Recording practice

Post here anything about the world of drumming. Equipment, music, drum gear, artists, events, gigs, and anything else drum set related!

Moderator: Moderators

User avatar
kplante069
drumming adept
drumming adept
Posts: 441
Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 3:56 pm
Location: Cumberland, RI

Post Sat Feb 09, 2008 7:04 pm

How many people record their practices? In the last band I was in we would try to run tape when ever we could. Exspecially if we where just jamming around. Sometimes you can pull something out to work on a song. sometimes it"s just fun to listen to. We used to spend the first half our practice or so seriously working on what ever needed to be done. After that before getting burnt out on it we would kick back and jam out. It's amazing what you can pick up on tape you won't remember playing.
Image
User avatar
m
groove master
groove master
Posts: 1231
Joined: Sun Jul 30, 2006 1:13 pm
Location: Mobile/ATL/NOLA

Post Sat Feb 09, 2008 7:44 pm

I think every band should do that. Record shows too, then review them like sports teams to tighten things up.
Nothing like recording to see what's working and what needs work.

We've got stacks of DAT tapes, we just let them roll during rehearsals.
User avatar
kplante069
drumming adept
drumming adept
Posts: 441
Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 3:56 pm
Location: Cumberland, RI

Post Sat Feb 09, 2008 8:10 pm

I can even remember using a "boombox". We found if we threw a pillow over it it was enough to capture what was going on. Very helpful if you are in an altered state on mind while playing.
Image
User avatar
m
groove master
groove master
Posts: 1231
Joined: Sun Jul 30, 2006 1:13 pm
Location: Mobile/ATL/NOLA

Post Sat Feb 09, 2008 8:16 pm

I buddy of mine used to bring his boombox to shows, and if the band was OK with it, he'd stick it up onstage and record the show. He got pretty good at positioning it, and surprisingly the compression of a cheap boombox mic actually worked really well and made those indie/lo-fi shows pretty dang good!

Who knows if maybe the next rehearsal or show will feature your masterpiece of improvisation; it'd be depressing to have lost it forever if you don't remember how you did it. Record it all, I say! (you can always 'tape' over it later)
User avatar
break the prism
groove master
groove master
Posts: 1438
Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 5:22 pm
Location: Danbury, CT

Post Sat Feb 09, 2008 9:44 pm

i'm in a jam band so recording our sessions is just part of our method of operation.

shows get recorded one way or another by someone.
Beat on.
DrumsPlus
groove master
groove master
Posts: 1785
Joined: Fri Dec 21, 2007 9:03 am
Location: Galesville, WI

Post Sat Feb 09, 2008 10:38 pm

First time playing with a newly formed bad today. We recorded it so everyone could hear what they are like the first time out and then where to improve or what was good. I always think it's great to record yourself.
Image
_____________________
SilverFox HR Sticks
SGarrett
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 5166
Joined: Fri Jul 13, 2007 3:59 am

Post Sun Feb 10, 2008 2:11 am

I love to do that, but find myself having to convince bands I'm in that it's a good idea.

edit:
Oh yeah. Video tape your gigs! That way you can see your playing, too. That will help you see problems in your live playing faster than anything, instead of your friends blowing smoke up your ass about the gig.
Last edited by SGarrett on Sun Feb 10, 2008 2:56 am, edited 2 times in total.
"If the goal is for me to give up my reality for your reality, then the goal is for me to give up my self for your self--a goal I have to reject."
User avatar
FATHER TIME
drumming adept
drumming adept
Posts: 156
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2008 1:20 am
Location: SPARKS/RENO NV

Post Sun Feb 10, 2008 2:27 am

Hell yes, this is important. How often do you listen to a recording and have a better idea for a fill or groove. OFTEN for me. Also many arguments have been settled by the review of a tape. And of course, the drummer is usually right :wink:
ON A MISSION TO SLAY THE RUSH'N DRAG'N
<img src="http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj78/fathertime333/chrisdrummer.jpg" alt="Photobucket">
SGarrett
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 5166
Joined: Fri Jul 13, 2007 3:59 am

Post Sun Feb 10, 2008 2:45 am

FATHER TIME wrote:Hell yes, this is important. How often do you listen to a recording and have a better idea for a fill or groove. OFTEN for me. Also many arguments have been settled by the review of a tape. And of course, the drummer is usually right :wink:


Hahaha. That reminds me of a lady I used to play for. She had her demo tracked by one of those "we do everything, you just have to sing" studios. Anyway, we were arguing over whether this certain stop was on 1 or 2. I was like, "dude, I'm your drummer...this is why you hired me." Her response was, "well, I wrote the song, I think I know how it goes." So I told her to get a CD so we could listen to it. When it got to that stop she just looked at me and said, "oh wow, you're right." :lol: We actually did that twice. The first time I just smiled and said "see", but the second time I told her that she needed to trust my ability to count.
"If the goal is for me to give up my reality for your reality, then the goal is for me to give up my self for your self--a goal I have to reject."
User avatar
Rob Crisp
groove master
groove master
Posts: 2185
Joined: Wed Sep 20, 2006 2:19 am

Post Sun Feb 10, 2008 2:53 am

We actually have a 24 track mixing desk and mics, computers with recording software and we preiodically set up as we would in a pro studio just so we can record our tracks, see how they sound and tinker around with them.

