How to learn jazz drumming

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Joezeppi
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Post Wed Jun 06, 2007 2:07 pm

I'm a rock drummer, specifically hard rock but sometimes melodic rock. So pretty much from what I've gathered jazz musicians are at the top of the food chain in competency when it comes to performance and technique. I saw this first hand when my brother who was already an excellent guitarist went to University of New Orleans jazz program and came out a musician who could play pretty much ANYTHING that was thrown in front of him with ridiculous ease. I know practice is key to attaining this goal, my question is, how can I learn how to play jazz as a way to increase my range of playing potential. Do I have to go to school for it? Are there any programs/videos/books that anyone could recommend that would get the ball rolling in as far as the basics, timing and such? Any help would be appreciated.
ghost_note
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Post Wed Jun 06, 2007 2:46 pm

www.drummerworld.com


on there you can watch some of the greatest jazz drummers solos which really helped me! and you can also find videos to help break down certain things and show you how to do it! hope this helps you as much as me!
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amontholdDrums
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Post Wed Jun 06, 2007 3:00 pm

Well the first thing i want to say is that jazz drummers are great.. but everyone has different qualities when it comes to drumming. jazz drummers do things alittle differently then say the chops guys.. the guys who do all of the fancy stuff are more or less robots then they are drummers sometimes.. mike portnoy.. great drummer.. robot.. jazz drummers.. and true jazz drummers just make the song work.. and when you play jazz.. youll realize it takes alot of paying attention and coordination. they have incredibly great chops but they get those chops from all the playing they do.. when learning jazz.. its alot easier to put yourself in situations such as joining a jazz ensemble and just sucking at it for a while.. rather then you having us tell you how to do it.. you figure it out on your own and it becomes a part of you.

But just some good things to think about how to learn it.. LISTEN to it. Figure out what the greats did and are doing. Go to a music store and talk with other drummers who know what they are doing.. check out the drum books they sell and see whats going on in them.. Reed's "Syncopation" has helped me alot cuz it gives you very basic rhythms and you can play a latin or swing ostinato then play the rhythm over it and it gets pretty challenging but its well worth it. Talk to every drummer and DEF go to www.drummerworld.com and watch the videos.. great knowledge
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hxc_adie
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Post Wed Jun 06, 2007 3:03 pm

personally, use syncopation pages and put it to swing. thats wahat helped my chops so much. and get the art of be bop drumming. works perfectly. if your really into it, i would even consider lessons
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ross666dreamcatcher
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Post Wed Jun 06, 2007 3:10 pm

Joezeppi wrote:I'm a rock drummer, specifically hard rock but sometimes melodic rock. So pretty much from what I've gathered jazz musicians are at the top of the food chain in competency when it comes to performance and technique. I saw this first hand when my brother who was already an excellent guitarist went to University of New Orleans jazz program and came out a musician who could play pretty much ANYTHING that was thrown in front of him with ridiculous ease. I know practice is key to attaining this goal, my question is, how can I learn how to play jazz as a way to increase my range of playing potential. Do I have to go to school for it? Are there any programs/videos/books that anyone could recommend that would get the ball rolling in as far as the basics, timing and such? Any help would be appreciated.


my advice would be to try not to think that jazz drummers have it all and if you learn jazz you can do anything. i would recomend finding yourself a drum teacher and explaining that you want to expand your vocalbulary and play more professionally. learn loads of different styles jazz isnt the answer to everything though it takes a massive ammount of disapline. at the moment i am focussing on jazz/swing, bossa/latin, samba and even drum n bass and jungle. i know i wouldnt have been able to do any of this n i wouldnt be at the level of playing i am now without my drum teacher so thats what i recomend. hey you never know you could make it to some session work, good luck to you
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sven913
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Post Wed Jun 06, 2007 3:28 pm

Yea, i just got into it not long ago. I really suggest you buy Syncopation by ted reed. my teacher had me reading it while i was mainly into rock, and it helped me so much when i started playing jazz. i still have alot to learn but its probably my favorite style. well. modern jazz. but just listen to some bebop and hard bop stuff first. id suggest learning the legit jazz styles first. then move on.
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Post Wed Jun 06, 2007 3:51 pm

ah another thing i though of. this could get into a heated debate with others but, I'm assuming you use use matched grip. now you can play jazz with both grips, i used matched for quite awhile while playing it, and still use it occasionally, but theres just something about traditional grip that makes you lay back more, and you need to be laid back most of the time, and it doesn't hold you back when your soloing when you get used to it. so check out some videos on traditional grip just to make sure you're doing it right, its gonna feel really strange at first, but don't give up at it. good luck
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Gaddabout
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Post Wed Jun 06, 2007 5:24 pm

Joezeppi wrote:I'm a rock drummer, specifically hard rock but sometimes melodic rock. So pretty much from what I've gathered jazz musicians are at the top of the food chain in competency when it comes to performance and technique. I saw this first hand when my brother who was already an excellent guitarist went to University of New Orleans jazz program and came out a musician who could play pretty much ANYTHING that was thrown in front of him with ridiculous ease. I know practice is key to attaining this goal, my question is, how can I learn how to play jazz as a way to increase my range of playing potential. Do I have to go to school for it? Are there any programs/videos/books that anyone could recommend that would get the ball rolling in as far as the basics, timing and such? Any help would be appreciated.


