Drum rudiments

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Metal Mickey
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Post Sat Jan 26, 2008 3:15 am

Just wanted to ask: how vital are the 26 or 40 drum rudiments? How necessary is it to master them all before moving on?

Cheers.
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BillRayDrums
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Post Sat Jan 26, 2008 4:47 am

Metal Mickey wrote:Just wanted to ask: how vital are the 26 or 40 drum rudiments? How necessary is it to master them all before moving on?

Cheers.


There's never a "moving on". You play. THe concept of predetermined patterns for your hands are like lettes in the alphabet. How fluent do you want to be?

Then there's breaking each rudiment into different inflections. It's a language. You literally can spend 10 years mastering one rudiment. Take for instance, the single stroke. The most binary of strokes. Right-Left-Right-Left.
You can spend an enormous amount of time on that one alone. Paradiddles are a whole different thing. Flams, too!!

Bottom line- play drums. Practice rudiments. Enjoy the ride. Through osmosis you will start to bridge the two sides which are technique and listening.
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Metal Mickey
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Post Sat Jan 26, 2008 5:09 am

Okay, so there's never too much I can learn. But would you suggest learning the rudiments on the snare to a certain standard before working round the whole kit? Would that be my foundation?
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Post Sat Jan 26, 2008 5:19 am

That is exactly what I recomend and after 28 years of drumming I still do quite a bit od ridimentary repitition on the snare to warm up. My first drum teacher would not let me touch the practice kit until I passed his profficiency test on the 26 rudiments on the snare.
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Post Sat Jan 26, 2008 8:09 am

Here's a good tutorial on using the paradiddle on the drum set. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Snn7o1kn_-Q
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ChrisNichols
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Post Sat Jan 26, 2008 9:42 am

I don't think rudiments are absolutely vital, no. Do they help? Absolutely. I don't know every rudiment in the book, not even close, but the ones I do know have vastly improved my playing, and I can play much more interesting fills and solos when I incorporate them.
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Bloomdrums
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Post Sat Jan 26, 2008 11:55 am

personally i would say that you cannot master rudiments. there is always a way to play them better, faster, or at least different. and like someone else said, there isnt really ever a moving on. you always default back to rudiments if you cant think of anything else to play, need to warm up your hands, need to keep up your chops in your off time...etc. plus there are like 70 of those things now anyway, if you dont like the ones you see in the list of 26 or 40, find some other ones. but youll be disowned by any drummer who says: triple paradiddle with a ratamacue, and you say: what?

not that rudiments are the most important thing ever...i havent practiced any in like a month or two because im lazy. but of course ive used a drag tap and a single stroke 4 and a paradiddle and a 5 stroke roll in my playing anyway. so i never really left them behind.
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Potatoe Snack
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Post Sat Jan 26, 2008 3:29 pm

Bloomdrums wrote:but youll be disowned by any drummer who says: triple paradiddle with a ratamacue, and you say: what?



...what?
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Post Sat Jan 26, 2008 6:07 pm

That is exactly what I recommend and after 28 years of drumming I still do quite a bit ofrudimentary repetition on the snare to warm up. My first drum teacher would not let me touch the practice kit until I passed his proficiency test on the 26 rudiments on the snare.


I always start even beginners off with simple beats on the kit. As a kid, I always quit if it wasn't fun or interesting.
It give them a sense of accomplishment and relieves the monotony of boring assignments.
I even encourage them to use music as a timekeeper while practicing the boring stuff.
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Post Mon Jan 28, 2008 1:18 am

Potatoe Snack wrote:
Bloomdrums wrote:but youll be disowned by any drummer who says: triple paradiddle with a ratamacue, and you say: what?



...what?


you sir, are disowned....


i guess
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Alan_
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Post Mon Jan 28, 2008 8:45 am

they're not necessary at all. having said that, they're extremely useful in developing the ability to express musical ideas fluently.

I've known drummers who wouldn't know a pataflafla from a swiss army triplet who can outplay many who have studied music from a more theoretical standpoint. Personally, I've always been interested in the physics, theory and technique of playing, so I've worked the hell out of many different methods and books.

