Hole in the base drum

Post here anything about the world of drumming. Equipment, music, drum gear, artists, events, gigs, and anything else drum set related!

Moderator: Moderators

Will
drumming adept
drumming adept
Posts: 105
Joined: Fri Nov 03, 2006 3:50 pm
Location: UK

Post Fri Nov 03, 2006 4:33 pm

I tried to cut a hole once, I failed miserably.

Although I'm sure some sound techs dont mind big flappy uneven squares in bass drums :roll:


I just bought an Evans EQ3 reso, comes with a 5" off set hole with some sort of protector on it so it wont rip and you wont slice your hand off when positioning mics inside!
Bigd11
drumming adept
drumming adept
Posts: 70
Joined: Sun Aug 20, 2006 10:32 am

Post Sat Nov 04, 2006 11:52 am

today i went and bought one of those "holz" a nice chrome one, it took a bit of jimmying to get it to damn fit but i got it in the end and i have to admit not only does it improve the sound but it looks the dogs bollocks (to all americans.."The dogs bollocks" means good lol)
Heresy! \M/
TamaDrummer123
beginner
beginner
Posts: 18
Joined: Fri Nov 03, 2006 5:11 pm

Post Wed Nov 08, 2006 12:50 pm

I like two holes, one on the lower right hand side and one on the lower left. I have also tried a hole in the dead center, but I can't say I really like it very much, but it does work for some people.
tonytonytony
new
new
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Nov 11, 2006 6:35 pm

Post Fri Jan 05, 2007 4:40 pm

i dunno if this has already been brough up but you could always do the old coffee can trick ;)

just take an empty metal coffee can,
heat it up on a stove burner (i believe works best with electrical stoves) until its super hot...

grab it with pot warmer gloves

and punch a hole through the head.
User avatar
deep-illusions
beginner
beginner
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 6:49 pm
Location: California

Post Fri Jan 05, 2007 4:43 pm

This is mainly a point of personal preference, i personally prefer to have no hole... it seems, to me, that the sound is richer and more full than with a hole...Id say to keep it closed, but if you prefer to have the hole just put it in... as long as you're happy.
"Thine deep illusion shall never end..."
User avatar
dammow
drumming adept
drumming adept
Posts: 459
Joined: Sat Oct 14, 2006 3:11 am
Location: LINCOLNSHIRE, ENGLAND

Post Fri Jan 05, 2007 6:31 pm

ive always played with a hole in the bass drum and i recently bought a new kit that came with a closed resonant head and i hated it- it felt really bouncy and strange so the first thing i did was cut a rough hole in untill i got a 'holz' etc to make it neat and tidy job, the result was much better and the drum felt totally different. i also found the drum alot easier to mic up too! but im sure there are people who prefer the 'bounce' of a closed head, so i guess its down to personal taste.!
User avatar
Rob Crisp
groove master
groove master
Posts: 2185
Joined: Wed Sep 20, 2006 2:19 am

Post Fri Jan 05, 2007 7:30 pm

I think a hole is pretty much a must if you're gigging, so the sound guy can get a mic in and pick up a decent thump from the batter head, as well as a bit of tone.

When I record I have one inside for the "slap" and one outside for the tone. Sounds fat!

Holz rings are great BTW, stops clumsy soundmen destroying the reso with mic stands!
drkwb
new
new
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Nov 28, 2006 10:51 am

Post Fri Jan 05, 2007 11:25 pm

Any sound man that can't get a good sound without a hole is a moron.

Low end frequencies need room to expand. When they put the mic inside a hole in the front head they are capturing the sound of your batter head, 6 - 12 inches away. Which is where you would want the mic to capture the low end frequencies of the batter head. Unless you are looking for that old school mid range Lars Ulrich sound then place the mic 2 - 3 inches from the batter head pointed directly at the beater and forget about the tone of your drum.

To capture the low end frequencies of the from head without a hole try maybe placing the mic 6 to 12 inches in front the of resonant head.

Ever notice that bass amps sound better when you step away from them? Same principle. Lower frequencies are bigger, physically and move slower therefor they need more room to spread out.

