New Router Table! Bearing Edge Questions.

You want to know how to build the kit of your dreams...? You can find help here!
Questions and discussions.

Moderator: Moderators

New Router Table! Bearing Edge Questions.

Postby johnisonfire » Wed Aug 27, 2008 2:56 pm

I just purchased a router, a 45 Degree Chamfer bit and a 1/4 Roundover bit. I built a router table to do my edges. I'm going to practice on a no name bass drum and rack tom shell that I bought off ebay. Before I started, the shells had a single 45 degree edge with no roundover. I added a roundover to the outside edge of the shell, and it turned out pretty awesome. I'm pleased with myself as this was my first try at bearing edges. Now the real challenge, getting the inside 45 degree edge. I think it's just messing with router bit heights above the table surface vs. thickness/plys of shells.

The rack tom is a 10x12 and I would like to make it an 8x12. I've already plugged the old lug/vent holes so it pretty much is a ready to cut/edge/drill. The only problem is, I don't want to buy a table saw just to do this. Is there a specific router bit available that I can use to cut down this shell while "rolling" it in place against the fence? I was planning to cut the shell down and re-cut new edges. If there isn't, it's not a big deal, because within the next month I'll be buying a raw snare shell to build and since I save quite a bit of money getting it raw without edges, if I screw it up beyond salvage, it wont be a horrible loss.

Another thing I'm curious about, when I was cutting the outside edges, I experimented with the Big "O" method of turning the shell around the bit (as seen in the Sonor Factory Tour Video and the Spaun Drum Co. Factory Tour) and also the steering wheel method. I was browsing the ghostnote forums and they seem split on the issue. I was just curious as to what the builders here (especially P.J) did. They both felt pretty good, but I applied the pressure against the bit bearing more evenly while using the Big O, so I'll probably stick to that.

The router table is a great investment. Looking at the money I save with getting the shells raw, the whole set up will be paid off in about 6 shells. I'm quite excited about it. Enough for me to practice as well as add to the amount of snares/drums I have. Also the table is big enough for me to use also as a wrap cutting table. Two sawhorses, the router, three bits, the MDF for the table top as well as the MDF for the sanding tables, lumber for bracing and sandpaper all came out to about $200 with careful shopping around (Home Depot, Lowe's, Woodcraft, Harbor Freight). There were also a few other little things in there like drill bits, rollers, screws, glue, long ruler, filler, etc. I didn't want the cheapest stuff out there, but something that didn't break the bank that could still fuel my new found hobby. Luckily I work at Lowe's and so many of the stuff I got had a 10% employee discount.

Sorry for the epic post, I'm just all giddy with the prospects of what I can do. I'm pretty much willing to take that 10x12 shell and cut it slowly down to a 4x12 just so I could continually practice and perfect my bearing edges. I bought it solely for practice and maybe if I'm lucky turn it into something that matches the bass drum that i got it with. So my questions are:

1. Big O or steering wheel method for turning the shell around the router bit? Maybe there's a drawback or benefit from one that I haven't heard of yet.
2. Is there a bit that I can use to cut down a shell with a router? if so, what bit?
3. Is there such a thing as a full roundover bearing edge and if so, how do I achieve this? A buddy of mine says truth custom drums do this as one of their edges, but I think he may be talking out of his arse. It just sounds like a symmetrical dual 45 with the flat edge rounded but I could be wrong.

Next thing is to practice snare beds.

Thanks,
John
Set 1: Self built custom drum set
Set 2: Ludwig Accent
Cymbals: Meinl Byzance Traditional, Meinl Byzance Jazz
johnisonfire
drumming adept
drumming adept
 
Posts: 224
Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2007 5:45 pm

New Router Table! Bearing Edge Questions.

Help our forum grow and visit our sponsors pages!

Help DML grow and visit pages on left!
 

Postby Empyrean Drums » Wed Aug 27, 2008 3:12 pm

You can use a double fluted straight bit, like http://www.routerbits.com/cgi-routerbits/sr.cgi?1219874394_11532+12 just do a rough pass with a jig and cut the majority off first so on the finish pass you're only cutting less then the radius of the bit
User avatar
Empyrean Drums
groove master
groove master
 
Posts: 1760
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2007 8:22 am
Location: Aurora Colorado

Postby johnisonfire » Wed Aug 27, 2008 9:29 pm

Empyrean Drums wrote:You can use a double fluted straight bit, like http://www.routerbits.com/cgi-routerbits/sr.cgi?1219874394_11532+12 just do a rough pass with a jig and cut the majority off first so on the finish pass you're only cutting less then the radius of the bit


Thanks, I had a feeling that the straight bit would work, just wanted some clarification.
Set 1: Self built custom drum set
Set 2: Ludwig Accent
Cymbals: Meinl Byzance Traditional, Meinl Byzance Jazz
johnisonfire
drumming adept
drumming adept
 
Posts: 224
Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2007 5:45 pm

Postby Timekeep69 » Wed Aug 27, 2008 9:34 pm

I use the big O method but I usually make two passes. I also do it freehand.

I use a table saw to cut shells down.

Yes you can do a full round over, you just cut both sides with the roundover bit and then sand down where they meet.
www.pjclevenger.com

www.medicinemandrumsaz.com

DML Special: 20% off all drums.

Two wrongs don't make a right, but three rights do make a left!
User avatar
Timekeep69
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 3403
Joined: Sun Aug 06, 2006 6:50 pm
Location: Phoenix, AZ

Postby Empyrean Drums » Wed Aug 27, 2008 9:48 pm

No matter what method you use, running a test piece to get a feel for the tool is cheap insurance
User avatar
Empyrean Drums
groove master
groove master
 
Posts: 1760
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2007 8:22 am
Location: Aurora Colorado

Postby johnisonfire » Wed Aug 27, 2008 10:41 pm

You guys are totally awesome. Thanks for the advice. I liked the Big O for the smaller drums and when I did the bass drum countercut I preferred the steering wheel. Both edges turned out great after smoothing them out, and they sit flat when I place them on a flat surface. So far I'm really delighted.

Yeah the test piece is pretty much that beater tom and bass drum I got off ebay. Im just taking my time before I start ordering Keller shells.

I probably will invest in a table saw before the year is over, but for now the straight bit will probably have to do. Money, space and lack of things I'll use it for is preventing me from getting one. I probably won't even cut down the tom because I've re-cut the edges, the depth is around 9 3/4" now with better edges. I'm also tempted to buy a 1/8" roundover bit and try the roundover edge on the same shell. Should be interesting.

After that I'll Stain and high gloss. This is turning into a practice kit for me. Practice building skills and a playing practice kit that I could keep at the bass players house that we practice at.

Thanks for all the advice Empyrean and P.J!
Set 1: Self built custom drum set
Set 2: Ludwig Accent
Cymbals: Meinl Byzance Traditional, Meinl Byzance Jazz
johnisonfire
drumming adept
drumming adept
 
Posts: 224
Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2007 5:45 pm

Postby AmnestysLowEnd » Tue Sep 02, 2008 8:35 pm

Timekeep69 wrote:I use the big O method but I usually make two passes. I also do it freehand.

I use a table saw to cut shells down.

Yes you can do a full round over, you just cut both sides with the roundover bit and then sand down where they meet.


You mean you don't use a table?
7 piece Pearl EXR
Saluda cymbals
AmnestysLowEnd
session drummer
session drummer
 
Posts: 944
Joined: Tue Jul 24, 2007 12:05 pm
Location: Miami, Fl


Return to Masterworks

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: CommonCrawl [Bot] and 1 guest