how to stop cymbals cracking

Where to buy, how to cleaning etc...

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anavrinIV
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Post Tue Sep 26, 2006 4:34 am

my old drum instructor swears that if you break a cymbal youre playing wrong...and hes one of the few i know thats played for 30 years and never broken a cymbal. ive seen this guy play with the same pair of sticks for a year and not have them break, and hes not a light hitter, its just a matter of technique

that being said, ive broken a few pies myself. two crashes have broken from the edge pretty badly, one because i was using the wrong technique and angle, and the other because it was cheap and id bash it because i didnt care...both of those were zildjians and one only lasted a year, the really cheap one lasted on my set for almost 3 years (planet z hihat top, converted to really bad crash/splash). i have a paiste full crash thats cracked internally and has been like that since the day i got it (damn ebay....) but the sound hasnt been affected, only the volume....it still baffled me as to how the crack formed and how it still sounds good after a year of playing it. ive also cracked one of my zbt hihats so i inverted them and that seems to be doing the trick. plus it gives me a reason to get new ones...same with the paiste when i get some money (itll be a 17" aaxplosion if i have a say about it....).

for me, cracking cymbals in inevitable. i know that itll happen but i still hate it because at 17 i dont have a lot of disposable income to throw around on cymbals. the good news is, though, that i know lots people who have never broken sabian cymbals and thats what im primarily using, and mine show no signs of giving up soon even though i love to ride my 18" aaxplosion to death.
zen_drummer wrote:Real life doesn't work that way, and one day he's gonna pull a stunt like that and they'll put a cap in him. At that point it won't matter that he was fat in high-school and couldn't get laid.
idolxcid
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Post Tue Sep 26, 2006 3:11 pm

Never cut a triangle or a v into your cymbal..
That only accilerates the crack..
Alwayse cut a semi circle or cut all the way around the cymbal
to make it small..

If you have multiple cracks then use a nice grinder to cut around
them and dont go all the way around the cymbal if possible.
The smaller the cymbal gets the easier it is to break.
"I'll stop playing loud when you pry the drumsticks from my cold dead fingers"
Jim Freak
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Post Fri Sep 29, 2006 6:23 am

Since I started playing about 7 years ago, I have broke about 6 cymbals, and I've changed my hitting technique many times but everytime I change I break my cymbals in many different ways, sometines just a crack, sometimes, a little piece falls, and now that I put my cymbals in a different angle I haven't broke any cymbal for about 5 months, i think more than just the technique is more on how you put them, of course is necesary to hit them right, just look on how you are setting it up. Hope this helps you.
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DreamT
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Post Sat Oct 21, 2006 11:32 pm

I tried the drilling thing on my A cymbals but, for me, the break just goes on through the hole I drilled. I switched to K cymbals though and haven't broke one since. I went through about 4 A cymbals before my wallet just got to hurting too much.
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Mapexkiller
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Post Wed Nov 15, 2006 3:00 pm

All i did to take care of the problem was to make my cymbals out of iron. You do go through a lot of sticks though...
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drumobsessed
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Post Wed Nov 15, 2006 3:17 pm

Some guy said on the last page about not caring if you break cymbals.

Not all of us can afford that buddy! ;) And it's not easy to get sponsored by a decent company unless you're in a well-known band or are an absolutely phenomenal independent drummer and already play that brand.
changlab
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Post Wed Nov 15, 2006 3:38 pm

the facts....If you play rock or moderatly loud/heavy on your drums.... you WILL

break sticks
break cymbals
and your drum heads will go dead

Guitarist break strings
Singers break balls
Drummers break anything that aint nailed down
bass players can break things too, but, a guitarist has to show em how to do it!

j/k
Jamie
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Post Wed Nov 15, 2006 6:15 pm

Ya, buy good cymbals. Im using my dad's Zildjian Brilliants he bought 30 years ago, and I've been using them ever since I started. So what does that tell you? Just buy good cymbols and make sure to take good care of them.
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downshifter99
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Post Wed Nov 15, 2006 6:41 pm

LEARN HOW TO HIT THE CYMBAL OR HAVE A WHOLE BUNCH OF MONEY!!!
Taye:Rock Pro Classic Rock 5 Piece
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fas-tedz
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Post Thu Nov 16, 2006 4:00 am

:twisted: Cymbals wear out, just like heads. You wouldn't expect a drum head to last forever.... Right? Drums and cymbals sound best when you hit them HARD. Angle them, finesse them... the bottom line is: they have a life span, and they're gonna die. JUST LIKE US!
Push 'em to their potential!!!! There's something special about a real drumstick hitting a real cymbal or drum and the resulting sound that it makes. If you pound on something long enough, it will break, just gotta deal with it.
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downshifter99
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Post Thu Nov 16, 2006 8:43 am

fas-tedz wrote::twisted: Cymbals wear out, just like heads. You wouldn't expect a drum head to last forever.... Right? Drums and cymbals sound best when you hit them HARD. Angle them, finesse them... the bottom line is: they have a life span, and they're gonna die. JUST LIKE US!
Push 'em to their potential!!!! There's something special about a real drumstick hitting a real cymbal or drum and the resulting sound that it makes. If you pound on something long enough, it will break, just gotta deal with it.

For the most part you are correct.....but,people like Neil Pert that still has some of his old cymbals that he's had since day one.
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Rob Crisp
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Post Thu Nov 16, 2006 10:13 am

I've never broken a cymbal, though I have seen a few cracked and holed ones.

I was taught to play with a slicing movement and a twist of the wrist. Not only should that stop them dying so quickly but will also allow them to "open up" and give the best sound.

I have a Zildjian Avedis 18 inch thin crash, which was second hand when I first bought it. I hit hard but it keeps on going! Love it!
Dale
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Post Sat Nov 18, 2006 7:04 am

I'd like to put a different spin on it here.

I think some cymbals break due to pressures involved in transportation. Often they develop mininute cracks that cannot be seen or heard. They then crack along these later. If a cymbal is carted around in a case, it will feel the shock either on its edge or within the hole in the bell if carted in a cymbal case with a bolt through it. This pressure builds up as time passes through the vibration felt during driving and being placed heavily down on the ground. As well as that from playing.

As someone said, copper is a maleable metal, and so is tin. I learned this in my youth when I became a blacksmith and spent 4 years at tech studying metalurgy.

There are ways to use technique so that cymbals wont break. The glancing stroke being the safest. It is also important to understand that each and every cymbal has a built in limited volume. Basically, a cymbal will only go so loud. So there is no point trying to smash excess volume out of it beyond its capabilities. Work within the volume inherant in each cymbal.

Another drummer posting above gave some excellent advice. Don't place your cymbals overly high. The lower they are, the easier it will be to strike them correctly. (Bearing in mind that every person's physicality differs. So this may not be true for everyone)

As for transporting them safely? My prefered way is to use sheepskin "socks" and place each cymbal in its own sock. Then put them in a case. Or you can alternatively place your cymbals in a soft cymbal bag, and then place the cymbal bag inside a hard case. The Protection Racket cases are very good for this.
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Tmac
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Post Fri Nov 24, 2006 9:42 am

I usually average 1 crash per year and I use an 18 inch z-custom, and they always crack in the same spot, right on the Z on the zildjian stamp. :D
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sharkscott
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Post Fri Nov 24, 2006 9:57 am

Do what I did, use lighter sticks. It has saved my wrists and my equiptment too.

I used to be a heavy hitter but I just can't do it anymore. Its like throwing firewood around all day, my wrists can't take it any more.
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