I think any band who doesn't think recording practice is a good idea is biting off their nose despite their face. It can only help to highlight issues that need attention.
User avatar
BillRayDrums
Member Of The Year 2010
Member Of The Year 2010
Posts: 2009
Joined: Sun Sep 03, 2006 10:59 am
Location: Lower California

Post Sun Feb 10, 2008 3:25 am

Three words- "tape don't lie".
Go learn something.
User avatar
keith bushey
drumming adept
drumming adept
Posts: 129
Joined: Sat Oct 27, 2007 10:28 am

Post Sun Feb 10, 2008 8:01 am

We record about every 2 months, just to hear the improvements made. Its always a blast to hear how much better everybody gets!
Cubanedrummr
new
new
Posts: 7
Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2008 1:52 am
Location: Wilmington, DE

Post Sun Feb 10, 2008 10:09 am

I am all for it. I bought a Fostex digital recorder about a year ago. Still don't know how to use it. I got to the point of bringing it to practice and fooling around with it and getting everyone pissed off - like I was always wasting time. But the few songs I captured really told a story. One extended solo was perfect, because we could pick out what sounded good and what didn't, so we could chop it down and structure it better.

Recently, I bought this: http://www.pronto.com/mpm/Zoom-H4-Handy ... 4741527-CG

What an incredible machine. You turn it on, press record. Everytime you stop and start it, it starts a new "mp3 file". Afterwards, plug it into a computer via USB and you have instant sound files. You can record your practice and if you have a computer handy, download and burn and have a CD for everyone within 15-20 minutes, depending on the burn-time. CDs can be instant and your band can have their own copy that night.

We have used this thing live and for practice and the sound quality is out of this world. It's as if you were there. Here are the benefits I have gathered:

1) Listen to your parts/fills and actually hear if they fit. You can't ever tell this while you are playing, no matter how much you believe it. You would be surprised how different things sound when you aren't playing, while you're listening. When you step back, and just listen, you become the audience and you can tell if you are overplaying or "trying to fit a square where a circle should be." Sometimes, things are great in theory, but not reality.

2) Listen to your timing and the timing of your band. This is another area that is hard to assess as you hammer away. I fixed tons of transitional issues, slowing down, rushing, who's off..and the magic phrase applies: "the tape don't lie." You can avoid an arguement with your guitar player, who wants act like you're crazy for bringing something up or pointing out that he rushed through his solo - just listen back to it. The tape don't lie.

3) When you rehearse, listen to the order your songs are in. You can determine (like you were an audience member) how well the set flows - are there songs that are grouped closely that are too similart in tempo, key, feel, etc? How powerful are the openers and closers? Are they what you expected?

4) Lastly, you can actually hear the song, as if you didn't write it and its cheap. You don't have to wait until its studio-time and you need to shell out $350 a day. Buy this machine, or one like it and you won't regret it. You can drive around and almost "zone out" and hear the song, like it just came on the radio. Its really cool when you write a song and do this and end up saying, "Oh shit! This is us?"

With this machine, you can really analyze your technical game and figure out where to work on things. Sometimes, you worked all day and weren't thinking clearly...so, you messed a few things up as 8pm rolled around at practice. You can distinguish between a situation like that and lacking in the technical area by listening to your recordings. You can hear which fills were crisp and clean and which were thrown together. You may be able to hear that during rolls, your right hand hits a lot harder. You can now fix that and work on it. The possibilities are endless and I promise if you take it seriously, you can re-invent yourself as a drummer. Believe me, this did wonders for me and my band's sound vastly improved because of it.

Check us out...www.cubaneband.com
rockon2112yyz
drumming adept
drumming adept
Posts: 77
Joined: Sat Jan 13, 2007 3:31 pm

Post Sun Feb 10, 2008 10:47 am

alot of cool songs that my band would never remember how to play came out of a jam that was recorded
User avatar
Guy&i
beginner
beginner
Posts: 45
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2007 10:34 am
Location: Israel

Post Sun Feb 10, 2008 1:15 pm

Cubanedrummr wrote:Recently, I bought this: http://www.pronto.com/mpm/Zoom-H4-Handy ... 4741527-CG

What an incredible machine. You turn it on, press record. Everytime you stop and start it, it starts a new "mp3 file". Afterwards, plug it into a computer via USB and you have instant sound files. You can record your practice and if you have a computer handy, download and burn and have a CD for everyone within 15-20 minutes, depending on the burn-time. CDs can be instant and your band can have their own copy that night.


i acctually have that device! i got it from a dude who didnt know what it is for about 35$ :D
i didnt get the chance to use it properly though cuz i have only 256 megas on it. gotta get a new card.

ANYWAY - Record whatever u can whenever u can. cant do u any harm and the benefits u get of it are awsome.
i spent my first 5 years of playing recording with a boombox. i swear to god, the older it was the better the recording came out.
besides all the technical lessons u can learn of yourself and of how ur band functions, there r the laughs.
i still remember our singer fucking up a really fast song which eventually led us to use his screw ups in the song :D
peace be upon ya
Jah Bless