Novice: Help with developing a practice routine.

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freefaller
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Post Mon Nov 24, 2008 3:18 am

So I am a novice at drumming. I would like to set up a routine to improve my drumming. I do not know what I am good at or bad at. I have set around 1 - 2 hours day to practice drumming. Please can someone help me get started? Is it possible to have a routine that can cover all the basics of drumming like practicing with hands and feet etc or would there be too many things to practice with one routine. Thank you for your help.
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rufus4dagruv
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Post Mon Nov 24, 2008 8:59 am

The simple answer to your question is yes, it is possible to have a routine. What I would recommend is finding a private instructor in your area who can observe what you're doing, your strengths and weaknesses, and have them recommend a routine for you. If that's not a reality for you, then I would suggest first getting familiar with rudiments. Here's link that could be useful to you:

http://www.vicfirth.com/education/rudiments.html
freefaller
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Post Mon Nov 24, 2008 8:04 pm

Thank you. What else can I practice on?

I know I can practice fills maybe some base exercises as well? Any other types I could add in?
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ChrisNichols
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Post Sat Nov 29, 2008 12:18 pm

Rudiments for sure. And learning grooves is also a good way to start, standard quarter time, eighth time, shuffle, 6/8, that sort of thing. Those are pretty basic grooves and a good place to start.

And I don't think you need to have a specific routine that you adhere to every day. Play what you feel like playing, just jam every now and then - this is supposed to be fun!

By all means learn the basics and such but mix it up a bit too. Personally I rarely sit down and just work on technique for an entire session. Most of the time I just plug in the iPod and play along.
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bass-ackwards
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Post Sat Nov 29, 2008 1:48 pm

Rudiments are for hands and feet, dont forget that.
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dtenor
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Post Sun Dec 07, 2008 6:36 pm

1. Make sure you do rudiments like crazy just on a practice pad or snare drum.

2. Look online for drumset music (http://www.onlinedrummer.com), or buy a book (http://www.amazon.com/Advanced-Funk-Stu ... 0825825539). If you can sit down and sight read material, you need to find more dificult stuff and challenge yourself.

3. (Most important) Always play with a metronome. You can easily tell what drummers play with a metronome and which ones don't. If you don't believe me, try to maintain a tempo playing a swing at 60 - 70 bpm. Playing material slowly with a metronome will help you line up your hands and feet.

4. Make a list of your favorite beats and play through them for just a few minutes everytime you sit down to play. Eventually you'll memorize them and have a lot of stuff to pull out of your head when you're just jamming.
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shine.fm-youth
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Post Sun Dec 07, 2008 7:00 pm

practice rudiments like mentioned above,
play along to music at first
it's not really "most important" to practice along with a metronome but it does
help a great ton
as long as you're practice to music at first to hear and play along with a beat you'll be fine
find an instructor if you can or if you an afford one i know they can be pretty expensive

most important is just play dude
all the time
if you don't have a drum set tap on stuff
if you can't tap on stuff listen to music in your head
i know that sounds lame but if you can "in vision" yourself playing something
it'll help out a lot
just constantly listen to all kinds of music
and play all the time
those are the key things

you'll hit walls all the time every does
don't let that get you down
and don't get discouraged because someone can do it better
take that as a motivation to learn how to do it
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Rob Crisp
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Post Thu Dec 11, 2008 8:56 am

The problem is everyone has different practice ideas, routines and things they wish to work on. So the best thing you can do is, as Rufus suggested, get a good teacher who can help you.

Rudiments and technique exercises are all good to work on as well (google Dom Famularo for technique).