Best Way to Clean Cymbals

Where to buy, how to cleaning etc...

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Rob Crisp
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Post Mon Dec 18, 2006 4:32 pm

I heard tomato sauce works somewhere, so I tried it and what do ya know, finger prints gone in minutes! If you try it just be careful not to leave on decals too long... that stuff will strip em off!

Course, you're shiny cymbals smell like a Heinz factory....
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quikstang2
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Post Mon Dec 18, 2006 4:36 pm

drum_masta wrote:I know this is off topic but does any one know ideas about taking rust off hardware?


Steel wool. It'll scuff up the surrounding chrome too though. I don't think there's a way to actually get rid of rust unless you were to go to an autobody place and have them spray it with some certain stuff (I forget the name), but all your hardware will be black.
If you scuff it all off try spraying it with a clear coat of spray paint, you should lay down some adhesion promoter first.

Not proven technology, so don't hold me to it. I may try it on some of my hardware this week.
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zen_drummer
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Post Mon Dec 18, 2006 10:06 pm

downshifter99 wrote:Breaking in a cymbal?....It's not a motor.
Wake up and smell the amps!!!
Whoever told you all that stuff is a fool. :idea:


Not really...

When you play a cymbal, it goes through a process called "work hardening" and the crystaline structure of the bronze is actually altered by the stick striking it, so in essence, it does "break in".

Hand Hammering a cymbal is also work hardening it, but since you're hitting it with a hammer instead of a wooden stick, it has a more profound effect. "breaking in" a cymbal happens over a MUCH longer period of time and it is far more subtle than whacking it with a hammer.

For the math junkies out there, There are two common mathematical descriptions of the work hardening phenomenon.

Hollomon's equation is a power law relationship between the stress and the amount of strain.

Ludwik's equation is similar but includes the yield stress,
Image
Image

where K is the strength index and n is the strain hardening index.

If a material has been subjected to prior deformation (at low temperature such as hammering) then the yield stress will be increased by a factor depending on the amount of prior strain.

Image

The constant K is structure dependent and is influenced by processing while n is a material property normally lying in the range 0.2-0.5. The strain hardening index can be described by:

Image
This equation can be evaluated from the slope of a log(σ) - log(ε) plot. Rearraging allows a determination of the rate of strain hardening at a given stress and strain
Image

Any Questions?

Bueler??

Anyone?
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Erik
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Post Mon Dec 18, 2006 10:37 pm

Hi.
*If* you want your cymbals clean,
I use "Fantastic" spray and paper towels.
Never had a problem.

I once used specialy made cymbal cleaner, but it
was very harsh (basically just a metal cleanser)
and if you use it over the brand name writing
ie: "Zildjian" or "Paiste" etc.. written in black, the
cleanser can take that right off.

For rust on hardware: Clean it the best you can,
make sure it is dry, then with AWESOME Schwarzenegger
strenght, rub layers of flat aluminum Foil over the rusted part.
Something about the hardness scale here (you know, diamonds
are a 10). If you are getting rust because of humidity, get a
dehumidifier and cover your drums with a thick sheet or blanket.
(that is my best advice) (sorry it could not be better).
good luck :)
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The Heel
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Post Mon Dec 18, 2006 11:05 pm

zen_drummer wrote:
downshifter99 wrote:Breaking in a cymbal?....It's not a motor.
Wake up and smell the amps!!!
Whoever told you all that stuff is a fool. :idea:


Not really...

When you play a cymbal, it goes through a process called "work hardening" and the crystaline structure of the bronze is actually altered by the stick striking it, so in essence, it does "break in".

Hand Hammering a cymbal is also work hardening it, but since you're hitting it with a hammer instead of a wooden stick, it has a more profound effect. "breaking in" a cymbal happens over a MUCH longer period of time and it is far more subtle than whacking it with a hammer.

For the math junkies out there, There are two common mathematical descriptions of the work hardening phenomenon.

Hollomon's equation is a power law relationship between the stress and the amount of strain.

Ludwik's equation is similar but includes the yield stress,
Image
Image

where K is the strength index and n is the strain hardening index.

If a material has been subjected to prior deformation (at low temperature such as hammering) then the yield stress will be increased by a factor depending on the amount of prior strain.

