Damping the toms?

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zen_drummer
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Post Sun Dec 03, 2006 12:15 am

I leave mine wide open, let 'em ring!

Seriously now, learn to tune. Spend time with them and tune them over and over again. It's not hard. Once you get it, you'll never struggle with it again. Drums are SUPPOSED to ring. They sound BETTER out front than at the kit, even close miked.
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Chazdrums
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Post Mon Dec 04, 2006 1:46 am

There is no reason to dampin the heads. Get good heads and learn to tune! Drummers need to tune just like the rest of the band. Does your bass player dampin his bass if it doesnt sound good? Even with cheep drums you can get good sounds, just keep trying!
"Almost everything I've done, I've done through my own creativity. I don't think I ever had to listen to anyone else to learn how to play drums. I wish I could say that for about ten thousand other drummers."

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drummerboi
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Post Thu Dec 07, 2006 3:29 pm

I don't "use" any foreign material to dampen my drums. Just use the right heads or the right kind of drums. I use the e-mad on the batter and a eq3 coated on the resonate for my bass....ec2 clear on batter and resonate on bottom for my toms... and a hd dry for my snare. If there is too much sustain, you could go to birch instead of maple.... i like using both kits... depends on how i'm feeling.
Mike T
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Post Sun Dec 10, 2006 7:32 pm

Daneman wrote:
Mike T wrote: Buy a old Cream or Vanilla fudge cd listen to the drums they do not ring but are clear and sound awesome..Drummers Ginger Baker cream,Carmine appice Vinilla fudge..i have been playing 41 years..


That's partially true. What you forgot to mention is that Ginger didn't close mic his toms when recording- look at any of the old 60's pictures from Drummerworld or anywhere else. He only used a kick mic and overheads to record his entire kit.

I bet that if his toms were close miced there's be a bit more ring to the drums than you'd think. Not a ton of uncontrollable ring, but it would be there....


That is a good point ..alot has changed since the late 60's and early seventies as far as Micing...but i still like the sound of Dampened drums and precise tuning just gives them life ..also we do not know how much or if Ginger used the mufflers but they were on his drums that i do know .. :)
Daneman
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Post Wed Dec 13, 2006 1:17 pm

Mike T wrote:
Daneman wrote:
Mike T wrote: That is a good point ..alot has changed since the late 60's and early seventies as far as Micing...but i still like the sound of Dampened drums and precise tuning just gives them life ..also we do not know how much or if Ginger used the mufflers but they were on his drums that i do know .. :)


Yeah I know what you mean- I play a '56 WFL- they can still be a bit on the ringy side depending on the heads/tensioning, but those mufflers do come in pretty handy. I'm by no means against muffling, I just know many a drummer who takes it a bit too far (funny side note- someone suggested I use Dead Ringers IN STUDIO to muffle out the ring. Wha????).

Isn't it ironic though that today's high end drums all have features to make them as resonant as possible- thin maple shells, double 45 edges, minimal contact hardware- and the first thing everyone wants to do is muffle the hell out of them.
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Post Wed Dec 13, 2006 3:56 pm

its all in the tunning, never had to dampen mine, and friends kits I've played on who tried to dampen I was able to take off their moon gel/duck tap/e-rings after about a minute with a drum key and they sounded great. I think drummers make the mistake of not taking their tuning as seriously as musicians who "Play notes".
AlcalaProject
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Post Fri Dec 15, 2006 9:59 pm

I guess it all depends on your taste, some guys like the ring of a tom while others like me can't stand ringing in any of my toms, bass and snare..........

But tuning your drums make a huge difference and I tune as much as possible to get most of the ringing out but even with that I use Remo "O" rings to eliminate it........I have switched to coated heads and my bass drum head is a SuperKick II with the dampening ring inside.........

As for guitarists not having to dampen their bass or guitar is ludacris because with all the effects they have its like comparing apples to oranges...........

If I had a Electronic drumset then obviuosly I wouldn't have to dampen by drums would I!
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Spydr2000
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Post Sat Dec 16, 2006 11:26 am

I use moongels if I have to mainly floor toms. Sometimes a I muffle the bottom head and not the batter side with a small piece of paper about 1" x 1", that worked well on my export kit I had about 12 yrs ago.

For the bass drum I will always use a pillow. I like powerstroke 3 heads but it's just not enough. I can't believe so many people are playing w/o muffling in their kick drum, I personally don't like the beater responce from open drum.

My tuning tips.. tune bottom head of tom slightly higher than top that will reduce some overtones.

