Recording software

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masonvonritchie
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Post Fri Oct 13, 2006 7:48 pm

I'm sure most of you have been through the recording process, whether it be in the studio or at a buddy's house. I'm trying to get started on recording but I'm not sure about what software I should get. I've had a little bit of experience with Cakewalk before and it worked pretty well, but there's like 10 different versions of Cakewalk. I'm thinkin Cakewalk Sonar Project5 version 2 is the way to go, best bang for the buck for under 200. I have a mixer so all I really need is the software. Thoughts??? :?
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Mad_cow
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Post Sat Oct 14, 2006 8:35 am

umm, if you want a simple free recording program that supports effects, use Audacity,

Its also open source so there are tons of mods for it,

But I've also used Acid, its ok but not my favorite,
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funkdrmr
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Post Sat Oct 14, 2006 8:48 pm

Here's some questions for you that will help me (and others) help you. FWIW, I work at a recording studio as well as record remotely and at home.

1. Budget

2. Will you be recording drums?

3. You mention that you have a mixer, but do you have an interface to get your mic signals from the mixer into your DAW?

4. Do you have any studio monitors? If not, what would you be mixing with?

5. What microphones do you have available for your use (make/model)?

6. Is this just to record your own band, or do you want to start a "bedroom studio" to record friend's bands & the like?
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masonvonritchie
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Post Sat Oct 14, 2006 11:38 pm

1. Budget: About $200

2. Will you be recording drums? Eventually, yes.

3. You mention that you have a mixer, but do you have an interface to get your mic signals from the mixer into your DAW? Yes

4. Do you have any studio monitors? If not, what would you be mixing with? No

5. What microphones do you have available for your use (make/model)? A Nady Starpower 9

6. Is this just to record your own band, or do you want to start a "bedroom studio" to record friend's bands & the like? This is just for my own work.
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Post Sun Oct 15, 2006 5:15 am

The band im currently playing for do it similar.
we use cubase SX run of souped up pc...(soon to be mac).Run 12 mono mic channels (kik/snr/rak/flr/flr/oh/oh/amb/amb) and some for guides. into a digital a-dat (a compatible digital/hd recorder will do) then take an optical out..into the soundcard.

Cubase and Pro tools are strong as each other. we find editing 'on the fly' easy, aspecialy for drop ins if a take is bad.

usualy use 2x AKG D112 on the kick. (batter and front head) Shure sm58s on snares and toms. a couple of Behringer B1 for overheads..AKG c100 for hats/ambient and a couple of old skool PZM's for room ambience.. best thing is to experiment.. untill you get a good sounding formula
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jwoo10
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Post Sun Oct 15, 2006 5:30 am

I've been tracking drums in my home studio for about 4 years now...
I started with N-Track.. (free version)..
Moved up to Cubase SX..
7 mic's
Shure Beta 52 Kick
3 Nady tom mics
Shure sm57 for my snare
two Nady Condensor's for overheads (both Large and Small diaphrams)

a Peavey 12 ch mixer

an M-Audio Delta 1010LT sound card

I do all my own mixing/paning/adding efx/ have TONS of plug-ins for the best sound depending on the song

Listen for yourself at my myspace site

have completed 3 cd projects so far and tracked drums for litterally 100's of songs with folkd from the entire globe in just about every genre you can imagine... it's a tremendous source of satisfaction.

have more Q's... look me up
funkdrmr
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Post Sun Oct 15, 2006 5:48 am

masonvonritchie wrote:1. Budget: About $200

2. Will you be recording drums? Eventually, yes.

3. You mention that you have a mixer, but do you have an interface to get your mic signals from the mixer into your DAW? Yes

4. Do you have any studio monitors? If not, what would you be mixing with? No

5. What microphones do you have available for your use (make/model)? A Nady Starpower 9

6. Is this just to record your own band, or do you want to start a "bedroom studio" to record friend's bands & the like? This is just for my own work.


For $200, Project 5 seems a pretty good bet. There are other options, but it all comes down to features and functions that you will need out of each. Research that price market on Mus. Friend etc... as much as you can to check out the features & reviews. I think you will find that most of the software is extremely similar in features and function. It just depends on what brand you want to
try out.

Check the company websites for free demo trial versions of the software. That may answer more of your questions than any of us here can.

There are TONS of ways to record drums. I asked, because the number of inputs on your interfaces will affect how you mic the kit up & get it into your DAW. Separated tracks are always nicer to work with in the computer, but there are micing techniques that you can use to get a great drum sound with a very small number of microphones.

Studio monitors are a very important putchase to think about. Not that it can't be done without them, but there are budget-minded solutions out there. Keep in mind these monitors SHOULDN'T make everything sound good. They should be flat, revealing, and portray accurately the material going through them. It is the engineer's job to make it sound good through these monitors. Once that is accomplished, the mix should translate well to any other system the CD is listened to on (car stereo/home stereo, etc..)

As far as the StarPower 9 microphone goes....it may very well be good to get started with, but you will probably notice a very large difference by upgrading to just a Shure SM57. The SM57 is one of THE standard mics used in a studio, good on everything from drums, guitar cabs, and even vocals.

Hope that helps. I know your initial question really only had to do with software, but I'm trying to show you that it's only a small piece of the chain by having you think about some things you may need to deal with to get the final recording where you want it.

If you are just wanting to get started recording to see what it's all about and learn along the way, I think you are off to a good start. You can check out www.homerecording.com/bbs and www.gearslutz.com for a TON of info on the subject.

If you are very critical of your recordings and want them to sound somewhat comparable to what you hear on the radio, it more than likely will not happen with what you have or will have in the near future. If this is the case, I would urge you to visit a recording studio near you and save yourself the frustration. Hourly rates are generally not too bad, especially if you do a song at a time, then save up & go back in.

Another plus with the studio setting....you could go in there, use some really nice gear to record tracks with, and then bring the raw files home to play with. If it just isn't working out, you will still have the option of having the studio engineer do the mix down, and all will be good.

Hope that helps. I'm trying to be as "middle-of-the-road" as possible.
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masonvonritchie
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Post Sun Oct 15, 2006 10:54 pm

Thanks for the advice man. That helps alot. Recording is something I've never really done but want to get into and maybe go to school to be a recording engineer.. Who knows... But anyway, thanks dude.
WANTED: Tama Starclassic B/B!

Pacific CX Series kit
Pork Pie Little Squealer 13x7
Zildjian A Customs, Z custom
Wuhan China
DW5002AD