Image

The constant K is structure dependent and is influenced by processing while n is a material property normally lying in the range 0.2-0.5. The strain hardening index can be described by:

Image
This equation can be evaluated from the slope of a log(σ) - log(ε) plot. Rearraging allows a determination of the rate of strain hardening at a given stress and strain
Image

Any Questions?

Bueler??

Anyone?


Do you believe that cleaning a cymbal would in any way be detrimental to the breaking in process or the sound you get from them when they are broken in?
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zen_drummer
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Post Thu Dec 21, 2006 8:59 pm

Do you believe that cleaning a cymbal would in any way be detrimental to the breaking in process or the sound you get from them when they are broken in?


Detrimental? I would have to say it all depends on what you consider to be detrimental!

Dirt on a cymbal effects the tone in the long term as it gets driven into the crystaline structure of the bronze. Some would say the tone will be detrimental, others strive to have this effect.

Suffice to say that if you want your cymbals to sound as CLOSE to the way they sounded on the day you bought them, then keep them clean. If you want the sound to get more complex, then let them get a little dirty and play 'em that way. In either case, they will change over time, and the dirtier they are, the more dramatically they will change.
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Kaindog1
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Post Wed Jan 03, 2007 9:52 am

Brian, I use all paiste cymbals and Paiste told me to use Pledge on there cymbals, NOT!! lemon Pledge just the regular Pledge, Not sure how it would work for REAL dirty cymbals but if used from the start and spayed like every 1-2 weeks it works great.
drumdan
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Post Wed Jan 17, 2007 1:23 pm

Paiste cymbals come with a protective coating applied at the factory. I clean them the same way I do my lacquer finish drums: Zymol hd cleanse, then an application of Zymol "creame" wax. For turkish style cymbals I find Zymol, or Meguiars wheel cleaner does the best job.
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LadyThunder
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Post Mon Jan 22, 2007 10:29 am

The amount of time you are willing to spend cleaning your cymbals is the main factor here. Sure the spray "cleaners" like Groove Juice and others work, but don't get the best results. I use Zildjian Cymbal Polish. This stuff works wonders for your cymbals. But you have to devote a great deal of time with this polish especially if you are trying to avoid the logos, because this stuff will strip 'em off quick. I just grab a bundle of shop towels and go to town. I have found this polish to work best on the brilliant finish, and your cymbals will look brand new if not better.

happy polishing... :)
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zen_drummer
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Post Tue Jan 23, 2007 2:33 pm

LadyThunder wrote:But you have to devote a great deal of time with this polish especially if you are trying to avoid the logos, because this stuff will strip 'em off quick.


Why is everybody so concerned with the logos? I'd rather not have that grafitti all over my cymbals.

When big black logos first started appearing on cymbals in the 1980's I remember thinking I would have a cymbal with the Zildjian logo on it when Armand Zildjian puts a tattoo of my name on his forehead...

I've calmed down in my old age, but I don't care if the logos are worn off or not. For what they charge for their overpriced slabs of bronze they shouldn't put advertising on them.
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Shalaq
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Post Tue Jan 23, 2007 11:15 pm

Second that Zen_d! I want to leave the signature and remove the info on the type of cymbal. I use all my cymbals as crashes and rides ;)
But I don't really care what is written on my cymbals. They sound great and that's it.
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drummerman002003
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Post Mon Feb 26, 2007 2:43 am

KETCHUP...The acidics in it will take the grime right off...though it also will take the label off with it...So if you wanna keep the label on there there go with other then that...if not...Ketchup works wonders
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screamkevin
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Post Mon Feb 26, 2007 9:52 am

zen_drummer wrote:Why is everybody so concerned with the logos? I'd rather not have that grafitti all over my cymbals.


That's another reason that I love my Saludas. The logo on the underside of the cymbal is the standard black ink logo, a bit smaller than most, but the logos on the top of the cymbals are acid-etched. I like having the logo, but prefer the etched so that it doesn't detract from the look of the instrument.

You can see the small logo in this pic.

Image
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brandon8robinson
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Post Mon Feb 26, 2007 2:03 pm

I put BAM on it, that like glass cleaner stuff. It didn't really clean it.
I got it from uh, the get wet shop!
SheebCTE
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Post Mon Feb 26, 2007 3:55 pm

Groove juice works great, except that it left some odd stains that developed about a month after i cleaned them