World's Slowest Drummer Competition

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Postby BLS2112 » Tue Aug 07, 2007 10:18 am

xdoseonex wrote:they compare it to baseball players having a home run derby


But I love baseball...lol
Kind of like Bonds will get the record but he'll never have the "class" of Hank... ';o]
Think there will be a "Oh Barry!" candy bar?
Wait, that wasn't actually named after Hank was it? ':oI
TC...Barrie
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And Microsoft free...
Buenos Nochas Meinen Freunden... ';o]
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Postby soliddrummer » Fri Aug 10, 2007 11:04 am

Jojo Mayer has both groove and speed with control. He's fun to watch and listen to. I used to think Thomas Lang was all speed and no groove until I saw the last song on Creative Control dvd during the credits, "Batti e respi" which he plays in the pocket.

I would challenge all drummers out there to analyze your playing right now. If you're more focused on speed, study some groovy drummers, i.e. John Blackwell, or songs with that pocket feel. If you're a drummer who prefers the groove, get into some speed metal. Every time I've improved as a drummer it's been because I've taken the step out of my musical 'comfort zone'.

What I love about playing drums is that it builds on itself. Once you think you've 'arrived' you are promptly given more material to learn. The possibilities are endless! Creativity is constantly changing and evolving. So, don't get defensive and make excuses, embrace it! Learn something new! :)
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Postby mattsmith » Fri Aug 10, 2007 12:46 pm

BillRayDrums wrote:The last word-

Nobody EVER got fired for playing too much groove.

Thankyoudrivethru


Absolutely true Billy. And in your case you're the real thing, and it's pretty obvious to anybody that you have groove coming out of your ears and the chops too. But far too many people now are believing their crap technique is a sophisticated groove that the drummers who actually practice don't understand. To me it's just a lot of BS. Take this rant for instance.

lordofthunder said:IT'S ABOUT TIME!!!!!!!!!!!DRUMMING,FIRST AND FOREMOST IS AND SHOULD BE CONSIDERED A MUSICAL JOURNEY NOT A PHYSICAL ONE(ALBEIT IT IS TO A POINT!!)WHILE I'M NOT SO SURE A WORLD'S SLOWEST DRUMMER CONTEST WILL ESTABLISH A RELEVENT POINT,IN MY OPINION,THE RELEVENCY OF THIS IS AKIN TO THE WORLD'S FASTEST DRUMMER CONTEST!!!!!!!!!!!!MY POINT IS TO KNOW EXACTLY WHAT THE FUCK YOU ARE DOING FROM ALL ASPECTS OF THE KIT .KNOW YOUR RUDIMENTS,TAKE THE TIME TO LEARN HOW TO READ.COVER ALL ASPECTS FROM COVER BANDS TO ORIGINAL MUSIC TO LIVE AND STUDIO WORK!!!!!!!IT'S BEEN SAID THAT LESS IS MORE.THIS IS TRUE IF YOU HAVE THE WHOLE VOCABULARY IN YOUR ARSENAL,IF YOU DON'T LESS IS LESS AND 0+0=0.POINT STATED!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Now what is this exactly?

It's a lot of convenient fenced in assumptions coming from somebody who has never seen a WFD, and feels capital letters and exclamation points makes his post true and accurate, when all it does is make said incorrect assumptions easier to see. The implication is obviously that we don't read, can't get around a kit, possess no musical background, and know nothing of rudiments, when in fact the contest he uses as his prime example is about nothing but rudiments. And he is right, in many cases less is more, but in this way of thinking it's nevermore. Besides, you have to have the chops first not to use them. Anything else is just a guy with no skills, and yes you can hear the difference.

I like soliddrummer's suggestion in the last post.
But you can rest assured that most groove cops will think it's beneath them to work on their chops, when they're exactly the ones who need it.

You can always tell it's two weeks after a WFD. They just start coming out of the woodwork. And there's always a guy who comes up with this world's slowest drummer line as if he thinks he's the first to say it. Yep, speed is overrated...I agree. But why is there always this assumption that those who actually have it are addicted to it like heroin, and idiots besides? Yeah there are speed nut jobs out there, but to me this whole groove guru act got old a long time ago. It's just too easy to pretend you're part of all that when you're not.
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Postby Daneman » Sun Aug 12, 2007 3:08 pm

Absolutely! I have a fellow drummer friend who is a great technician- he's obsessed with the latest tricks of the trade from from Portnoy, Thomas Lang, and the other prog drummers. But when I asked him to sit down and play something as simple as Booker T and the MG's "Green Onions," he absolutely could not play it to save his life. No sense of feel for the piece at all.

I don't have any problems with learning odd signatures, polyrhthyms, etc. I think it's essential in order to be a complete drummer. But by the same point, don't devote so much of your time to it that you can't groove on a simple beat.
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Postby Rob Crisp » Mon Aug 13, 2007 4:04 am

I love the fact this has inspired so many posts!

I've been reading through, lots of people saying speed is better, lots saying groove. I'm with those who can appreciate the technique and athleticism required to play speed metal and also appreciate the intricacies of brush work.

I could sure as hell not play some of the speed metal stuff a lot of you guys are playing, and for that very reason I have a respect for what you can do. If I sat down and put time in, sure I'd get there in the end, but right now I'm working on jazz.

