. Make sure you're able to get through the entire exercise without straining so can focus on clean and confident notes. Speed this up by 2bpm a day and you'll see results within a week. My pedal recommendations are this. Set your pedal up so the ball of your foot is in the sweet spot and the beater stays 4-5" off of the kick head with your foot/leg completely relaxed on the footboard. There should be enough spring tension that the pedal is responsive but no so much that you're having to push. From here, lift your heel up a few inches without letting the beater move forward and then let it drop. The beater should fly into the head and then back off. For playing the doubles, play the first note with the ball of your foot and the second with the heel drop. For the trips, the first two with the ball of your foot and then the last with the heel drop. You could even do the first with your toes, the second with the ball of your foot, and the third with the heel drop, but it's hard getting a lot of volume from your toes.
This is a great exercise! I learnt a load of theese when I started at DrumTech. Combinations of foot patterns and simple hand patterns to keep the groove tight. Good for technique and co-ordination.
 

drumur

New member
Play straight 8ths on the hats and a 2 & 4 on the snare. Set your click to 70-75bpm.

Start with quarter notes on the kick, all four. Now move it over one 16th note, to the "e", and so forth until you get through all four 16ht notes. Play each measure four times before moving on.

Now we're going to play groupings of two. Start with "1-e", and work through all four groupings the same way you did above.

And now for the fun, groupings of three. Start with "1-&-a", then "1-e-a", then "e-&-a", and finally "1-e-&".
This is great stuff...I've had my students do this same type of exercise.
Once you get that down, play it with the Hi Hat playing 1/8 notes but accent the 1/4 note pulse. "Down/up strokes"
 

EOTE_drummer

New member
yeah my bass player (who happens to be HUGE) busted my first ply on my superkick II as well. i was P-OED! so then i bought a Remo Powersonic III and it always sounded to dead, to muffled. i always got that horrible death metal bass drum click sound.

but all is well, for i have a new superkick now. reunited at last! :D
 
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