So next time a sound guy insists on a hole just ask him nicely to try placing the mic 2 inches off center and 6 - 12 inches in front of the head. If he complains about feedback or isolation then be prepared to drape a moving blanket over the front to isolate the mic. (this also works great in the studio).

Porting a bass head does affect feel and tone so it is the drummers perrogative to port or not. Keep in mind when porting start out small and go up to find the sound and feel you like. Yes, the amount of air you are letting out does matter. If you make the hole too big, depending on the size of the drum, you might as well have no front head at all.

Resonant bass heads are no different than resonant tom heads. Thickness, material and coating all make a difference so don't let any sound guy tell you what to do if you are happy with the sound and feel of your drum.

Also keep in mind if you bury the beater on your batter head when you play and put a mic inside you will loose the bennifit of the front head resonating to compensate for the batter head being muted when you bury the beater.

I personally bury the beater weather I play heel up or down, but I tune my bass drum to allow the resonant head to resonate and bring back the fullness that I loose from burying the beater.

Imagine that, a resonant head adding resonance. Things that make you go hmmm....

Next time a sound guy suggests you cut a hole in your front head suggest he do the same to your bass players speaker cab to get a better sound from inside. But chances are if he's the type of idiot that thinks you have to port a bass drum then he probably insists on running the bass guitar direct as well.
drummer4hire
beginner
beginner
Posts: 12
Joined: Sun Dec 24, 2006 12:49 pm
Location: Tennessee

Post Sat Jan 06, 2007 10:23 am

Any sound man that can't get a good sound without a hole is a moron.

You can say that all you want, but if you want gigs then you'll listen to the people that try to make you sound better.

I'd recomend the hole, but because there are many different genres it's all about what you want to sound like.

Evans eq3 heads are really nice if you want an option.
Daily seeking glorious rock majesty
Daniel W
Dale
session drummer
session drummer
Posts: 537
Joined: Tue Oct 03, 2006 9:21 am
Location: Aus

Post Sat Jan 06, 2007 10:49 am

drkwb wrote:Any sound man that can't get a good sound without a hole is a moron.

Low end frequencies need room to expand. When they put the mic inside a hole in the front head they are capturing the sound of your batter head, 6 - 12 inches away. Which is where you would want the mic to capture the low end frequencies of the batter head. Unless you are looking for that old school mid range Lars Ulrich sound then place the mic 2 - 3 inches from the batter head pointed directly at the beater and forget about the tone of your drum.

To capture the low end frequencies of the from head without a hole try maybe placing the mic 6 to 12 inches in front the of resonant head.

Ever notice that bass amps sound better when you step away from them? Same principle. Lower frequencies are bigger, physically and move slower therefor they need more room to spread out.

So next time a sound guy insists on a hole just ask him nicely to try placing the mic 2 inches off center and 6 - 12 inches in front of the head. If he complains about feedback or isolation then be prepared to drape a moving blanket over the front to isolate the mic. (this also works great in the studio).

Porting a bass head does affect feel and tone so it is the drummers perrogative to port or not. Keep in mind when porting start out small and go up to find the sound and feel you like. Yes, the amount of air you are letting out does matter. If you make the hole too big, depending on the size of the drum, you might as well have no front head at all.

Resonant bass heads are no different than resonant tom heads. Thickness, material and coating all make a difference so don't let any sound guy tell you what to do if you are happy with the sound and feel of your drum.

Also keep in mind if you bury the beater on your batter head when you play and put a mic inside you will loose the bennifit of the front head resonating to compensate for the batter head being muted when you bury the beater.

I personally bury the beater weather I play heel up or down, but I tune my bass drum to allow the resonant head to resonate and bring back the fullness that I loose from burying the beater.

Imagine that, a resonant head adding resonance. Things that make you go hmmm....

Next time a sound guy suggests you cut a hole in your front head suggest he do the same to your bass players speaker cab to get a better sound from inside. But chances are if he's the type of idiot that thinks you have to port a bass drum then he probably insists on running the bass guitar direct as well.


I like the way you think. The pity is that many sound men are morons who are flubbing around trying to appear as if they know what they're doing.

If I do cut a hole in the resonant head, I make sure it's as small as possible, and dead center.
I don't know what I'm talking about!

"Don't play FOR people. Play WITH people."
- Papa Jo Jones