1 overhead, 1 kick, thats it!

dannycareyisgod

New member
Hey everyone. Recently I just recorded with my band, and my guitarist has a pretty decent kick drum mic, and then a pretty decent overhead mic. I was a little skeptical of the idea at first, but when I heard the finished product, I realized that we got a really good sound going. So I guess the point of this was to maybe ask what else I can do to get an even better, more balanced sound. I wish I could mic every drum, but unfortunately my band mates mixer doesn't have that many inputs :(.

Any suggestions would be great!


Thanks,

Corey
 

Alan_

New member
you at least want kick, snare and stereo overheads if you want to beef it up.

if you're going to be covering toms with your overhead mics, larger diaphragm condenser microphones would be great. small diaphragm mics won't pick up some of the lower tones of the toms as well.
 

dannycareyisgod

New member
Alan_":1paacsx8 said:
you at least want kick, snare and stereo overheads if you want to beef it up.

if you're going to be covering toms with your overhead mics, larger diaphragm condenser microphones would be great. small diaphragm mics won't pick up some of the lower tones of the toms as well.
thats what i want to do. i want my toms to sound real low and booming, i want my kick to be kinda loud, and i want my cymbals and snare to sound balanced.
 

Rem

New member
seriously, low priced large diaphragm condensors, go for behringer B-1s

they are very low priced and you can use them for lots of stuff
 

jmanhughes

New member
If you can mix them on a computer with a program like Audacity or something, you could copy the the overhead track and do a low pass on one and a hig pass on the other(ending with 3 total tracks). That might help bring about a bit more clarity. Then beef up the kick track maybe.
 

DrumsPlus

New member
This is the set-up Jason Bittner used at DRT 2008. One over head condenser mic and a kick mic. The set sounded great. I know both mics where Shures but I am not sure which ones. The point is, with good mics, I know it can be done and done really well with just 2 mics.
 

Alan_

New member
audio technica and samson make some EXCELLENT large diaphragm condensers for cheap.
 
the only reason to mic toms is to get more control over the mix

i mic like this

1 Snare
1 Kick
1 rack tom
2 floor toms
1 hi hat
2 overhead
1 over ride bell

can be a bit of a pain in the ass but considering how obsessed i am with the right mix its worth it
 

camerondh

New member
I've seen alot of odd mic set ups, but I think preference plays a part. I like that alot of you guys are mentioning condensing mics, that is definitely a good thought.
The last time I recorded I had a Shure sm57 on the bottom of the snare because I didn't want an overbearing snare sound. I had 4 overhead mics; two set about a two and half feet above my right and left crashes, the other two on the sides. It captured alot because I was in a small space, but I've heard that even 6 overheads works good. I mic the tops of my toms and the batter and resonant side of my bass drums. I also mic the top of my high hats. Shure sm57 mics are pretty good for that, but there are definitely some impeccable senheizer mics. good luck
 

BillRayDrums

New member
I record like that fairly often but the engineer also sets up room mics a little farther out to capture the stereo sound out front.

However, recording this way will require you to present a balanced sound from the source. I would suggest playing your kit a little quieter, then balancing the sounds within that manner.

You would be quite surprised at how much better the drums sound when you play them quieter than normal.
 

Alan_

New member
BillRayDrums":2vdriv9w said:
However, recording this way will require you to present a balanced sound from the source. I would suggest playing your kit a little quieter, then balancing the sounds within that manner.
THAT'S THE MONEY RIGHT THERE!
 

wmpdrummer13

New member
Sometimes it pays to be simple, the less mics you are using the less chance there is for phase cancellation. If you dont know much about the technical side of recording I would recommend only using a 1 kick, 1 snare, and 2 condenser mics overhead, preferably a large diaphram condenser but I have used 2 pencil condensers and they sounded great. Would also recommend a large diaphram condenser at the other end of the room and then adjust the level in the mix, gives it a great, open, natural reverb. But even with all the technology that is out there it all comes down to how the drums are tuned. I would definitely recommend getting the best possible wide open sound out of your drums before you ever start worrying about mics and placement. Also to answer the question about not having many inputs on a mixer - do live takes, your drums will definitely get picked up by the amp mics and vocal mics, which might not be good for the other band members sound but they can always go back and overdub.
 
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