How do you know if you're good?

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CooknessMunster
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Post Sat Nov 04, 2006 1:16 pm

You never are, cause there is always someone better..... I guess when you tell yourself that you 're good sometimes you loose the ambition to get better or try new things that you normally wouldn't do.
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Post Sat Nov 04, 2006 3:07 pm

its important to be able to play difficult things or tricky things but u also need to sound good and the audience has to be excited and entertained, which is why spinning drum sticks and good stage presence is good a long w/ playing complicated things. like keith moon was amazing but he just kinda did what he felt was right, neil peart is amazing but i get bored watching him sometimes. now portnoy has both impossible to play drum parts that sound cool and he has very good stage presence.
in terms of knowing if ur good or not its always nice to hear compliments from other drummers
the day a profesional drummer told me i could be playing professionalyh was the day i started to think i was getting somewhere. its funny too when i first started i always bragged about how good i am and now that ive actually improved and people ask me i tell them well im not professional so how good could i be? sorry for rambling lol
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Waylon
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Post Sat Nov 04, 2006 5:10 pm

Ramble on it's okay. I do it. Of course inside you must feel a certain amount of confidence all the time but this can fluctuate if you start thinking that you are hot shit because it is inevitably followed by the realization that you could be better and then this humbling experience makes you work even harder. Anyway that's what can happen until you just decide to remain in beginners mind. Beginners can see many possibilities, experts sometimes only see few. Pro is an attitude then of confidence and appropriate humility. It is nice to hear compliments and it's important to get feedback but ultimately we have to be our own judges and better to have an accurate assessment of your current abilities than one that's based on ego. Whaddya think?
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Rob Crisp
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Post Sat Nov 04, 2006 8:36 pm

Who defines good?

When I learnt my first beat, I thought that was good. Then I learnt something harder, that was good! I think it changes as your goals change.

I think it's safe to say if you can get a gig with a band then you're at a standard other people percieve as at least good!

Just make sure you keep raising the bar when you practice and you'll be fine.
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Johnny Cat
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Post Sat Nov 04, 2006 9:49 pm

fas-tedz wrote:Thanks for the input (really) I was responding more to an earlier post regarding solos, and I do believe I'm right on this. I've seen and done very technical solos and left the general public out....played right over their heads, so to speak. I agree that you have to play and practice at a higher level than that and be true to yourself, but when playing to the general public, the point is to play what they want/need to hear...get them excited, play what makes them want to know more about the art of drums and 'music' in general. I have no delusions that I'm great and I grow daily. My goal is for them to grow with me.(and of course to have fun).
Johnny Cat wrote:
fas-tedz wrote:you're good if the audience thinks you are. period.


I couldn't help but disagree with that. I've seen too many drummers, guitarists, bass players and entire bands sit back on their laurels and get really lazy or allow their egos to inflate because they thought they were so good. They were basing this on the fact that the audience loved them. That in itself is fine. But what if the audience doesn't have a clue what makes a good drummer in terms of skill, etc?

Are we going to stop learning and growing as a musician because the audience thinks we're the best on earth when we're probably not?

I think it's hard to know when you're "good". I'd rather gauge myself by knowing when I'm getting better, and that's when I am able to go back to something I was struggling with before and finally nail it. I think that's all that really matters. And of course, having fun!


Oh ok right on. I totally understand that viewpoint then. I do agree that getting an audience going can be a very exiciting and rewarding thing, and is important. I mean, what's the point in playing in front of someone if you're not going to try and involve them in the whole excitement?. I just wasn't sure what you meant by what you said, and I've seen people terribly misled by audience adulation. Too many egos that have turned me off from what they were doing on the kit.
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Demented Drummer
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Post Sun Nov 05, 2006 7:43 am

I`ve always called myself "A GUY WITH DRUMS".

I`ve been playing since 1986. I don`t consider myself a good drummer but I am aware that I am better than a lot of drummers I see/hear. I`ve been compared to Vinnie Paul, Neil Peart, Mike Portnoy, Dave Lombardo, etc. It`s flattering, no doubt about it! But not enough to make my head swell and get a ridiculous ego.

I`m constantly striving to improve myself. Occassionaly I`ll impress myself, but not very often. I get positive feedback everytime I play but... whatever. I guess I`m selfish cuz I play for the enjoyment. If the audience gets off on it, then that`s icing on the cake.

