Recording drums

Post here anything about the world of drumming. Equipment, music, drum gear, artists, events, gigs, and anything else drum set related!

Moderator: Moderators

User avatar
Shalaq
session drummer
session drummer
Posts: 674
Joined: Sun Jul 30, 2006 3:24 am
Location: Poland

Post Sat Sep 02, 2006 3:37 am

Any tips regarding playing in the studio/recording? Do you know any tricks to get the most out of your drums? What sizes work best for studio use?
Mapex, Istanbul Agop, Attack, Vater/O4D.
I want an endorsement :)
Quick link to the search engine:
http://www.drumsmylife.com/search.php
in regards to myself
beginner
beginner
Posts: 10
Joined: Fri Aug 25, 2006 2:23 pm

Post Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:02 pm

i know that u should hit ur drums hader then u hit ur cymbals but dont hammer ur drums just play them like u normaly would just try to hit drums harder then cymbals that all i can say
I saw Jesus on the beach
Drum Naked
new
new
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 12:18 pm
Location: Arizona

Post Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:07 pm

Play YOUR drums and cymbals. The sound engineer will set up the mics and mix them. Play as you normally would. HAVE FUN and enjoy the experience. Check out how Danny Carey Miced his set. He use mics on both kick and two overhead mics to catch everything else. the sound is amazing!!!!!!!!
DRUM NAKED..... YA GET AN EXTRA BEATER
vintage
new
new
Posts: 7
Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 4:51 am

Post Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:27 pm

I have found that if your drums sound great and have lots of sound (minimal damping/muffling) all you need is a hot room and you can get some really powerful recordings with minimal mic'ing.
funkdrmr
beginner
beginner
Posts: 42
Joined: Tue Aug 29, 2006 2:25 am
Location: Honolulu, HI

Post Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:48 pm

1. The room is the most important factor. Untreated or bad sounding room = bad sounding recording.

2. Drum tuning is a close second or tie for first with the room. If the kit sounds great in the room, it will sound great recorded.

3. PRACTICE YOUR SONGS WITH A CLICK! It is MUCH MUCH easier to fix little mistakes when the song is recorded to a click. Among other reasons for playing with a click in the studio, it allows much more flexibility in the recording process when you want to change something down the line. Learn to groove with the click BEFORE you start tracking, and your performance across the board will be much tighter!

4. Start with the overheads, and get the kit sounding good through them first. Do a Google search for the "Recorderman" overhead placement technique. It REALLY opened up the sound of my kit. As stated above, it helps to have a good drummer who doesn't wail on the brass. Also, make sure you not only get a good sound from the OH's, but also a good stereo image. Kik & snare in the center, etc...

5. Add a kick mic or 2, depending on what you want. AKG D112 is a really good kick mic, as is the beta 52. For a "multiple" micing technique on the kick, try putting the D112 just inside the batter head, a Shure SM57 all the way in, and maybe a condensor about 2 feet in front of the drum & off-center.

6. Add a snare mic or 2, again depending on what you want. The SM57 is pretty much the standard, but other mics will work as well. Don't get stuck thinking you have to aim across the head in order to get a good snare sound. For instance, in my room with my Black Beauty snare, I get the best sound (crack and body) by pointing a SM57 down at the shell from the side, with the mic almost pointing straight down to the floor, and the grill of it about 1/4 down the depth of the drum.

That's really about it. A lot of people like tom mics, including myself. I always like to have the option to reinforce them in the mix if one tom was hit a little weaker on a fill, and stuff like that.

I just finished tracking drums for my band's debut album, and I learned a ton through the process of reading some other boards and preparing. Bar none, the room, head selection and tuning had THE MOST EFFECT on the sound than anything else I had.

