Recording software

All about drum recording technique, mics, software etc...

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m
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Post Sat Feb 09, 2008 8:06 pm

to me, recording is no different than playing an instrument. You learn it and improve the more you do it.
If music is an important part of your life, and you want to be able to compose and compile your own ideas, it's not a bad idea to start with home recording and learn as much as you can. The technology has come so far recently, you really can put together a decent homestudio for a reasonable investment.
That investment pays off over the years, as the $ you'd pay for tracking, mixing, etc- go straight into your own studio.
If its not something you're interested in, or have the desire to learn about, or plan to do much of, then by all means go into a place with a good reputation and get your ideas preserved. But if you want to do it yourself, it is possible to get good at it. Might take a while though. :-)

But, I heartily recommend setting up your own rig and learning the gear and techniques if that's something you think you'd enjoy.
It's just one more aspect of your music/art that you can control yourself. With some hard work/research/LOTS of practice you can learn a lot.

For the money you can spend to make a CD demo or two at a studio, you could setup your own project studio that could be turning out endless CDs for years to come.
RobDrmz
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Post Sat Feb 09, 2008 8:28 pm

I've been making records for many years now and there is one phrase I have learned that works on every level.

"RECORDS ARE MADE IN REHERSAL"
Keep tha FUNK alive!
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drumur
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Post Sat Feb 09, 2008 9:44 pm

For the money you can spend to make a CD demo or two at a studio, you could setup your own project studio that could be turning out endless CDs for years to come.


This is so true
SGarrett
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Post Sun Feb 10, 2008 2:14 am

m wrote:to me, recording is no different than playing an instrument. You learn it and improve the more you do it.
If music is an important part of your life, and you want to be able to compose and compile your own ideas, it's not a bad idea to start with home recording and learn as much as you can. The technology has come so far recently, you really can put together a decent homestudio for a reasonable investment.
That investment pays off over the years, as the $ you'd pay for tracking, mixing, etc- go straight into your own studio.
If its not something you're interested in, or have the desire to learn about, or plan to do much of, then by all means go into a place with a good reputation and get your ideas preserved. But if you want to do it yourself, it is possible to get good at it. Might take a while though. :-)

But, I heartily recommend setting up your own rig and learning the gear and techniques if that's something you think you'd enjoy.
It's just one more aspect of your music/art that you can control yourself. With some hard work/research/LOTS of practice you can learn a lot.

For the money you can spend to make a CD demo or two at a studio, you could setup your own project studio that could be turning out endless CDs for years to come.


This is very true and why I bought my own setup. But, if the budget is around $400, nobody really knows how to run sound, and they want a decent sounding demo...going somewhere might not be a bad idea.
"If the goal is for me to give up my reality for your reality, then the goal is for me to give up my self for your self--a goal I have to reject."
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m
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Post Sun Feb 10, 2008 7:49 am

SGarrett wrote:This is very true and why I bought my own setup. But, if the budget is around $400, nobody really knows how to run sound, and they want a decent sounding demo...going somewhere might not be a bad idea.


agreed.