I`m my own worse critic and have set myself pretty high standards. I`m crushed if I fall short, but not to the point of throwing in the sticks. I use it to feed my desire to improve. I never wanna think of myself as good or professional. I`m afraid that I`ll get that 'professional" opinion. I hate people who are high on themselves and think everything they touch turns to gold. I don`t enjoy watching those people.

Now having said that, it certainly is a big stroke to the ego to have people come up and compliment you.
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Post Sun Nov 05, 2006 9:23 am

If people like what you are doing then keep it up. I have people all of the time say that I am an awsome drummer. I let them know that I appreciate the compliment but do not let it go to my head. I am VERY critical with myself when it comes to my percussion skills. I always try to learn something new and get it tight. Don't be an ego freak when someone tells you that you are good. Be your own critic and keep learning without a big head. Alot of us are GOOD but ...Noone is perfect!! Peace!
FunkyDrummer
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Post Sun Nov 05, 2006 11:56 am

I think that you're good when your playing makes people dancing etc
be funky!
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AndeAir
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Post Sun Nov 05, 2006 5:51 pm

Qbs wrote:my friend told me this: after about 5 years of playing you thing you're really good, after 10 years you start to discover more and more things that you have to learn, and after 15 years you just start from beginning :)


I find my self coming up on that 10yr mark. I can play along to almost any song on the radio, but then i look around a some of the true drumers. they are the guys that don't need the radio. they just play and make music. I've spent the last 10 yrs playing the drums, now i see that i need to learn to play the music. Just remember, he who konws everything still learns that he knows nothing....
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iplaysjcdrums
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Post Sun Nov 05, 2006 11:53 pm

i think to become a good drummer and you know your good is when you become really good with timing and learning different techiques. being solid and tight all the time is another great way. someone already said this but if you sit in a room and record yourself play thats when youll know. you can correct your mistakes and only get better.
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Post Mon Nov 06, 2006 11:23 am

top drummer wrote:Hello all,
This is my first post here so let me start by introducing myself. My name is Scott I live in the UK and I've playing drums for about 2 years now. This seems like a really nice place and I hope to learn from all of you. :)

My question is how exactly would you know when you are a good drummer. Im not saying the best or proffesional, but just someone who can be called a good drummer. Would you need to have your playing listened to by other drummer or would it just be by your own mind (which is doubtfull) or is there any other ways. The reason is i just want to know how im doing. I know im not anything special considering ive only been playing for about 2 years, but still i would like to know.


If you are looking to improve yourself, try taping yourself and listening back. Try to be honest, but not too harsh on yourself. Just realistically critical. Ask yourself if:
a. Do I speed up through fills?
b. Am I grooving?
c. Do I sound sloppy?
d. Are all my backbeats even?
e. Am I grooving? (Notice I ask this twice)

Then try to make adjustments as you can. Also join a band. One can usually find musicians of equal strength. As you get better you will play with better musicians. That's a kind of guide you could use.
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Qbs
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Post Mon Nov 06, 2006 1:11 pm

What Dale wrote is very true - it might help to record yourself :) tapes don't lie... your ears do! :)
Rhytm is a way to transmit a description of experience
in an emotional and not abstract way.
It is more than a metaphor:
It is a physical experience as real as any other.
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TrunJun
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Post Thu Nov 09, 2006 12:25 am

Actually I have an answer to this... When you're completely and effortlessly trying to play the hardest stuff you've ever tried to play. Another good answer is if you progress at a rapid pace (which not a lot of people do). So ask yourself these questions: "Am I comfortable while playing with my band?" and "Am I progressing at a pace with which I am happy to progress at?"

Toodles and hope many a metal event in your near future.

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bdadrummer
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Post Thu Nov 09, 2006 5:15 am

your good if you get people coming up to you after shows and asking for your autograph and also if you have little kids following you around after the show xD
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Johnny Cat
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Post Thu Nov 09, 2006 5:27 am

Qbs wrote:What Dale wrote is very true - it might help to record yourself :) tapes don't lie... your ears do! :)


Better to use something like a computer. :) Tapes and tape decks can lie if they're out of calibration or dirty. They can drag or speed up and you may think your tempo is wavering when it's really not you at all. This happened to a friend of mine when he was recording. He couldn't understand what was going on with his playing. Turned out it was the tape recorder.
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