Jazz drumming as a technical pursuit is probably going to be disappointing for you. If the music doesn't inspire you, you'll never "get it." You'll never swing. I've seen people work through Chapin's books as a matter of principle (it used to be the standard in jazz drumming) only to sound like Chapin robots. Maybe they have some more independence, but nothing beyond what they practiced mindlessly out of the book.

I strongly urge you to get to an advanced instructor who can introduce you to the many time-tested methods that many rock, jazz, fusion, funk, whatever drummers have undertaken to advance their technique.

I'm going to suggest the biggest impact your instructor will have on you is not what he/she will teach you, but the much bigger music scene he/she will expose you too. There's a huge selection of music between rock and jazz, some of it combining lots of elements of both. You are more likely to discover a broader interest in music!
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break the prism
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Post Wed Jun 06, 2007 5:26 pm

read and study jazz drum theory (swung notes, syncopation, hi-hat technique, improvisation). most importantly watch other drummers and study what they do. listen to jazz albums, but try your best to watch, especially performance videos if you can't get out to see live shows. this will help very much because it is ultimately live where jazz happens.
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drummert2k
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Post Wed Jun 06, 2007 6:19 pm

finding a teacher and buying books wont make you a "jazz drummer" .it will only make you better at the genre.

there are many types of jazz you could play. it all depends on what you like and what moves you to pick up your sticks and play it.

but you cant just say one day, "i wanna be a jazz drummer." you stated you're a rock drummer? then you're pursuit would be a rock drummer becoming fluent in jazz drumming.

if you really wanna get into jazz, i'd recommend finding some "jazz katz" in your area and talk to them about as much as possible. not so much the playing aspect, but more for recommended listening so you can hopefully find something that really sounds good to you and go from there.
budbjames
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Post Wed Jun 06, 2007 8:16 pm

Joezeppi wrote:I'm a rock drummer, specifically hard rock but sometimes melodic rock. So pretty much from what I've gathered jazz musicians are at the top of the food chain in competency when it comes to performance and technique. I saw this first hand when my brother who was already an excellent guitarist went to University of New Orleans jazz program and came out a musician who could play pretty much ANYTHING that was thrown in front of him with ridiculous ease. I know practice is key to attaining this goal, my question is, how can I learn how to play jazz as a way to increase my range of playing potential. Do I have to go to school for it? Are there any programs/videos/books that anyone could recommend that would get the ball rolling in as far as the basics, timing and such? Any help would be appreciated.


By no means am I an expert at jazz drumming, but I've picked up a few tricks. The best advice is the advice that a lot of people are giving you. You need to find some jazz that you really like, listen to it, feel it, and then attempt to play it.

Take yourself out of your comfort zone... challenge yourself.. when you try to imitate what you hear, you'll end up finding a way to pull some of it off.

May I recommend some of my fav jazz drummers...

Max Roach, Buddy Rich, Gene Krupa, and Mitch Mitchell..

Good luck...
madchops
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Post Wed Jun 06, 2007 11:17 pm

jim chapin's advanced techniques

play along to miles, brubeck, and any other swinging stuff

nuff said

elvin jones max roach philly joe jones jo jones

and so many more

start small there
I think that any young drummer starting out today should get himself a great teacher and learn all there is to know about the instrument that he wants to play.

Buddy Rich
drumteacher41
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Post Thu Jun 07, 2007 6:44 am

First off jazz is very compicated to just explain over the internet. I dont know where u live but u need a very good teacher, who is educated and skilled in jazz style drumming. A good book is: " The Art of Bebop Drumming" by John Riley. Jazz is based on triplets. The triplets are usually felt as a rolling feel. The swinging feel is the key. The bass and snare much quieter and not the focus they are known as chatter. The ride cymbal and hi-hat are where the feel is coming from. The snare and bass kidnda feed off the hi-hat and swinging ride feel.

practice this Ding ding da ding, ding da ding dingda ding etc. this is counted 1 2 ah 3 4 ah 1 2 ah 3 4 etc. The ah is the skip beat.

Take that and play 2&4 steppin on the hi hat. Thn play these hands and feet patterns underneath.

LLF FLL LFL FFl FLF LFF practice slow arounf 60-80 bpm L= left F= foot. practice good luck.....DRUMTEACHER41
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Post Thu Jun 07, 2007 8:36 am

If you are really interested in learning jazz drumming then you have to start with learning basic shuffle beats, stroke roles and triplets. Shuffle beats will get your left hand working properly for the task and you will find that your left hand will soon become equal to and in some cases surpass the strength of your right hand. The stroke roles will enable you to define the subtle characteristics of alot of freeform and traditional jazz templates that are often used in this style of drumming as well as hone your dynamics. The triplets (GBT) fit in with all styles and is a favoured utility role even though it is a single stroke. As mentioned by a few of the other gentlemen on this topic, it is also a wise thing to consult players that have been playing it for a while as well as books and film footage of some of the notable greats such as Krupa, Rich, Bellson, Roach etc. Then it's up to your own self determination and drive to achieve what degree or level of proficiency you want to get to. Good luck and enjoy time.
andybfrank
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Post Thu Jun 07, 2007 9:46 am

I have a specific question. I'm not really that into jazz, although I respect it quite a bit and intend on playing more of it. I'm not that familiar with all the good jazz drummers, but I've listened to some Miles Davis and I love what the drummers are doing there. Specifically, I've heard Miles Davis Greatest Hits. There's some crazy bebop suff going on there that I can't even begin to pick up on. Can someone who knows the music I'm talking about give me some advice as to how to approach this style of playing? I just can't follow it. I can't even hear a pattern in some of that stuff, but it sounds really cool.