Oh...sorry, one more thing. KNOW YOUR PARTS! hehe Record practices just to get a feel of the structure of the songs before you even think about spending time in the studio. It will help you in more ways than one! By recording practices you can refine the structure of the entire song as a band AFTER practice, and you might be surprised as some little accents or guitar riffs that are going on that you just won't hear when everybody is blasting at rehearsal. This will then help you to refine YOUR part, and by studying it and learning it in such a way your tracking experience will go a lot smoother.
Trash
beginner
beginner
Posts: 20
Joined: Wed Aug 30, 2006 1:50 pm
Location: El Lay, CA

Post Sat Sep 02, 2006 3:54 pm

Shel Talmy (Kinks, etc.) got absolutely awesome sounds with three mics on the drums.

Pretty sure Eddie Kramer did the same with Bonham.

Why do 80s drums sound so shitty?

One reason is they got to the point where they were putting mics on the tops AND bottoms of toms.

Can you say 'phasing problems'?

Oh why the hell should you guys care? Everything is triggered now anyway....
User avatar
Fudman
beginner
beginner
Posts: 36
Joined: Thu Aug 17, 2006 7:10 pm
Location: Galt, CA, USA

Post Sun Sep 03, 2006 1:08 am

Trash wrote:Oh why the hell should you guys care? Everything is triggered now anyway....



um ya maybe..............

ok I dont know what your talking about.

Noralf Ronthi(zeromancer) recorded a demo for the song Mosquito Coil in a garage useing 2 mics. and compressed it alot and thay souded so good some of it made it to the final cut of the song(drums changed a bit from the demo). so to say its all triggered is saleing it short a bit.
its possible to get good sound from any setting you just need to know how to master it.
veerubio
beginner
beginner
Posts: 18
Joined: Sun Sep 03, 2006 4:02 am
Location: tx

Post Sun Sep 03, 2006 4:10 am

Trash wrote:
Oh why the hell should you guys care? Everything is triggered now anyway....


Then Y bother playing an acoustic set? I mic when i record for the sound. I only use electronic drums to add effect or other sounds not produced natrally to my set.

i have one mic for bass(inside),snare(under),each tom (top) and the 2 overheads in an x pattern.

Live is almost the same with the execption of one overhead instead of 2 and i have a headset to sing with.
funkdrmr
beginner
beginner
Posts: 42
Joined: Tue Aug 29, 2006 2:25 am
Location: Honolulu, HI

Post Sun Sep 03, 2006 10:55 pm

Trash wrote:Shel Talmy (Kinks, etc.) got absolutely awesome sounds with three mics on the drums.

Pretty sure Eddie Kramer did the same with Bonham.

Why do 80s drums sound so shitty?

One reason is they got to the point where they were putting mics on the tops AND bottoms of toms.

Can you say 'phasing problems'?

Oh why the hell should you guys care? Everything is triggered now anyway....


I don't mean to be rude, but this info is completely inaccurate.

Yes, a lot of great recordings have been made with a minimal mic setup.

HOWEVER, if you read about these setups, you will find that it actually has a lot to do with the actual drummer playing the kit, and the room that it is sitting in. Bonham was so good, that he would adjust to how the mics were set up. Once they were set up, he would adjust and hit 1 tom softer than the others, along with other intricate things that we probably don't know. He was also well known for wailing on the kit, yet being light on the cymbals when recording. Advice to drummers continues even today to play in this fashion to get the best drum sound possible. Unfortunately, not all drummers are able to adjust their playing in this fashion.

As far as phasing problems with micing the tops AND bottoms of toms, check this thread out:

http://www.gearslutz.com/board/showthre ... t=Skid+Row

In that thread are tons of pics, and on that page pics of the drum setup in particular.

Mr. Wagener is actually using the phasing of the tom mics to keep cymbal bleed out of them.

My point being, that a killer drum sound can be had this way with someone that knows enough about their gear and how to set it up.

Also, "Everything" isn't triggered nowadays. There are definitely cases now where it's the norm, but it's all depending on the type of music, and what kind of sound is being captured during the recording process.
User avatar
jw11
new
new
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Oct 11, 2006 2:36 am

Post Thu Oct 12, 2006 7:31 am

Where would be the best place to record my drums at home?