I'd certainly never steer someone away from utilizing every tool available to them. Far from making your playing homogenous, these tools enable you to express yourself more easily.
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Post Mon Jan 28, 2008 4:56 pm

To those who say learning rudiments aren't neccessary -- every time you play a drum with a stick you're using rudiments, you just don't realize it. The basic 40 are the basic 40 because the cover every basic combination of strokes you would want to accomplish. All the rudiments do is systematize it in a way to compile and learn them quickly. It expedites what will otherwise become a lifetime a frustration for learning newer, more complicated things.

Rudiments aren't about playing rudiments or even playing fast and/or technically. They are about playing cleanly and providing a facility to learn things quickly. Rudiments will not only allow you to pick up things quickly with your hands (hear it --> play it), it will train your ears to hear complex rythmic patterns. You will always be a better more capable drummer by learning your rudiments.

As for a guideline, here's what I've used for my rudimental students in the past:

- All 26 @ 100 BPM = intermediate

- All 40 @ 124 BPM (march time) = advanced

- All 40 @ 144 BPM = master

I'm a pretty hard judge on what passes. I usually require them to play a series of rudiments -- once right hand lead and once left hand lead -- 10 times each at the above tempos. If they play 9 cleanly and bomb the last one, they have to start over. At 144 bpm for the master level, they have to play each rudiment cleanly 50 times or they fail.

These are arbitrary standards but they get the point across about rudiments requiring perfect execution, not break neck speed.
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Post Tue Jan 29, 2008 4:19 am

I would have to say that either way you look at it...you have to learn your rudiments. any drummer, even those without any formal education in drums and percussion, use some rudimental skills. It is like studying literature and gaining a greater mastery of the language. anyone can speak...but some speak differently and with a greater vocabulary. Now any drummer can play and get his or her point accross, although having a greater musical vocabulary certainly makes things more eloquent and easy. just about every drummer alive uses the basic 40 in one way or another without realizing it. rolls, drags, flams, paradiddles, all pretty basic in even the easiest of rhythms. I have been playing for almost 10 years now and I for one as a marching drum tech do advocate learning the rudiments, basic and hybrid. It just flat out makes moving around the kit easier. and yep it all starts out just tapping on a snare. Music itself is a learning experience, there is no such thing as knowing everything because there are always new ways, new styles, and new sounds being pioneered every day. So i would say learn as much as you can and keep learning.
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Post Tue Jan 29, 2008 6:37 am

I've explained the rudiments to some kids like this:

It's a building block for playing the drums. Just like a building, can you build a building without a good base? Yes, but can it get as tall or be as strong as something that has a foundation. Can it stand the test of time?

Drums, just like anything in life has a basic element. If you learn those basics, things are easier to understand and you can move forward with confidence. If you don't have the basics you can still move ahead, but you may not get the gig because someone may have a better understanding of the music or they just know how to do some basic sticking that is needed.

The old saying goes "Knowledge is power". As with anything you have a choice. You can learn the basics or not but it's up to the individual.
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Post Tue Jan 29, 2008 10:16 am

[quote="Gaddabout"]To those who say learning rudiments aren't neccessary -- every time you play a drum with a stick you're using rudiments, you just don't realize it. The basic 40 are the basic 40 because the cover every basic combination of strokes you would want to accomplish. All the rudiments do is systematize it in a way to compile and learn them quickly. It expedites what will otherwise become a lifetime a frustration for learning newer, more complicated things.

Rudiments aren't about playing rudiments or even playing fast and/or technically. They are about playing cleanly and providing a facility to learn things quickly. Rudiments will not only allow you to pick up things quickly with your hands (hear it --> play it), it will train your ears to hear complex rythmic patterns. You will always be a better more capable drummer by learning your rudiments.

I go with this, as well as the advice put forth by BillRay, Jake 84 and Drums Plus. Playing without knowing rudiments is kind of like playing guitar without knowing any chords or scales. I know, there's lots of bashers out there that don't know a flam from a ruff, but I know some guys that are dumb as a post that at least know that most of John Bonham's tastiest fills involved the use of paradiddles.