If you try to play a groove, say a slow swing groove, it's harder to get it sounding tight and smooth and in time at slow tempo's than faster. I know, because I've had to really work on it. Don't believe me, play a typical swing jazz ride line, playing snare on each part of the triplet and keep it ghosted, under control hats closing on 2 and 4 and bass feathering on the quaters. Try it at 120 bpm, then try it at 80. Which was easier?

More space means more room for error. Fact.

Normally i play songs up to 200bpm with my band, to a click and when it came to playing to a slow walking bass line to practice jazz i was like "damn, that's harder than I expected".

And who said you cant play speed and slow grooves together, Buddy Rich! Nuff said!

*EDIT* When I say play each part of a triplet, I mean mix it up, say four bars playing the "trip", 4 bars playing on the "pa" and four bars playing the "let".
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Postby Empyrean Drums » Mon Aug 13, 2007 8:29 am

"More space means more room for error. Fact."

But there is the logical fallacy of this discussion. "More space" really just means more time, and more room for error regardless of the tempo being played.
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Postby xdoseonex » Mon Aug 13, 2007 9:16 am

anyone whos played drums knows its harder to make a groove feel righ while playing it really slow. it common knoledge
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Postby Empyrean Drums » Mon Aug 13, 2007 9:24 am

xdoseonex wrote:anyone whos played drums knows its harder to make a groove feel righ while playing it really slow. it common knoledge


Some things are harder to play slow, some things are harder to play fast. It depends on what "groove" being played and how fast/slow.
And I don't know, but I'm pretty sure I've played drums before
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Postby Empyrean Drums » Mon Aug 13, 2007 9:28 am

There are very few "facts" in regards to drumming and this topic, but lots of very passionate opinions. Try not to get the two confused
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Postby dave lynch » Mon Aug 13, 2007 7:12 pm

Empyrean Drums wrote:"More space means more room for error. Fact."

But there is the logical fallacy of this discussion. "More space" really just means more time, and more room for error regardless of the tempo being played.


Yes..That's the chalenge...Try playing some older Pink Floyd songs...Nick Mason has to be a different animat to handle those tempos...Yes I understand that it was different times then but keep in mind that most rock had faster tempos thoes days..!!
Not into all that competetive who's better crap..Just love to have fun when I drum..!! <|:O)

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Postby BillRayDrums » Mon Aug 13, 2007 8:02 pm

dave lynch wrote:
Empyrean Drums wrote:"More space means more room for error. Fact."

But there is the logical fallacy of this discussion. "More space" really just means more time, and more room for error regardless of the tempo being played.


Yes..That's the chalenge...Try playing some older Pink Floyd songs...Nick Mason has to be a different animat to handle those tempos...Yes I understand that it was different times then but keep in mind that most rock had faster tempos thoes days..!!


Once you understand how to feel subdivisions of the beat and use them accordingly, slow tempi are no longer a threat.
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Postby dkmfan » Mon Aug 13, 2007 10:25 pm

i play really fast punk rock but, before you can play fast you have to play slow. So when you practice make sur you start off slow. My drum teacher always used to tell me to slow down. you have to be able to slow down if you want to be good.
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Postby BillRayDrums » Mon Aug 13, 2007 11:19 pm

dkmfan wrote:i play really fast punk rock but, before you can play fast you have to play slow. So when you practice make sur you start off slow. My drum teacher always used to tell me to slow down. you have to be able to slow down if you want to be good.


This is my last one tonight. Promise!

Go watch the Karate Kid. All the "Wax on/Wax Off, Daniel-san" stuff is true.

I once witnessed something monumental. I was watching this guy one day down at the beach doing some form of very slow and controlled Martial Art, just digging his movements. These two asshole-types approach him and start blustering at him. He didn't break his concentration until one of them laid a hand on him and what happened next was so fast that if I had blinked I'd have missed it. He grabbed the guy's hand and flipped the one guy and with a sweeping kick took out the second guy.

And without even becoming rattled he went back to his slow-motion routine and the two idiots figured out they'd best leave this one alone.

When you practice slow, you allow your muscles to develop a memory towards what you are playing. Speed it up gradually and eventually you can start to feel where different rhythmic pulses sort of carry your playing along.
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Postby stu » Thu Oct 25, 2007 8:11 pm

I would seriously check out some of the doom metal bands out there if slow is what you want I recommend a band called Khanate. They are not for every body to say the least. They are not my cup of tea but they are slow. I think a lot of drummers dis on speed to take an indirect shot at metal drummers. I bring this up to point out the fact that not all metal is about speed. It's Not all good either
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Postby drumur » Thu Oct 25, 2007 11:38 pm

If you record yourself playing a groove, you'll hear what you really sound like. Do you sound Pro playing slow? Does your groove groove? Do you have a pocket that breathes? Do you know how to make the band, the audience, and the music feel good? That's what's really important when it comes to being a drummer and a musician. It's not how fast you can play, but how you play it that makes you who you are as a drummer. Record yourself at different tempos. Really listen. That's why studio drummers sound so pro...they listen to a lot of playbacks. They realize that what they thought they sounded like isn't what they really sound like and they correct it. : ) They discover what overplaying is and how obnoxious and inappropriate it can be. It's a sign of musical immaturity. Knowing what to play and when to play it is a sign of maturity and professionalism.
This is just my opinion.
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