Lessons...

Post drum lessons here! Share your talents, give some tips, or get new tips and learn to play new stuff!

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drumsforlife
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Post Thu Jul 05, 2007 4:07 pm

There's been a new music store open up in my area that is now offering lessons for a decent amount a month. I talked to the owner and he has a very good drummer from the local scene doing the lessons. He also knows some other drummers willing to take on students right out of their house. Now I'm self taught. I've been playing 6 years, but for the past 2 years I've been digging deeper and deeper into the drum world and I've been trying to learn as much as I can to better myself. I've been to a few clinics, and I was enrolled in one semester of percussion methods my first semester in college. So the formal training is minimal. I have a decent understanding and ability to play the rudiments, and not only that, I can apply them to the kit. With my recent contact with the Arts Exchange here in town, I'd like to play the best I can and represent musicians in the area with putting my best foot forward. What, if I start lessons, should I expect? I know I'll be learning out of a book, but what else as far as learning the fundamentals like grip, time, notation, etc? I have 16 years classical training on another instrument so I happen to believe I have a leg up. I believe lessons would be a great advantage, but I'd only be able to pick up about one one hour session a month. Would it be worth it?

Thanks!
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Rob the Drummer
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Post Thu Jul 05, 2007 7:32 pm

It would definitely be worth it! Not only would you learn new things about drumming, it's always good to get another perspective of drumming from an experienced drummer. I really enjoy just hanging out with other drummers to get their angle of drumming, kinda like this forum. Learning is a never ending process, so I say go for it. You will thank yourself in the end.
Rata-tata-zzzzzzz......Drums Always!

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ccrdrums
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Post Thu Jul 05, 2007 10:36 pm

Rob the Drummer wrote:It would definitely be worth it! Not only would you learn new things about drumming, it's always good to get another perspective of drumming from an experienced drummer. I really enjoy just hanging out with other drummers to get their angle of drumming, kinda like this forum. Learning is a never ending process, so I say go for it. You will thank yourself in the end.






smart man ,but what i do is take lessons once a week for about 2 months then go and teach myself for 2 months its working i progress quickly
In order for God to increase we need to decrease.
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Homki890
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Post Thu Jul 05, 2007 11:18 pm

Expect to feel small, lol. That's how I felt when I got my lessons from the Jazz Drumset Professor at the local university. Bout shat my pants watching him. Never EVER tune the guy out, and do what he tells you. More than likely, he knows what he's talking about, so you have an expectation to at least try it out.

If you're worried about rudiments, look no further than vicfirth.com, or The Rudimental Cookbook and Just Desserts by Edward Freytag. Those will get your chops up on the rudiments.

Homki890
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Rob the Drummer
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Post Fri Jul 06, 2007 4:20 am

Homki890 wrote:Expect to feel small, lol. That's how I felt when I got my lessons from the Jazz Drumset Professor at the local university. Bout shat my pants watching him. Never EVER tune the guy out, and do what he tells you. More than likely, he knows what he's talking about, so you have an expectation to at least try it out.

If you're worried about rudiments, look no further than vicfirth.com, or The Rudimental Cookbook and Just Desserts by Edward Freytag. Those will get your chops up on the rudiments.

Homki890


Good points! "Expect to feel small." There is always a degree of humility in drumming. No matter how good you get, there are drummers that will destroy you! But that's not what drumming is about, just remember we're all here because we love drumming. If you wanna know your rudiments, you gotta work for it. You gotta put the hours in if you wanna be good! Another thing is to respect all other drummers, better or not, you can always learn something from watching! (something I learned from my good friend Hawk) You should always be confident about what you can achieve, but have a sense of knowing where you are. I feel like I've been playing and studying forever(16 years), there is still soooo much to learn!
Rata-tata-zzzzzzz......Drums Always!

www.youtube.com/robthedrummer
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Gaddabout
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Post Sun Jul 08, 2007 4:05 am

drumsforlife wrote:There's been a new music store open up in my area that is now offering lessons for a decent amount a month. I talked to the owner and he has a very good drummer from the local scene doing the lessons. He also knows some other drummers willing to take on students right out of their house. Now I'm self taught. I've been playing 6 years, but for the past 2 years I've been digging deeper and deeper into the drum world and I've been trying to learn as much as I can to better myself. I've been to a few clinics, and I was enrolled in one semester of percussion methods my first semester in college. So the formal training is minimal. I have a decent understanding and ability to play the rudiments, and not only that, I can apply them to the kit. With my recent contact with the Arts Exchange here in town, I'd like to play the best I can and represent musicians in the area with putting my best foot forward. What, if I start lessons, should I expect? I know I'll be learning out of a book, but what else as far as learning the fundamentals like grip, time, notation, etc? I have 16 years classical training on another instrument so I happen to believe I have a leg up. I believe lessons would be a great advantage, but I'd only be able to pick up about one one hour session a month. Would it be worth it?

Thanks!


Don't assume you'll be learning out of a book. Some instructors just write stuff out as you work on it. The best instructor I ever had literally wrote pages as we taught. I have three or four pages of stuff just on the cascara. I'd play it one way, and he'd come up with 20 other applications, like, "Hey, let's make the cascara funky," or "Can you make it swing?" We didn't work out of books ... I suppose mostly because I'd already been through the important ones. He was teaching me at a different level, very personal and specific.

It really depends on the instructor and what you want to learn. I think you'll find most have two agendas: Help you achieve what you want to achieve while steering you towards things they think you need to know.
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drumsforlife
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Post Fri Jul 13, 2007 9:44 am

Thanks so much for the feedback. I went and had another talk with the owner and I know for a fact that the drum teacher teaches out of a book. The name of it escapes me at the moment. As far as rudiments go, yea I'd like to be more proficient at them. Rudiments are the drummers' language. It's like scales on the snare. On trumpet I had to learn all 12 major scales, two octaves, as well as each "flavor" of minor scale for each key. Then as I progressed, I learned all the modes and that the scales as I know them came from that. I would love to learn that kind of stuff for the drums. I already think that I'm a very decent player on kit, but I'd like to learn other stuff, and learn how to apply the knowledge, especially hybrids of the rudiments. Above all else it's not about how good or showy I want to be, it's more the fact that I'd like to be doing it right, and with accuracy. It's kind of frustrating to be carrying on a conversation with another drummer, and hear them talk about stuff you have no clue about, and then ask them to play what they're talking about so you can understand it. I'm a musician, and I want to be musical with the instruments I play. Money's a little tight right now, which is why I was considering this in the first place. It may not be until next year, but I'm definately going to take some lessons. I can only do like one lesson a month because I have a very busy schedule at work. Especially this month, we have a shit-ton of remote broadcasts, special promotions, and concert ticket give-aways scheduled. BTW, I work at a radio station so the hours are kinda odd. I love it. It's something different everyday. So thanks for the feedback and I'll be sure to update on my progress!
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AaronBland
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Post Tue Oct 09, 2007 1:50 am

Good luck, the more knowledge that you can accrue, the better you will feel about your abilities and the more tools you will have to use to be creative.

keep on keepin' on!

www.AaronBland.com
As long as our hearts still beat, we are tuned into the rhythm of the world. www.aaronbland.com