And for the kick drum I tighten the batter head just enough to get the wrinkles out and leave the front head real loose to get a nice slap sound off of it. Use a small amount of muffling, I prefer DW bass drum pillow.
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clatterdrums
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Post Sat Dec 16, 2006 12:09 pm

Let those babies RING!!! :D
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downshifter99
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Post Sat Dec 16, 2006 12:45 pm

It IS all in the tuning combined with good heads :idea:

Most of the drummers of yore had toms with only a batter head(no reso).

I use Evans Ec2s on my toms,tune them up real good and let them sound the way they are supposed to sound(all the other instruments in a band will cut the ring out).

Pearl maple drums....music to my ears :idea:
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zen_drummer
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Post Sat Dec 16, 2006 12:53 pm

Spydr2000 wrote:My tuning tips.. tune bottom head of tom slightly higher than top that will reduce some overtones.


ummmm... are you sure about that?

I think you might have just told these folks how to increase overtones...
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Post Mon Dec 18, 2006 7:33 am

It's all about personal preference, but I agree that the proper heads and tuning eliminate the need for any damping. Tuning takes a lot of practice and trial and error to find your perfect sound. I started experimenting with different heads and tuning tensions (using a Drum Dial). Once I found good starting points (with heads and tensions) it became much easier to refine the tone by ear.

Personally I don't like a whole lot of resonance anyway and these heads seem to work well for me (with no damping required)

Snare: Evans Genera Dry
Bass: Evans EQ3
Resos: Evans G1 Clear

For toms I use Evans Black Hydraulics for live performances. Which give a really warm, wet, fat sound. These sound good even if your tuning skills aren't that great and they seem to hold their tone well without a lot of retunings, even if you beat the hell out of them.

For recording I use G2 coated which gives much more ring than the hydraulics but it's not too much. Besides, you can always remove some ring in mixing / mastering. But you can't add any if you've excessively dampened your sound.

Lastly, I think zen_drummer is correct, to reduce overtones the bottom head should be tuned slightly lower than the batter head.
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Post Thu Dec 21, 2006 7:15 pm

Tuning and dampening are two tottaly different things and one has nothing to do with the other..what i mean is OF course you must tune your drums,as most have stated in this post <>get the right heads and tune or the right drums <> hog wash 21st century thinking you have been fed a line of BS...

Tuning goes without thought if you do not tune your drums (dampened or not )they will not sound right and they will not drop in pitch according to size . Now what does damening have to do with that ? NOTHING!...

To dampen is personel taste as we drummers do not tune to notes like a guitar player almost every drummer tunes to his or her personel taste,and or the music he or she is playing,again that has nothing to do with dampening..

Dampening is a sound like a fuzz box or a tube screamer is to a guitar it is just a sound..i like the PUNCH of dampened drums they cut through the mix they do not disapear into it,you get more individual sounding drums dampened because they each have a distinct sound while lots of overtones or ring tend to blend the sounds together taking away from each drums individual sound...my two and 1/2 cents..merry xmas everyone
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Darrin64
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Post Thu Dec 21, 2006 8:44 pm

Over the years I have went from deadringers, moongel, pinstripes, hydraulic heads, and now I don't muffle at all. I do though use the new evans heads with the silver rings in them . I like the tones I can make with them. The snare I use an aquarian focus head. I love the way it makes my masterworks snare sound. I do still muffle my kick some mainly because I like the feel of it better and still sounds great with my shure beta 52 mic on it. 8)
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zen_drummer
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Post Thu Dec 21, 2006 9:15 pm

Mike T wrote:I like the PUNCH of dampened drums they cut through the mix they do not disapear into it,you get more individual sounding drums dampened because they each have a distinct sound while lots of overtones or ring tend to blend the sounds together taking away from each drums individual sound...my two and 1/2 cents..merry xmas everyone


Your two and 1/2 cents may be suffering from the ill-effects of inflation...

1) Dampened drums don't cut through the mix, they get lost in it.
2) All the discussions about shell construction and materials, bearing edges and drum "tone" that take place on this site point towards the fact that drums are supposed to ring... it's the ringing that get's them to project through the mix. This is a pretty well established fact.
3) Drums sound different in the audience than they do on the stage right next to them. It begs the question... who are you playing for? If you're performing for a crowd, make them sound good IN THE CROWD.... they'll need to ring on stage if they have a chance to be discernable in the mix and project to the crowd. If you're playing your drums so you can sound like a bad 1970's recording ON STAGE, then dampen the hell out of them. The good news is the only person that will hear them is you, and you seem to prefer the sound of drums that mimic the sound of the shipping boxes they came in, so you should be pretty pleased with that sound. But hey, if thats the effect you're after, knock yourself out.

But thanks for the Christmas wishes.
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